The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Other Stringed Instruments

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 05-27-2019, 12:55 PM
RJVB RJVB is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: La Ferté Milon, France
Posts: 325
Default resonator cone life

Hi,

From what I understand, resonator cones don't live eternally but need replacement after a certain amount of time (I suppose they develop metal fatigue or something similar).

What to expect in terms of the average interval, and the speed at which the become unplayable when it's their time (graceful degradation vs. sudden death)?
Would it be wise to have at least 1 original cone in stock (if you don't own a resonator made by or compatible with one of the big brands)?

Thanks!
__________________
Gretsch G9240 "Alligator" wood-body resonator converted to non-metal strings
Bolink baroque violin
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-27-2019, 01:50 PM
LyleGorch's Avatar
LyleGorch LyleGorch is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Ewing, New Jersey
Posts: 168
Default

Changed mine after 40 years.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-27-2019, 02:10 PM
Howard Emerson Howard Emerson is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Huntington Station, New York
Posts: 6,266
Default

Jerry Douglas changes his once a year.

HE
__________________
My New Website!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-27-2019, 05:57 PM
LyleGorch's Avatar
LyleGorch LyleGorch is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Ewing, New Jersey
Posts: 168
Default

Beard suggests you to do it once a year.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-27-2019, 06:19 PM
Silly Moustache Silly Moustache is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: UK/EU
Posts: 15,259
Default

Really?

I've had, I think, three dobros. The last one was given to me by a dying friend.

It was a Gibson made one, but still with the Dobro logo, a 1999 vintage, so it was built with the intonation 1/4 " out, and the cone sounded awful.

After he passed - I had it rebuilt with a Beard cone and a correcting Spider made by Beard to correct the Gibson errors.

I've only ever had two Nationals and never had issues with the cones but my current one has had a neck reset and a new biscuit/saddle (which I'd had in my parts box for ages).
__________________
Silly Moustache,
Elderly singer, guitarist, dobrolist and mandolinist.

https://www.youtube.com/user/SillyMoustache/videos
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-28-2019, 01:27 PM
Neal Neal is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,475
Default

From Jason at National


For Tricone and single biscuit-type cones, they need not be changed until damaged by impact or ? I think there are plenty of folks who agree that changing a spider-type cone every couple of years is a good idea but we haven’t heard of any issues with our Scheerhorn cones.

Kind regards,

Jason
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-28-2019, 01:55 PM
RJVB RJVB is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: La Ferté Milon, France
Posts: 325
Default

Thanks, that's reassuring. Not that the Amplisonic cones for my Gretsch are expensive; I'm more concerned with them being modified or no longer being available without notification. I'll probably end up ordering a spare for the just-in-case but with that I should be fine until my own expiration date or until I get fed up with the instrument

I'm guessing that being under the lower tension of nylon strings won't hurt cone life either.

So what's different with spider bridge cones that they have such a shorter lifespan?
__________________
Gretsch G9240 "Alligator" wood-body resonator converted to non-metal strings
Bolink baroque violin
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-30-2019, 01:36 PM
THart THart is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Near the shores of Minnetonka
Posts: 54
Default

I'd never heard that about the spider bridge/cone but I'm pretty new & just a hobby player. I picked up a Weber resonator about 2 1/2 years ago & so far to my ear it just sounds better & better. Found out from Bruce Weber that it has a Replogle cone & spider so I sent him an email & this is his reply.

"Yes, the Weber reso has the Replogle cone and spider- tho' they did modify the saddle on the spider to make it adjustable (which is a great feature, by-the-way).

As for cone lifespan, without being damaged by shock (aka being dropped) or over stress (uneven string tension, or the tension screw being over-adjusted) the cones can last for decades.

Having said that, the real test is the sound, If the cone ever starts to loose its tone and projection, then you should inspect it for damage (dents, collapsed edges, etc) and if there are any sign of damage then a replacement would be in order. But basically, as long as you are loving the tone, it's good!

I'm glad you are loving the Reso, I'll let Bruce know

best,
Mike R."
__________________
000-15sm
Weber Bitterroot archtop
Weber Renegade roundneck resonator
'24 Gibson L-2
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-30-2019, 01:40 PM
MC5C MC5C is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Tatamagouche Nova Scotia
Posts: 815
Default

You have to remember that a lot of people who recommend changing cones regularly are people who make cones, and people who think the brand new tone is the best tone. And for them, they may be right. I have a 1935 Dobro spider cone instrument with the original cone, and it sounds quite awesome. Rich and loud.
__________________
Brian Evans
1935 Dobro model 25 resonator
1943 Paramount (made by Kay) mandolin
1946 Epiphone Zephyr electric archtop
1957 Hofner Senator archtop
1962 Gibson Melody Maker electric
1963 National Dynamic lap steel
1996 Landola jumbo
1998 Godin Artisan TC electric
1998 Epiphone SG electric
2010 GoldTone PBR-CA resonator
2015 Evans electric archtop
2016 Evans archtop
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-30-2019, 01:56 PM
RJVB RJVB is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: La Ferté Milon, France
Posts: 325
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by THart View Post
uneven string tension
One thing to remember that's probably fairly obvious: don't remove all strings and then put them back on (and to tune) working from left to right. Best is to work from the centre or from both sides and bring the strings to final tension only when they're all on. Or just change strings one by one.
I did make certain my luthier was on the same page in this regard when I took in the instrument for a new nut.

An original 1935 Dobro, wow!

I think I saw adjustable saddles for sale when I was searching for a replacement saddle. IIRC they only exist for spider bridge resos.
__________________
Gretsch G9240 "Alligator" wood-body resonator converted to non-metal strings
Bolink baroque violin
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-07-2019, 07:09 PM
The Bard Rocks The Bard Rocks is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Mohawk Valley
Posts: 5,067
Default

Took me 80 years on my Duolian. Had a heck of a time getting one to fit. I haven't liked the new one nearly so well.
__________________
The Bard Rocks

Kinnaird 000 Adk/Ziracote
Sexauer L00 Adk/Magnolia
Hatcher Jumbo Bearclaw/"Bacon" Padauk
Leach "Arctos" OM Millenium Sequioa/Macassar Ebony
Goodall Jumbo POC/flamed Mahogany
McAlister baritone Adk/Bubinga
Appollonio 12 POC/Myrtle
MJ Franks Resonator, all Australian Blackwood
'31 National Duolian
banjos of all kinds, mandolin, autoharp, tiple...
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-08-2019, 06:41 AM
Kitkatjoe Kitkatjoe is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 392
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJVB View Post
Hi,

From what I understand, resonator cones don't live eternally but need replacement after a certain amount of time (I suppose they develop metal fatigue or something similar).

What to expect in terms of the average interval, and the speed at which the become unplayable when it's their time (graceful degradation vs. sudden death)?
Would it be wise to have at least 1 original cone in stock (if you don't own a resonator made by or compatible with one of the big brands)?

Thanks!
If you have a guitar that sounds good to you just play it.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-08-2019, 04:38 PM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,644
Default

I have a 1930's Regal resonator mandolin. Original cone. I did have to modify the spider to get proper intonation. I've always heard you should never mess with a vintage cone - today's aluminum is different, etc. This reso mando has by far the clearest, sweetest tone of any resonator instrument I've heard or played. Like a bell. I'm looking for a reso guitar with the same tone quality. Haven't found it yet.
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Other Stringed Instruments

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=