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  #16  
Old 05-23-2019, 01:11 PM
spottydog10 spottydog10 is offline
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Hi Bax, I have changed the strings regularly and haven't noticed any problem removing the B in particular.
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  #17  
Old 05-23-2019, 01:28 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spottydog10 View Post
It's been regularly set up by the local guitar shop and he cant seem to find the reason why as everything else appears to be in good order.
Each repair person/maker has his or her own take on how to slot and ramp bridge pin holes and shape saddles. However, I'm a little puzzled by a few things shown in the photos.

First, the bridge pin hole ramps seem excessively wide, particularly for the thinner strings. Whether or not the B string is vibrating in that wide, flat-bottomed ramp, I don't know, but the ramping appears rather crude. That could be one area to investigate. You could jam some paper under and around the string to see if that helps with the "ping".

Second, it is difficult to see in the photos, but a sharper, better-defined breaking point on the saddle for the B string might eliminate the "ping". The top of the saddle might be too rounded. (Difficult to tell from the photos, but the breaking points might also not be positioned to give you the best intonation.)

Third, there seem to be "dings" or "dents" at various places in the saddle, particularly near the high E and the D strings. While I don't expect they would cause the "ping" you hear, it is an indicator of less than stellar work on the saddle.

It also looks like the pin holes are slotted sufficiently that you don't need slotted pins. I'd turn the pins around so that the slot faces away from the strings, see if that helps. The pins look the worse for wear: I'd replace them. I don't know if they - or their fit in the pin holes - is causing the "ping", but it is an area that looks like it could use some maintenance. I don't understand the denting on the top of the bridge adjacent to the pins or what looks like tear-out at the rear of the first pin: their presence might suggest less than stelar work or care.
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  #18  
Old 05-23-2019, 02:30 PM
spottydog10 spottydog10 is offline
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I tried turning the pin round and small piece of paper and then a small bit of rubber none of which has cured it.
I was hoping it was something I could sort out for myself but it looks like I'll have to take it back in to the tech.
Thanks for the help,
Mike
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  #19  
Old 05-23-2019, 02:48 PM
wrench68 wrench68 is offline
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Originally Posted by spottydog10 View Post
....wrench68, ...... Can you explain the paper/slot check in a bit more detail? Thanks.
I'm looking for something similar to what Charles described in the string ramp/slots in the bridge. More specifically, a nut slot such that the string is not optimally restrained, causing a vibration of the string against the sides of the slot. This can happen when the bottom radius is poorly matched to the string, and the width of the slot is greater than the string diameter.

The quick check on this is to:
1. loosen the string
2. lift it out of the slot
3. lay a small piece of paper in the nut slot
4. place the string back in the slot on top of the paper
5. tune back up and try it

I know you said the sound seemed to be coming from the bridge, but I have first person experiences of guitar noises travelling long distances to be annoying - and elusive!
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  #20  
Old 05-23-2019, 03:00 PM
spottydog10 spottydog10 is offline
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wrench, I tried the paper in the nut slot the other day but tried it again just now to make sure - didn't work.
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  #21  
Old 05-23-2019, 03:16 PM
wrench68 wrench68 is offline
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I just listened to your recording again. What kind of pick are you using? Just for giggles, try a thicker and rounder pick.
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  #22  
Old 05-23-2019, 04:19 PM
spottydog10 spottydog10 is offline
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Here is with a thick Dunlop sculpted 13 plectrum and the top E for comparison.

https://soundcloud.com/mike-spot/pingthickpick
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  #23  
Old 05-23-2019, 05:28 PM
wrench68 wrench68 is offline
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Audibly, that sounded better to me. Visually, the graphs on Soundcloud also appear smoother on the decay. Do you hear the improvement?

Perhaps one last experiment is to tune down a half step and capo at the first fret. The objective here is for the rubber on the capo to dampen the string acceleration caused by the release from the pick.

I recently went through this another guitar whose only crime was being very resonant at that frequency. I solved this by using a very "warm" pick with a very rounded tip. Such a pick significantly reduces the violent acceleration as the string separates from it.
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  #24  
Old 05-23-2019, 06:22 PM
spottydog10 spottydog10 is offline
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Haha, it sounds worse to me
I have already tried a capo with no improvement.
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