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  #1  
Old 04-29-2019, 12:03 PM
TRU TRU is offline
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Default Gibson ES-125

What are the differences between the ES-125 and the ES-125T?
Is one generally more desirable than the other?
Does one tend to be more expensive than the other?
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  #2  
Old 04-29-2019, 12:52 PM
DanR DanR is offline
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I'm not sure of the value of either but the 'T' means thinline as the body depth is thinner.
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Old 04-29-2019, 02:44 PM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Price varies according to market, but FYI the more lightly-constructed full-depth 125's from the late-40s through mid-50s are viable acoustic instruments as well (much like their current Godin Kingpin and Loar LH-309 counterparts, as well as the 17" ES-150 from the same period), and have a dedicated following among Swing/early Bop-era jazzers and postwar blues players; FWIW I've played a few 125T's over the years, and if you're really in the market for "that" look/sound there are several modern instruments - Epiphone Century/James Bay, Loar LH-301T, Guild T-50 - that offer the same vibe and, since they can all be had for under $1K, save you a fistful of Franklins in the bargain...
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:31 PM
jricc jricc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve DeRosa View Post
Price varies according to market, but FYI the more lightly-constructed full-depth 125's from the late-40s through mid-50s are viable acoustic instruments as well (much like their current Godin Kingpin and Loar LH-309 counterparts, as well as the 17" ES-150 from the same period), and have a dedicated following among Swing/early Bop-era jazzers and postwar blues players; FWIW I've played a few 125T's over the years, and if you're really in the market for "that" look/sound there are several modern instruments - Epiphone Century/James Bay, Loar LH-301T, Guild T-50 - that offer the same vibe and, since they can all be had for under $1K, save you a fistful of Franklins in the bargain...
Love the Guild T-50

Last edited by jricc; 04-29-2019 at 06:51 PM.
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Old 05-01-2019, 08:31 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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Red face

I've had a couple of ES-125T's, both single pickup, one with a P90 in the middle between bridge and neck. I loved them, and honestly have no recollection of selling them yet I no longer own them...

They were, and are, student model guitars, lowest of the line, not embellished at all, in fact the mid-1960's ones had a horrible plastic pickguard thing and only one F-hole. The neck joints sometimes caused problems on the thin body versions, not much neck block. The cheapness instilled a certain mojo, a kind of funky feel, and there is no question that they are Gibsons.

Brian
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Old 05-01-2019, 09:38 AM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC5C View Post
...in fact the mid-1960's ones had a horrible plastic pickguard thing and only one F-hole...
I believe you're thinking of the ES-120T, which was to the ES-125/125T what the Melody Maker was to the SG Junior - a rock-bottom entry-level instrument equipped with a single Fender Duo-Sonic style pickup and controls, mounted into a bulbous elevated pickguard assembly that obscured most of the lower half of the guitar. I had a grad-school friend who owned one and, while it played like a contemporary Gibson thinline, wasn't in the same league tonally compared to its ES-125T counterpart - the better examples of which could IME go from a classic jazzy sweetness to an edgy, bluesy crunch...
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Old 05-01-2019, 10:36 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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George Thorogood...
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1935 Dobro model 25 resonator
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1946 Epiphone Zephyr electric archtop
1957 Hofner Senator archtop
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1963 National Dynamic lap steel
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1998 Epiphone SG electric
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Old 05-01-2019, 05:43 PM
joshea joshea is offline
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Early 50's full-depth 125 here. Bright but also full, resonant and responsive acoustically and plugged in. It might have been positioned as a "student" guitar but plays as well, if not better then many 175's I've tried. The early models definitely are lighter in build and still a good value. Though certainly not as cheap as they once were.
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Old 05-01-2019, 07:35 PM
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I have my Fatherís 1950 ES 125. It needs a fret replacement down in the cowboy chord region. I just donít seem to be able to have it done. All that wear came mostly from him.
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Old 05-02-2019, 05:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC5C View Post
I've had a couple of ES-125T's, both single pickup, one with a P90 in the middle between bridge and neck. I loved them, and honestly have no recollection of selling them yet I no longer own them...
Ha! I could have written the EXACT same thing, except I had a 1958 ES-125 and a 1958 ES-125T
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:03 PM
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I have a '59 ES 125T, got I for about$1400 a year ago. I really like the unamplified sound, fun to play in the living room, it would never cut through playing out. Plugged in I'm struggling, but blaming my Blues Jr which I never liked. A bit boomy up top, plinky down low. I can coax a decent jazz sound out of it, but its a balancing act. I want to go try it through a Princeton, or even an acoustic amp. I can get a deep dark reverb sound thats cool, but not the range of sound Id hoped for. Check Youtube though, theres a bunch of guys there that make these things sound great.
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:27 PM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woolbury View Post
...I really like the unamplified sound, fun to play in the living room, it would never cut through playing out. Plugged in I'm struggling, but blaming my Blues Jr which I never liked. A bit boomy up top, plinky down low. I can coax a decent jazz sound out of it, but it's a balancing act...
What strings are you using - FYI these babies like a heavier set for both acoustic and electric work (think 12's or 13's with a wound G) - and have you adjusted the polepieces?
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Old 05-11-2019, 11:41 AM
Woolbury Woolbury is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve DeRosa View Post
What strings are you using - FYI these babies like a heavier set for both acoustic and electric work (think 12's or 13's with a wound G) - and have you adjusted the polepieces?
It had flat wounds on when I got it, really dark. I popped for some Thomastik Infeld Jazz bebops 53-13, and definitely prefer them to the flat wounds. I haven't messed with the pole pieces. Are you suggesting I take the bass ones down a bit and raise the treble? I could give that a try. I did stop by a shop breifly and plugged into a Princeton, and thought it sounded worlds better. I don't think that my Blues Jr can produce a nice balanced clean sound at low volumes like I'm playing. So I have a Princeton on my mind, but also would like to plug into a small Roland or AER acoustic amp and check those sounds. Any amp advice?
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Old 05-11-2019, 06:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woolbury View Post
It had flat wounds on when I got it, really dark. I popped for some Thomastik Infeld Jazz bebops 53-13, and definitely prefer them to the flat wounds. I haven't messed with the pole pieces. Are you suggesting I take the bass ones down a bit and raise the treble? I could give that a try. I did stop by a shop breifly and plugged into a Princeton, and thought it sounded worlds better. I don't think that my Blues Jr can produce a nice balanced clean sound at low volumes like I'm playing. So I have a Princeton on my mind, but also would like to plug into a small Roland or AER acoustic amp and check those sounds. Any amp advice?
I know you weren't asking ME, however, lemme tell ya! The 1960 Gibson Skylark GA-5T really frickin growls! IT...IS...EXCELLENT!
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