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  #16  
Old 01-13-2017, 08:08 PM
jed1894 jed1894 is offline
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By the way:::::: I'm I crazy in that I want to put this acoustic up and play electric? I've been playing the Ibanez rg1570 I got for my son and I can get the chords much better .... It sounds better too. Maybe I should have started with the electric. Or maybe playing the acoustic, which is harder, will make me a better electric player ???
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  #17  
Old 01-14-2017, 09:33 AM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Originally Posted by jed1894 View Post
Thanks for the very informative information. You guys are great and very nice. I now have a new addiction I guess.

I went by Guitar Center today and looked around...I know this is bad, but I couldn't tell much difference in the nice ones compared to the Squier Affinity I'm wanting to get...I just don't know enough yet. Very confusing...

So, I have a friend who owns a music store who sold me the two acoustics... he said just get one of the Squier Affinity type entry level guitars for now and come back and get something nice for Xmas when I know more about guitars.

At this point, he's right. I don't know jack about guitars...
Thanks for the props...

As far as not knowing anything about guitars at this point, I've been in this game for 55 years and I can tell you, as a regular AGF poster familiar with the individuals above, you're reaping the benefits of a couple hundred years' accumulated experience here, in most cases (certainly my own) acquired at the world-renowned School of Hard Knocks and The Discovery Academy of Electric Guitar - as in hook it up, plug it in, turn it on, twist the dials until you find the tone(s) you like, write it down so you don't forget, and hope that the crowd likes what they hear as much as you do at tonight's school gym/church basement/union hall gig (heaven help you if they didn't when/where I grew up ). You also have the advantage of simultaneous access to a variety of valid points of view on any given topic - I picked up my knowledge piecemeal on the job, as well as on the streets of New York in the '60s/70s, roaming the pawn shops and off-the-beaten-path dealers in the waning days of the "old" music business - and while we can (and often do) disagree on certain issues, you can glean a great deal of useful information from what you read, come to your own well-grounded conclusions, rest secure in the fact that nobody here would attempt to steer you wrong, and realize that Rome wasn't built in a day...

In that spirit, I'll address your next post:

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Originally Posted by jed1894 View Post
...am I crazy in that I want to put this acoustic up and play electric? I've been playing the Ibanez RG1570 I got for my son and I can get the chords much better...It sounds better too. Maybe I should have started with the electric. Or maybe playing the acoustic, which is harder, will make me a better electric player???
While many players will point to certain indisputable advantages in starting with an electric guitar - some of which you cite above - having started as a nine-year-old jazzer in the early-60's, playing Big Band-style archtop comp boxes with heavy-gauge strings and high action, I'm squarely in the "acoustic first" category; although at one time it might have been an "either/or" proposition, a well-rounded player today needs to be reasonably (if not equally) proficient on both instruments if he/she expects to land the opening in that hot new band - a tidbit of information, BTW, you might wish to share with your son. Based on your self-evaluation, you clearly - and quite understandably, at this point in the game - have a good deal to learn about technique and tone production (feel free to call on any of us for tips in that department as well), and the only thing an electric will do for you right now is make your mistakes louder ; in the same vein, the heavier setup (thicker strings, higher action, more neck relief) necessary to produce acoustic volume functions in much the same manner as progressive weight training or a ballplayer's use of an on-deck donut - the added resistance increases stamina/strength and will in turn make a lighter setup even easier to handle, and for longer periods. Since you and your son are in this together, I'd suggest arranging a "swap" schedule (you practice on acoustic on odd-numbered days and electric on even, and him vice versa) to allow both of you to take advantage of each other's instruments - it'll not only develop your mutual proficiency, but will go a long way in keeping peace with the home-office accounts-payable department...
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  #18  
Old 01-14-2017, 03:39 PM
whiteshadow whiteshadow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jed1894 View Post
By the way:::::: I'm I crazy in that I want to put this acoustic up and play electric? I've been playing the Ibanez rg1570 I got for my son and I can get the chords much better .... It sounds better too. Maybe I should have started with the electric. Or maybe playing the acoustic, which is harder, will make me a better electric player ???
One of the best bits of advice I saw for people starting out and wanting to buy a guitar was to buy a guitar that inspires them to want to play.

If you buy something that you think sounds\looks great you'll be 10x more likely to pick it up and practice because you want to. That's the key, you need to get a guitar that makes you want to play.

One thing I don't think you've mentioned was what type of music you want to play. That'll make a difference to suggestions people will give you.

There's certain guitars that are more suited for different styles of music. The Ibanez RG that your son has (I own a Prestige RG) is built for speed and is 'slightly' easier to play fast than some other guitars as well as being suited for heavier rock\metal.

From what you've said I think you should defo get an electric. It's what you want to play. No point keeping your acoustic and have it sitting in a corner gathering dust.
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  #19  
Old 01-14-2017, 04:16 PM
jed1894 jed1894 is offline
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Originally Posted by Steve DeRosa View Post
Thanks for the props...

As far as not knowing anything about guitars at this point, I've been in this game for 55 years and I can tell you, as a regular AGF poster familiar with the individuals above, you're reaping the benefits of a couple hundred years' accumulated experience here, in most cases (certainly my own) acquired at the world-renowned School of Hard Knocks and The Discovery Academy of Electric Guitar - as in hook it up, plug it in, turn it on, twist the dials until you find the tone(s) you like, write it down so you don't forget, and hope that the crowd likes what they hear as much as you do at tonight's school gym/church basement/union hall gig (heaven help you if they didn't when/where I grew up ). You also have the advantage of simultaneous access to a variety of valid points of view on any given topic - I picked up my knowledge piecemeal on the job, as well as on the streets of New York in the '60s/70s, roaming the pawn shops and off-the-beaten-path dealers in the waning days of the "old" music business - and while we can (and often do) disagree on certain issues, you can glean a great deal of useful information from what you read, come to your own well-grounded conclusions, rest secure in the fact that nobody here would attempt to steer you wrong, and realize that Rome wasn't built in a day...

In that spirit, I'll address your next post:


While many players will point to certain indisputable advantages in starting with an electric guitar - some of which you cite above - having started as a nine-year-old jazzer in the early-60's, playing Big Band-style archtop comp boxes with heavy-gauge strings and high action, I'm squarely in the "acoustic first" category; although at one time it might have been an "either/or" proposition, a well-rounded player today needs to be reasonably (if not equally) proficient on both instruments if he/she expects to land the opening in that hot new band - a tidbit of information, BTW, you might wish to share with your son. Based on your self-evaluation, you clearly - and quite understandably, at this point in the game - have a good deal to learn about technique and tone production (feel free to call on any of us for tips in that department as well), and the only thing an electric will do for you right now is make your mistakes louder ; in the same vein, the heavier setup (thicker strings, higher action, more neck relief) necessary to produce acoustic volume functions in much the same manner as progressive weight training or a ballplayer's use of an on-deck donut - the added resistance increases stamina/strength and will in turn make a lighter setup even easier to handle, and for longer periods. Since you and your son are in this together, I'd suggest arranging a "swap" schedule (you practice on acoustic on odd-numbered days and electric on even, and him vice versa) to allow both of you to take advantage of each other's instruments - it'll not only develop your mutual proficiency, but will go a long way in keeping peace with the home-office accounts-payable department...
Great advice. I picked up a Squier affinity today so we both have one. I thought I would trick him out of the RG, but no dice...LOL. He immediately noticed the difference in quality and playability. Worked out good since I plan to not give up on acoustic yet.... So I will fool a round with the Squier a little and see what happens. Thanks again.
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  #20  
Old 01-14-2017, 04:21 PM
jed1894 jed1894 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteshadow View Post
One of the best bits of advice I saw for people starting out and wanting to buy a guitar was to buy a guitar that inspires them to want to play.

If you buy something that you think sounds\looks great you'll be 10x more likely to pick it up and practice because you want to. That's the key, you need to get a guitar that makes you want to play.

One thing I don't think you've mentioned was what type of music you want to play. That'll make a difference to suggestions people will give you.

There's certain guitars that are more suited for different styles of music. The Ibanez RG that your son has (I own a Prestige RG) is built for speed and is 'slightly' easier to play fast than some other guitars as well as being suited for heavier rock\metal.

From what you've said I think you should defo get an electric. It's what you want to play. No point keeping your acoustic and have it sitting in a corner gathering dust.
I like Eagles type easy rock. America... Easy stuff. George Strait and Willie. Also like van halen, bad company, Aerosmith type too. Guess I like it all except Justin Beeber stuff....

Picked up Squier today to play around with ....Let's see where I end up. It's all fun..... If I could just get the **** C chord!!!!
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  #21  
Old 01-14-2017, 04:27 PM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Originally Posted by jed1894 View Post
I like Eagles type easy rock. America.. Easy stuff. George Strait and Willie. Also like Van Halen, Bad Company, Aerosmith type too...!
'70s country rock - you'll definitely need that acoustic...
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  #22  
Old 01-14-2017, 04:28 PM
whiteshadow whiteshadow is offline
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Glad you got a guitar sorted.

I think you made the right choice getting an electric. The Squiers are really good value for money, I started off on one years ago and if anything the build quality is better now than it was back then. It should suit the styles of music you like pretty well too.
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  #23  
Old 01-14-2017, 07:09 PM
jed1894 jed1894 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteshadow View Post
Glad you got a guitar sorted.

I think you made the right choice getting an electric. The Squiers are really good value for money, I started off on one years ago and if anything the build quality is better now than it was back then. It should suit the styles of music you like pretty well too.

I hope you're right because I got another rookie question I hope you guys can help me with:

In the store, the owner hooked up the Squier to his in-store (larger amp) and it totally rocked. I'm not sure where he had the dials on guitar and/or amp. Got it home and plugged into amp and first got a kind of staticed, humming backfeed. I switched the plugs (changed ends) and it played. Forgot what setting I had it on nor do I remember volume. I thought all was good. Got called to supper.

Got it back out and plugged up to irig and I have to turn it all the way up to hear it through headphones. Plug it back up to the amp and It sounds good but I have to turn volume up on the amp (around 6) and the guitar volume to around 7 to get some good sound. It only has 3 pick ups (if that's what they're called).

Now, compare that to the Ibanez prestige 1570. the Ibanez blows the irig away with good volume and it rocks big time the little 15w amp with the volume set on 2. It has 5 pickups and I think the previous owner (who was in a rock band) did some work to it as well.

So, I would think I would get more sound out of the irig with the squire. Maybe not..... Did that first little static humming backfeed harm something? Also, the plug does not entirely seat all the way into guitar. There is very tiny space right at the end. Anyway, is there anything I can check to test this or did I just get what I paid for and be happy with my baby amp and have fun while my 11 year old laughs at my weak guitar while he blows me away with his van halen rendition 😳😂😂😂?


Thanks in advance
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  #24  
Old 01-14-2017, 07:35 PM
jed1894 jed1894 is offline
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Forgot to ask about input jack issues. It has a nut on it. Should I try to tighten a tad ?
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  #25  
Old 01-15-2017, 05:51 AM
LSemmens LSemmens is offline
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Are you sure it's not just a dud lead?
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  #26  
Old 01-15-2017, 05:54 AM
jed1894 jed1894 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LSemmens View Post
Are you sure it's not just a dud lead?

Not sure. I did try another cable/wire that worked on another guitar. Is there a way to check that ? I was thinking about unscrewing the input and taking a look but didn't want to void the warranty.
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