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  #31  
Old 01-29-2021, 04:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Guitars44me View Post
This thread is too cool for school. Thank you for sharing all this. Really interesting!!!

Go hand crafting, Go

Paul
Thanks Paul I’m glad you are enjoying the thread! I enjoy sharing my work.

Mark
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  #32  
Old 01-29-2021, 04:47 AM
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Mark - I really enjoyed the vignette about measuring your shavings and adjusting with the brass hammer. This could become a great magazine article (in all of your spare time ).

Rick
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  #33  
Old 01-29-2021, 11:08 AM
JDaniel JDaniel is offline
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Thanks, Mark. This is great! Lie-Nielsen came to the local lumberyard in autumn 2019 to display tools and demonstrate/teach. Very nice people every bit as excellent as the tools. Love your technique of measuring the shavings for blade adjustment.
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  #34  
Old 01-29-2021, 11:21 AM
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I have never even thought of adjusting a modern plane with a hammer, and always thought it was a technique for Krenov style planes, but this makes total sense! The lateral adjustment on most planes just aren’t sensitive enough for dialing into 0.001” or differences. Thanks, Mark, for sharing glimpses into your knowledge and skill on these subjects!

Now I’m gonna go spend some time with my #4, a mallet, and some calipers.
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  #35  
Old 01-29-2021, 12:57 PM
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'No sawdust, no dust mask, no dust collector, no ear protection, no noise just the sound of the wood doing my bidding!'

This is a great quote, I'm really enjoying following this thread. I'm an amateur/hobby luthier and try to use hand tools whenever I can. I find them more relaxing and enjoyable to use, safer and far more agreeable with my neighbours! I just wish I could produce guitars with a fraction of the quality of yours. Inspirational stuff.
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  #36  
Old 01-29-2021, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by srick View Post
Mark - I really enjoyed the vignette about measuring your shavings and adjusting with the brass hammer. This could become a great magazine article (in all of your spare time ).

Rick
Thanks Rick, measuring the shavings is a great way to get accurate control. We don’t have that option with powered machinery that turn everything into dust.

I’m writing an article for the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers’ annual Journal magazine. I’m referring back to the material I’ve previously written here in AGF which makes it pretty easy.

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Originally Posted by JDaniel View Post
Thanks, Mark. This is great! Lie-Nielsen came to the local lumberyard in autumn 2019 to display tools and demonstrate/teach. Very nice people every bit as excellent as the tools. Love your technique of measuring the shavings for blade adjustment.
That is my impression of the folks at Lie-Nielsen too. In healthier times they go on tour to show and teach about woodworking and don’t charge entrance fees. What I particularly like is they invite other smaller toolmakers to show also.

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Originally Posted by Archaic Guitars View Post
I have never even thought of adjusting a modern plane with a hammer, and always thought it was a technique for Krenov style planes, but this makes total sense! The lateral adjustment on most planes just aren’t sensitive enough for dialing into 0.001” or differences. Thanks, Mark, for sharing glimpses into your knowledge and skill on these subjects!

Now I’m gonna go spend some time with my #4, a mallet, and some calipers.
Great! I’m glad you found some inspiration in that!
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  #37  
Old 01-29-2021, 05:56 PM
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Mark, as always another interesting thread, I like how you stated you are not on some crusade of hand tools vs power tools, just looking at another way to make a better product.

For me it's always been a combination of hand and power depending on the task at hand. I think my Jet drum sander might be the 2nd or 3rd coolest thing I've bought in the past few years or so, my digital camera being #1(one of the greatest things ever) and maybe #2 MB 560 SEC.

As a finish carpenter I was always surprised on how many guys didn't have a block plane, didn't see how anyone could do quality work without one no matter what power tools you had use of.

As great as hand tools are for somethings I have yet to see one of the most useful power tools non power equivalent a vacuum cleaner. A vac not for dust control but for just general clean up. Some may not think of it as a tool but spend a day on just about any type of job without one and see how it goes.

Will look forward to more posts on this journey.

Bruce,
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  #38  
Old 01-30-2021, 05:27 AM
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Thanks Mark. Your posts and pics are so informative. Love the top comparison of sanded to planed. Phenomenal difference! Sure love watching this thread.
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  #39  
Old 01-30-2021, 06:57 AM
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Mark

Couple of questions about your tooling...

I agree with you about the smoothing plane. I have several so I can keep them set to take different cuts. My favorite is a brass #3 Lie-Nielsen. The sound of it being sharp and slicing the thinnest layer is just magic.

I haven’t heard you talk about card scrappers and I am learning about using them. Do you use scrappers? How do you use them? While I don’t build guitars I am trying to get to the point where I don’t use sandpaper when I do my woodworking.

Thanks for all your insights.

Jack
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  #40  
Old 01-30-2021, 08:05 AM
SJ VanSandt SJ VanSandt is offline
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Default This is an inspiring thread!

I am so happy that you are doing this, Mark. As a rabid environmentalist, I've always found the power tool aspect of "hand-built" guitars to be unfortunate, but didn't see any way around it. This gives me hope. And, I must say, it makes me even prouder to be the owner of a Hatcher guitar!

All the best,

Stan
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  #41  
Old 01-30-2021, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BEJ View Post
Mark, as always another interesting thread, I like how you stated you are not on some crusade of hand tools vs power tools, just looking at another way to make a better product.

For me it's always been a combination of hand and power depending on the task at hand. I think my Jet drum sander might be the 2nd or 3rd coolest thing I've bought in the past few years or so, my digital camera being #1(one of the greatest things ever) and maybe #2 MB 560 SEC.

As a finish carpenter I was always surprised on how many guys didn't have a block plane, didn't see how anyone could do quality work without one no matter what power tools you had use of.

As great as hand tools are for somethings I have yet to see one of the most useful power tools non power equivalent a vacuum cleaner. A vac not for dust control but for just general clean up. Some may not think of it as a tool but spend a day on just about any type of job without one and see how it goes.

Will look forward to more posts on this journey.

Bruce,
Thanks for following along and for your comments. I agree with about the general clean up importance. A messy disorganized shop to me is depressing, unhealthy, and just a time and energy suck.

One thing I do that works well for me is to eliminate anything in the shop that is not directly involved or directly supportive of me making guitars. So my specialty bicycle tools are back at the house in the garage etc.

I agree with the digital camera as being an important tool. In fact it is the one tool in my shop that keeps all the other tools busy! Now if I were to go power free on that tool I guess a pencil and a piece of paper could replace the camera but, I'd still need to use a camera to get it up on the internet where my sales are made.

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Originally Posted by cigarfan View Post
Thanks Mark. Your posts and pics are so informative. Love the top comparison of sanded to planed. Phenomenal difference! Sure love watching this thread.
Thanks cigarfan!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jayhawk View Post
Mark

Couple of questions about your tooling...

I agree with you about the smoothing plane. I have several so I can keep them set to take different cuts. My favorite is a brass #3 Lie-Nielsen. The sound of it being sharp and slicing the thinnest layer is just magic.

I haven’t heard you talk about card scrappers and I am learning about using them. Do you use scrappers? How do you use them? While I don’t build guitars I am trying to get to the point where I don’t use sandpaper when I do my woodworking.

Thanks for all your insights.

Jack
Jack I do use scrapers. Like the planes they fall into different families. I use scraper planes, card scrapers and specialty scrapers. Scrapers go way back and are the original sandpaper. In the grand scheme of things in guitar making I think the best finish for prepping wood is a planed surface, a close second is scraped and sanded as a last resort.

In this thread I am trying to highlight contemporary hand tools so this is a good time to mention a card scraper developed by Alan Carruth and sold by Stewmac. It is 1/8" thick and is shaped on a grinding wheel. It works a dream! It gets into places none of my planes do and is very controllable. I'll try to capture it in action somewhere during this thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SJ VanSandt View Post
I am so happy that you are doing this, Mark. As a rabid environmentalist, I've always found the power tool aspect of "hand-built" guitars to be unfortunate, but didn't see any way around it. This gives me hope. And, I must say, it makes me even prouder to be the owner of a Hatcher guitar!

All the best,

Stan
Thanks Stan, I can't say I don't have a power meter on my shop (not yet) but I will say it came as a revelation to me when I figured out that hand tools didn't stop evolving when electricity came out!
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  #42  
Old 01-30-2021, 09:38 AM
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Here are a couple progress shots of the Bloodwood back and Black MOP/Black Ebony inlay I'm working on:







Bloodwood has an amazing amount of chatoyance. Using the smoothing plane is the best way to prep the top for finish because it wonderfully shows that shine.

The Black Ebony Art Deco back inlay is centered with black mother-of-pearl. I like that at one angle it looks like the Black Ebony and then suddenly flashes to life with a change of the light.
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  #43  
Old 01-30-2021, 09:42 AM
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Wow - that's with no finish or even solvent on top? Who is your supplier for bloodwood?

Mark - how are you cutting your inlay recesses by hand and flattening their floors?
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  #44  
Old 01-30-2021, 09:44 AM
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Also - from the wood database:

Workability: Bloodwood is extremely dense, and has a pronounced blunting effect on cutters. The wood tends to be brittle and can splinter easily while being worked. Those persistent enough to bear with the difficulties of working with Bloodwood to the finishing stage are rewarded with an exceptional and lustrous red surface.

Mark -Do you agree with this? The wood looks spectacular

best,

Rick
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  #45  
Old 01-30-2021, 10:23 AM
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Wow - that's with no finish or even solvent on top? Who is your supplier for bloodwood?

Mark - how are you cutting your inlay recesses by hand and flattening their floors?
I large Bloodwood board years ago from Willard Brothers in Trenton NJ and re-sawed a number of back and side sets.

There is one quick swipe of shellac on there. Sorry, I try to always name what I am showing.

I cut the inlays with a jewelry saw. I routed the pocket with my Foredom. That Bloodwood is just too hard and splintery for me to attempt cutting the pocket and cleaning the floor with my little router plane, at least for now. I'm working on that skill. I currently am cutting and cleaning wider rosette rings by hand but those are in softwoods. I'm working on it and hope to get to the point that I'll take on doing pockets in hardwoods.

Quote:
Originally Posted by srick View Post
Also - from the wood database:

Workability: Bloodwood is extremely dense, and has a pronounced blunting effect on cutters. The wood tends to be brittle and can splinter easily while being worked. Those persistent enough to bear with the difficulties of working with Bloodwood to the finishing stage are rewarded with an exceptional and lustrous red surface.

Mark -Do you agree with this? The wood looks spectacular

best,

Rick
100% I'd only add that it taps like a top tier tonewood.
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