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  #16  
Old 06-14-2018, 09:52 PM
guitar george guitar george is offline
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I sometimes use the ends of the frets as fret markers and if the frets do not extend fully to the edge of the fretboard I will make some mistakes with position. I have one guitar where it is hard to see the ends of the frets and I notice I make some mistakes with position on that guitar in particular.
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  #17  
Old 06-14-2018, 10:25 PM
Imbler Imbler is offline
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My response is, why not side markers? They arenít visible to the audience and if they are even occasionally useful; why not?

I put them on the guitars I build.
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  #18  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:10 AM
sirwhale sirwhale is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imbler View Post
My response is, why not side markers? They arenít visible to the audience and if they are even occasionally useful; why not?

I put them on the guitars I build.
I also think "why not?". Not sure why people wouldn't want them. I didn't have them on my flamenco guitar, but I am using semi permanent dots on the 5th and 7th. They help my play.
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  #19  
Old 06-15-2018, 07:54 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imbler View Post
My response is, why not side markers?
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirwhale View Post
I also think "why not?". Not sure why people wouldn't want them.
Simply because I don't like the appearance of them. Since I don't find them useful or necessary, why would I want them? Since I don't like the appearance of them, why would I tolerate them?

I have nothing against other people wanting and using them, but I don't want or need them. I'm not trying to convince other people that they should or should not have them, as you both appear to be: I'm just stating my opinion.

On instruments that I have made for others, I'll happily put fret markers on if that's what they want. I'd hope that if someone is commissioning a custom-made instrument, they'd have a little more creativity than wanting dots, particularly if they want markers on the face of the fingerboard. But, that's just me.
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  #20  
Old 06-15-2018, 01:22 PM
pf400 pf400 is offline
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Don't give up, it'll come. I played guitars with fret markers and inlays for 40 years, then got a crossover with no markers. I'm no big talent, but it only took me about a month, playing everyday, to not miss the markers. I suggest that you practice pieces you already know well that require fretting notes or chords up and down the neck, and you'll build the muscle memory you need. Maybe just try some I IV V progressions (such as blues) in various positions. Just for the beauty of it, I did stick on a child's gold star sticker at the 12th fret, and it looks great but does not affect the playability.
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  #21  
Old 06-16-2018, 09:13 AM
Dave T Dave T is offline
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I have seen a number of classical guitars with a small dot inlaid on the side of the finger board at the 7th fret. My James Goodall classical has it. Just that one, but it helps finding your way around the finger board if you're still learning like me (after 50+ years of off & on playing).

Dave
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  #22  
Old 06-17-2018, 07:07 PM
Paraclete Paraclete is offline
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My Ramirez has one small finish mark at the 7th fret on the side for reference. Like playing a violin, classical guitar is about position and muscle memory. I think any more markers other than the 7th fret thing would confuse me on classical.
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  #23  
Old 06-18-2018, 07:29 AM
redir redir is offline
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I personally like to have one dot at 7 on the side. Most of the time I play with my eyes closed but for long runs I like to look when necessary and that one dot helps me a lot.

I built a classical guitar once that was for sale in my shop and a student from the local university came in looking for a guitar. He really liked this guitar but said that he had to take it to 'master' first, his distinguished university professor who apparently needed to sign off on all his students guitars. He came back a week later and said he could not buy the guitar because it had a dot on the side. Of course it is easy enough to just remove it but still.

The student went on to tell me that a lot of his students will put a drip of white out on the guitar and simply remove it when they have to perform for master.

It was amusing... But the point being that the classical guitar genre is as they say in Kentucky 'all ate up' about tradition.
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  #24  
Old 06-18-2018, 08:25 AM
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ljguitar ljguitar is offline
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Hi Jeff

The answer for some of my classical playing friends is snobbery. They make a point of telling people who look at the neck how unprofessional they are.

Had a guitar once without markers, so I bought pearl dots (StewMac) for the side of the neck, and used a drill bit with a stop (for depth) and installed side markers at frets 3, 5, 7, 9, 12 (double to mark the octave), and 15.

I'm not offended at my classical friend's disdain, and I'd rather have people look at the neck and hit the right notes than guess-n-miss em.



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  #25  
Old 06-18-2018, 11:13 AM
SouthpawJeff SouthpawJeff is offline
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Thanks for all the great replies! I havenít added anything yet but may still use a piece of tape at the 7th. I have noticed improvement over the last several days. I think part of the issue for me is that Iím also trying the get used to the classical fretboard as well. I find that while itís a bit awkward at first, my fingers do appreciate the extra room. When I switch back to steel string itís a lot easier to fret chords, but feels very cramped!

Anyway Iím still having trouble hitting anything between the 7th and 10th fret reliably, though I feel half my problem is Iím thinking about it instead of just grabbing it instinctively. That and being able to hit the 4th fret reaches with my pinky that are required for this piece. Though thatís because of the fretboard as Iím looking at the music and not the neck through those stretches, and I usually get them fine on the steel string.

Thanks,
Jeff
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  #26  
Old 06-20-2018, 03:57 PM
RobT RobT is offline
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I started with electrics and when I started taking classical lessons I found the lack of side dots a bit difficult. So I used "Wite Out" to make my own side dots. I happen to prefer no fretmarkers on the face of the fingerboard but prefer side markers at the usual fret locations.

As I switch guitars quite frequently, I find the use of side dots helpful i.e. when your are playing one guitar where the body joined the neck at the 12th fret and the next half hour I might be playing a guitar where the neck joins the body at the 14th fret or higher. It takes a bit to get your frame of reference squared away. So I find side dots useful.

As far as why, I find classical guitar players are more wedded to tradition than other instrumentalists and like LJ says above there is a certain amount of snobbery involved. I've been playing a while and if push came to shove, I really don't need location markers i.e. develop your ear but if it helps your playing than I say why not.

Last edited by RobT; 06-20-2018 at 03:59 PM. Reason: corrected spelling for Wite Out
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  #27  
Old 06-20-2018, 06:33 PM
rob2966 rob2966 is offline
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When I had my custom flamenco built I had a side-marker installed on fret 7 only. I find that one reference in the middle really helps and it is easy to quickly determine fret location using nut, 7th fret, and 12th (where the body joins).

My other flamenco has no markers at all. I occasionally screw-up a quick movement into the 6,7,8,9 fret range.

Later
Rob
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  #28  
Old 06-20-2018, 07:14 PM
tkoehler1 tkoehler1 is offline
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Man you are headed down a dangerous path. Next you'll be asking why are there are no truss rods.
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