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  #76  
Old 09-16-2020, 06:04 AM
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Ozarkpicker Ozarkpicker is offline
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Dumb subject...but I’ve heard it from more than one guitar snob.

If using a capo is a sign of being a “lesser” guitar player...I guess I’m “lesser”.
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  #77  
Old 09-16-2020, 06:24 AM
Robin, Wales Robin, Wales is offline
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Yay - Glen Campbell plays "Stranger's in the Night" for Frank Sinatra's recording session using cowboy chord shapes, a flatpick and a capo

I think of my own half dozen or so cowboy chord shapes, a flatpick and a capo as being an 'efficient' playing style rather than a 'lesser' playing style
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  #78  
Old 09-16-2020, 06:42 AM
BluesBelly BluesBelly is offline
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A capo is a tool much the same as a pick, a guitar strap, or case.
In certain circumstances it serves to make playing music more efficient and can be used to provide an alternate voicing(s) when playing with like instruments or on certain songs.
When playing fingerstyle it provides a means of playing intricate musical passages with learned and known fingering patterns should a singer request an alternate key.
When used in open cording situations such as accompanying other instruments in a musical group or worship setting a capo will let the strings ring much the same as playing in open position.
A capo is very useful in the recording studio as well.
Someone who chooses to scorn a capo is in peril of limiting their musical potential.

Just saying,
Blues
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  #79  
Old 09-16-2020, 06:55 AM
WilburForce WilburForce is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tico View Post
... in a lower key.

What do I win?
A capo.......
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  #80  
Old 09-16-2020, 08:39 AM
musicman1951 musicman1951 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pagedr View Post
Is that actually a thing? I don't think I've ever heard anyone claim that using a capo makes you a lesser player. If I did I'd probably just laugh because that's ridiculous.
I couldn't agree more. It might be an incredibly uninformed question, but I don't hear it from anyone I would call a musician.
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  #81  
Old 09-16-2020, 08:46 AM
Zigeuner Zigeuner is offline
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https://classicalguitarmagazine.com/...s-about-capos/
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  #82  
Old 09-16-2020, 08:50 AM
Goodallboy Goodallboy is offline
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“Dumb question, uninformed question, ridiculous question”, yet it gets 6 pages of replies.

Ponder that.
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  #83  
Old 09-16-2020, 08:51 AM
J Patrick J Patrick is offline
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...while the use of a capo does not in itself make one a lesser player...a better player may be able to do more without one in some situations....and the ability to hang in various situations without a capo may indicate a more advanced player...

...as far as guitar snobbery goes...I have never in over 50 years of playing with a whole lot of people...met any guitarist that looked down on a player because they used a capo ....pretty much every guitar player has one and uses it....I have to think there are relatively few musicians who view a capo as an indicator of overall ability...

Last edited by J Patrick; 09-16-2020 at 09:52 AM.
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  #84  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:06 AM
Martin_F Martin_F is offline
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I find it a little bit ridiculous to suggest that someone is a lesser player because they use a capo. Look at all the famous guitarists that use capo's! Most of the singer/songwriter/folk artists use capo's because they want a particular sound and in a particular key. There is nothing lesser about that. The capo also lets you do things that you couldn't by playing chords without a capo in a key that you want.

There are certain genre's of music where capo's might not work well. But, there are also many genre's where capo's are often necessary to create the sound you want. So, in the end it's a ridiculous assumption. It's like suggesting that anyone who plays full-barre chords is a lesser player because they don't know how to play the cowboy chord version or vice versa. They all have their place.

If you use a capo as a crutch, maybe you are limited. But, one could say the same thing about a jazz artist that only plays certain forms of 7th chords. Neither is wrong. Both could potentially be limiting.

I can't stand guitar snobs and people who constantly look down on others who don't do what they do. If all these snobs are so great, why aren't they all famous? Over and over you see people playing simple things creating great music. If you go by his guitar playing alone, who would have ever thought that someone like John Prine could be famous if you use the capo standard?

Don't listen to crazy folk who say things like this. Everyone should play to make beautiful music, not to compare the size of your *ego*.

My opinion..
Martin
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  #85  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:13 AM
Zigeuner Zigeuner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin_F View Post
I find it a little bit ridiculous to suggest that someone is a lesser player because they use a capo. Look at all the famous guitarists that use capo's! Most of the singer/songwriter/folk artists use capo's because they want a particular sound and in a particular key. There is nothing lesser about that. The capo also lets you do things that you couldn't by playing chords without a capo in a key that you want.

There are certain genre's of music where capo's might not work well. But, there are also many genre's where capo's are often necessary to create the sound you want. So, in the end it's a ridiculous assumption. It's like suggesting that anyone who plays full-barre chords is a lesser player because they don't know how to play the cowboy chord version or vice versa. They all have their place.

If you use a capo as a crutch, maybe you are limited. But, one could say the same thing about a jazz artist that only plays certain forms of 7th chords. Neither is wrong. Both could potentially be limiting.

I can't stand guitar snobs and people who constantly look down on others who don't do what they do. If all these snobs are so great, why aren't they all famous? Over and over you see people playing simple things creating great music. If you go by his guitar playing alone, who would have ever thought that someone like John Prine could be famous if you use the capo standard?

Don't listen to crazy folk who say things like this. Everyone should play to make beautiful music, not to compare the size of your *ego*.

My opinion..
Martin
I certainly agree. Well said. I do on occasion play with a capo when needed for a particular sound. Mostly, however for practice and my own pleasure, I play some pop tunes and jazz which requires the entire fingerboard.

All that said, there are many, many fine guitar players that use a capo from time to time and it takes nothing away from their skill.
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  #86  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:45 AM
NotveryGood NotveryGood is offline
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I mentioned this a couple of weeks ago, but appropriate to repeat here.
Some years ago I watched a TV talent show, where a guy used a capo. One of the judges went on a rant saying that the contestant couldnt play guitar properly, and had cheated.

Nonsense of course. A capo is a useful tool and enables some excellent things that wouldn't quite sound the same without it. As has been said here ,many of our favourite players use them. For myself, if its good enough for Ian Anderson.......
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  #87  
Old 09-16-2020, 10:02 AM
jaymarsch jaymarsch is offline
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I'll pile on. No, it does not mean that you are a lesser player - more versatile, if you are adept at using them correctly and creatively. As a singer, I rely on them as my voice changes depending on the weather, my mood, my health, etc. If you know how to play in enough keys, the capo can help you find the exact key you need for that day and it can help keep you from over-straining your voice.

As someone else in this thread said, I am a lesser player all by myself without any help from a capo or anything else.

Best,
Jayne
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  #88  
Old 09-16-2020, 10:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polishguitar623 View Post
Years ago one of the first things my jazz guitar teacher told me was to "get rid of the capo mentality." So, yes it seems to be a thing in some circles. I got out of using a capo in part, I suppose, because of this comment ..
If I have had that teacher I probably wouldn't have had a career
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  #89  
Old 09-16-2020, 10:26 AM
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Is there anyone in this thread that supports the belief that a capo make you less of player? Show yourself! haha!
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  #90  
Old 09-16-2020, 10:55 AM
TaoMaas TaoMaas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by min7b5 View Post
If I have had that teacher I probably wouldn't have had a career
I think things are different if you're playing jazz. My first teacher was a jazz player and he wasn't a fan of capos...so naturally I looked at them as somewhat of a crutch, too. But we were playing movable chords almost exclusively....chords that didn't have an open string even when played on the first fret. Once I got older and was exposed to more forms of music, I saw the advantage of capos. Sure, you can play the same notes in a barre chord, but the sound isn't the same.
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