The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY and Write

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 03-29-2018, 08:37 PM
David Rock David Rock is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 189
Default Guitar Zero...

Hello all:

Not 'guitar hero'...'Guitar Zero'...

I recently finished a book called Guitar Zero (Gary Marcus). It is a quick read with little to do about nothing (so to speak). It does have some interesting stuff worth the read. The gist of the book is related to the brainyisms of 'older people' learning music. I've been playing for 20 years now and hope some day to 'get it'. Yes, I am still searching.

Of note on pages 171-172 Gary Marcus congeals the following: "...Whereas errors of novices may be all over the map, errors of experts tend to be of three main types..."

(Not quotes)
1. Simple mistake: "slip of the fingers".

2. Anticipation error: "sort of like saying "I took the store" instead of "I took the car to the store"."

3. Semantic substitution error: playing another note out of melody, but in key (compared to beginners playing whatever the heck comes under their fingers).

I am guessing this all makes me a regular novice expert, or maybe an expert novice.

Another note in this is that a "good" teacher will identify your faults or weaknesses and will make learning fun! (Ouch! Yeah, I want to know and talk in detail about all my weaknesses! What fun. I can't wait till next week.)

Let us all keep learning however we can. Why the heck not? This book is worth the read if for no other reason than to help understand why something so simple can be so hard (at least for me).

Peace,
D
__________________
Slowing down the human race.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-30-2018, 03:34 PM
Johnny K Johnny K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Maryland
Posts: 944
Default

I thought it was pretty good. But I got the audio book on Audible. The author read it and he had some clips of him playing his guitar too. So he did learn something and so did I.
__________________
Just an old drum playing guitarist now.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-30-2018, 04:57 PM
rick-slo's Avatar
rick-slo rick-slo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
Posts: 12,970
Default

Very iffy. His background is psychology apparently. Does he play guitar? - could not find any videos of him doing so.
__________________
Derek Coombs
Website -> Music -> Tabs -> CDs and Youtube
Guitars by Mark Blanchard, Albert&Mueller, Paul Woolson, Collings, Composite Acoustics, and Derek Coombs
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-01-2018, 09:09 AM
SunnyDee SunnyDee is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,031
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rick-slo View Post
Very iffy. His background is psychology apparently. Does he play guitar? - could not find any videos of him doing so.
The point was that he didn't play guitar. He was documenting his learning process, so not supposed to have expertise in that field.

I thought it was interesting. Also used the audiobook. It confirmed for me a lot of what I was seeing learning as a novice adult, especially how the process was very similar to learning a new language as an adult (as in what the OP described among other things). He did have access to a lot of great teachers, though, which I thought made his story a bit less accessible for people who don't. But, still interesting.
__________________
"Militantly left-handed."

Lefty Acoustics

Martin 00-15M
Taylor 320e Baritone

Cheap Righty Classical (played upside down ala Elizabeth Cotten)
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-01-2018, 11:53 PM
funkapus funkapus is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 236
Default

I read this book a few years ago. I was drawn to it because of the author's perspectives as both an adult learner and as an amateur, two things that applied to me. I found it an enjoyable read, but I wouldn't give it more than three stars out of five. My problem with the book is that it spends a lot of time discussing the study of learning, especially adult learning, in a way that suggests some things are settled questions or are resolved/understood when they aren't. As a working scientist myself, I found the facile (and possibly misleading) way in which some things were addressed frustrating. At the same time, though, there was a lot in his descriptions of his efforts to learn guitar that I could recognize in my own struggles, and that was entertaining enough to make the book worthwhile.
__________________
I need more time to play music.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-02-2018, 12:17 AM
rick-slo's Avatar
rick-slo rick-slo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
Posts: 12,970
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyDee View Post
The point was that he didn't play guitar. He was documenting his learning process, so not supposed to have expertise in that field.
Yes, was just checking, and as I thought since I did not agree with any of the 1-2-3 mentioned.
__________________
Derek Coombs
Website -> Music -> Tabs -> CDs and Youtube
Guitars by Mark Blanchard, Albert&Mueller, Paul Woolson, Collings, Composite Acoustics, and Derek Coombs
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-13-2018, 08:47 AM
beninma beninma is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 645
Default

I got this book for my birthday last month. I just finished reading it yesterday.

I found it got fairly obnoxious and almost put it down.

It was starting off well with his personal experiences.. but then it got very annoying in a typical psychology way.. it turned into him lecturing about a bunch of stuff in a pop-psych way from a professorial/expert viewpoint on a subject he just finished telling you he was no expert at. And meanwhile he is constantly reminding you about how privileged he is to have an academic position that pays him to go learn guitar full time for 2 years and he is constantly name dropping all these famous players/teachers he dropped in on.

The way he talks about things that are settled when they are really not strikes me as common in many areas of psychology.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-16-2018, 11:44 AM
tbeltrans tbeltrans is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 4,813
Default

For folks interested in learning and playing music as an adult, there are much better books that are a good and interesting read:

Never Too Late by John Holt:

https://www.amazon.com/Never-Too-Lat...4437409&sr=8-1

Play It Again by Alan Rushbridger:

https://www.amazon.com/Play-Again-Am...ESAV25AZP3XWGQ

Piano Lessons by Noah Adams (the PBS "All Things Considered" guy):

https://www.amazon.com/Piano-Lessons...79ZWGSG66GC3Y6

Making Music For the Joy Of It by Stephanie Judy:

https://www.amazon.com/Making-Music-...+the+joy+of+it

...to name a few. These are not specifically (or even) about guitar, but the instrument is not nearly as important as the whole idea and experience regardless of instrument.

Tony
__________________
Sign here.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-17-2018, 07:25 AM
SprintBob's Avatar
SprintBob SprintBob is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Covington, LA
Posts: 3,256
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by beninma View Post
I got this book for my birthday last month. I just finished reading it yesterday.

I found it got fairly obnoxious and almost put it down.

It was starting off well with his personal experiences.. but then it got very annoying in a typical psychology way.. it turned into him lecturing about a bunch of stuff in a pop-psych way from a professorial/expert viewpoint on a subject he just finished telling you he was no expert at. And meanwhile he is constantly reminding you about how privileged he is to have an academic position that pays him to go learn guitar full time for 2 years and he is constantly name dropping all these famous players/teachers he dropped in on.

The way he talks about things that are settled when they are really not strikes me as common in many areas of psychology.
I had a similar experience in that it really had my interest for a awhile but then it just seemed to bog down because the author seemed to do too much bloviating and it got........boring.
__________________
Collings 0001A (Adi/Mahogany)
Froggy Bottom H-12 (Adi/EIR)
Rainsong CO-WS1005NST (all carbon fiber)
Robinson 12 Fret SS Dread (Spruce/Mahogany)
Santa Cruz Skye 00 (Adi/Coco)
Taylor K-22ce 12 fret (all Koa)
Eastman 810CE (Spruce/Maple archtop)
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY and Write

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=