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Old 11-18-2019, 09:25 AM
Dane Johnson Dane Johnson is offline
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Default CAGED

Looking for suggestions to moving past CAGED system.
There are some strong opinions on why the system sucks, but I have found it benefiting my understanding and an easy entry from chords in soloing.

Any assistance into moving past or ways to advance are welcomed.
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Old 11-18-2019, 09:29 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Where do you want to go? Moving past it to where?

There is an entire world of guitar playing that goes beyond left hand chord fingerings - put this finger here, that finger there to make chord "X".

Last edited by charles Tauber; 11-18-2019 at 09:42 AM.
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Old 11-18-2019, 09:57 AM
JonPR JonPR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dane Johnson View Post
Looking for suggestions to moving past CAGED system.
There are some strong opinions on why the system sucks, but I have found it benefiting my understanding and an easy entry from chords in soloing.

Any assistance into moving past or ways to advance are welcomed.
Presumably, if you're ready to move past it, you can already play every chord in all 12 keys in every part of the neck, along with the major scales of that key? And you can also form all the diatonic 7th chord arpeggios? And maybe know how to add other diatonic extensions to all the other chords?

If not - then CAGED can still assist you to get to that point of total fretboard knowledge. (I mean, you have all the tools to do that.)

If so - then the next stage is chromaticism; which means understanding how to use the 5 notes that are outside the 7 notes of the key.
It's a big topic, but there's essentially two basic aspects of it: melodic and harmonic. If you've done any blues soloing, you'll already have been using melodic chromaticism - adding passing notes from outside the key between notes that are inside. The harmonic kind is using secondary chords and borrowed chords.

Secondary chords are standard in jazz, so some study of jazz chord progressions would be useful there. Pick any jazz progression you like, identify the key, and then find the chords that don't "belong" - i.e., that don't come from the diatonic scale of that key. It's usually only one note in the chord that is outside the key (sometimes two), so the question is: why? That note will be leading by half-step to a note in the next chord, that's why.

If you're not into jazz, then just pick any song you like and work out how to play it all over the fretboard. I.e, use all the varieties of shape CAGED offers you. Then - as an exercise - transpose it to another key. Alternatively, just work out how to improvise on it, using the chord tones and scale patterns between.

One additional area of study might be chord theory, chord symbol language. E.g., if I asked you to play a Bb13 chord, (a) do you know what notes it needs to contain, and (b) how many shapes/positions could you find for it, and how long would it take you? (b) is what CAGED should help you with, but obviously you have to know (a) first.
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Old 11-18-2019, 10:43 AM
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rick-slo rick-slo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Where do you want to go? Moving past it to where?

There is an entire world of guitar playing that goes beyond left hand chord fingerings - put this finger here, that finger there to make chord "X".
Like Charles said. What type of music do you want to be playing and in what way - strumming, fingerstyle, pop songs, blues, jazz, combo of things, ect.?
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Old 11-18-2019, 10:50 AM
Silly Moustache Silly Moustache is online now
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Perhaps, once you have understood CAGED, and managed to fret all the shapes for every possible chord, now you should learn Harmonising the scales?
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  #6  
Old 11-18-2019, 12:01 PM
lppier lppier is offline
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If you play fingerstyle, Martin Taylor has an interesting way of teaching the building up of chords starting from the bass note, harmonizing it with 10ths (3rds up an octave) and then adding 7ths to supplement the sound. The intuition is that you really only need the root note and 3rds to form the chordal tonality (major/minor).
I found this quite interesting to fully understand the fretboard, from a horizontal scale perspective instead of CAGED.
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