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  #1  
Old 03-03-2014, 11:10 PM
Riverwolf Riverwolf is offline
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Default Sliding an open C Major chord to a D chord

Wasn't sure how to word this question, so here goes...
I was watching youtube videos of the Johnny Cash version of the song "Hurt"
Everybody agreed on all the chords and strumming except for variations of the F chord.
Except justinguitar who showed to slide an open C major chord up 1 step or 2 frets in place of the normal open D major chord.
While it's easy enough I'm not sold on the sound yet, still playing with it.
Anybody else use this chord?
I could not find it with a google search.
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:20 PM
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rick-slo rick-slo is offline
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You mean slide plus a barre? Otherwise you just get D and F# notes.
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:52 PM
joeguam joeguam is offline
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Default Sliding an open C Major chord to a D chord

I use this, but only for a specific song and slide a more full C/G up to D/A. For one song, I slide C7 up to D7, but only strum the inner strings.
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Old 03-04-2014, 12:17 AM
ADK ADK is offline
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Liz Phair's Divorce Song is played with that, too. She actually plays all six strings when she plays the D. I find myself using that slide up from C to D quite a bit, but without the E strings. I often prefer it to using a normal D chord when transitioning from C to G.
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Old 03-04-2014, 01:34 AM
Riverwolf Riverwolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick-slo View Post
You mean slide plus a barre? Otherwise you just get D and F# notes.
No, Justin did not barre any strings. He even comments on the sound of the open strings ringing out.
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Old 03-04-2014, 01:52 AM
mr. beaumont mr. beaumont is offline
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That's because with that open G and E ringing, it's not just a D chord...you're adding the 4th and 9th giving you a chord that might be called a Dadd4add9 (no 5) or a few other really complex looking names, depending on context.

The half step interval between the F# and G in that chord...that's what might sound a bit odd to your ears...Some folks really like that sound.

Did Justin really suggest to play that chord but give no name or explanation for it? That's terrible.
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Old 03-04-2014, 03:00 AM
JedClampett JedClampett is offline
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I use that sliding chord a lot,played on a 12- string,it's very effective.
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Old 03-04-2014, 04:29 AM
MICHAEL MYERS MICHAEL MYERS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post

Did Justin really suggest to play that chord but give no name or explanation for it? That's terrible.
Sometimes it's best not to bog beginners down with unnecessary information. It's a chord that can easily substitute for a D major in the context of a song like Hurt. He could say Dadd4add9, but it wouldn't mean anything and wouldn't be retained. An explanation of a C major chord moved up by two frets would be enough for a beginner (if they knew their musical alphabet).
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Old 03-04-2014, 07:09 AM
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ljguitar ljguitar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riverwolf View Post
…While it's easy enough I'm not sold on the sound yet, still playing with it.
…Anybody else use this chord?
Hi rw...

When strumming I often use this C chord when moving up to D:
3-3-2-0-1-0 to 5-5-4-m-3-m …m=mute (Sometimes I play open 1st & 3rd strings instead of muting)

I slide it up 2 frets for a chunky chord as is (actually C-to-D2sus4), or mute the 3rd string with the pad of the middle finger, and 1st string with pad of first finger for a pure and full sounding D/F#. I use it both ways as well as only muting the 3rd string and letting the 1st string ring open for the D.

Really depends on the song/style.

When strumming all 6 strings the 5th of the chord in the bass sounds better than the 3rd.


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Last edited by ljguitar; 03-04-2014 at 07:19 AM. Reason: Corrected something
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Old 03-04-2014, 07:36 AM
clintj clintj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JedClampett View Post
I use that sliding chord a lot,played on a 12- string,it's very effective.
It does sound good on a 12. "Closer to Fine" by the Indigo Girls uses it; she slides a Dadd4add9 down to a C.
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  #11  
Old 03-04-2014, 09:40 AM
Riverwolf Riverwolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MICHAEL MYERS View Post
Sometimes it's best not to bog beginners down with unnecessary information. It's a chord that can easily substitute for a D major in the context of a song like Hurt. He could say Dadd4add9, but it wouldn't mean anything and wouldn't be retained. An explanation of a C major chord moved up by two frets would be enough for a beginner (if they knew their musical alphabet).
Yes, he said it could go by several names but it was not important.
He said it was easier to remember it as a open C sliding.
I really like Justins lessons and would never mean him any disrespect.
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Old 03-04-2014, 10:15 AM
YamaYairi YamaYairi is offline
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I use that chord for playing Jonathan Edwards' "Emma."
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Old 03-04-2014, 10:41 AM
Pualee Pualee is offline
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I don't think I'm talking about the exact same thing, but if you slide open C down two frets, and just strum 2, 3, 4, 5 (6 and 1 are mute) you have a Dadd4.

I'm working on a song that plays G5, followed by this chord, and then resolves with the C major(Hosanna - Paul Baloche). It sounds very nice. I just have some difficulty keeping a steady strum without touching the 1 and 6 string.
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Old 03-04-2014, 11:23 AM
K-vegas K-vegas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riverwolf View Post
Anybody else use this chord?
Yep. I like the sound of it. I use it with open C sliding up to it and also like it used along with an open A. Even wrote a song around it
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Old 03-04-2014, 12:55 PM
mr. beaumont mr. beaumont is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riverwolf View Post
Yes, he said it could go by several names but it was not important.
He said it was easier to remember it as a open C sliding.
I really like Justins lessons and would never mean him any disrespect.
Ah, that's a bit different. I thought he was just saying it was another way to play a D major chord...

I understand there's no reason to bog a beginner down in too much, but I also refuse to treat my beginner students like idiots. Had this chord come up in a lesson with me, I would have given the chord name, tell the student memorizing the whole fancy name isn't as important as understanding that in this case, it's replacing a regular D major chord, and it's giving us a couple of extra notes which make it sound more "colorful."

If that's confusing, the student should probably stick to Guitar Hero.
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