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  #1  
Old 09-17-2021, 02:02 PM
nick82 nick82 is offline
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Default Help me identify this parlor guitar

Hi All,

I took a gamble, and bought this guitar online.
It was advertised as unknown parlor guitar from the 60s.

There is no brand indication on the guitar. The label on the headstock is from a store in Italy where the guitar was sold (probably second hand).

The back looks solid wood (looking at the crack where the black grain seems to continue on the side).

It would be really nice if I can find some more information about this guitar, and about its age... Who can give me some clues?


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  #2  
Old 09-17-2021, 08:24 PM
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton is online now
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Judging from the bridge, it’s a European-made guitar, probably German or Italian. It’s fairly old.

How old, I couldn’t venture. Older rather than newer is about all I can say.

Sorry I can’t help you with a brand name or anything specific.


Wade Hampton Miller
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Old 09-18-2021, 06:36 AM
nick82 nick82 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wade Hampton View Post
Judging from the bridge, it’s a European-made guitar, probably German or Italian. It’s fairly old.

How old, I couldn’t venture. Older rather than newer is about all I can say.

Sorry I can’t help you with a brand name or anything specific.


Wade Hampton Miller
Thanks for the reply Wade.
Any idea about the woods used? The top looks like spruce? But what about the back?
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  #4  
Old 09-18-2021, 07:21 AM
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Song Song is offline
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https://reverb.com/item/38345880-unk...na-black-limba

Quote:
"On the headstock it says: "M.Morutto" which is NOT the producer of the instrument. In fact, Morutto was just the Guitar shop it came from (Torino, Italy)"


It may be made by EKO or some other local shop that M.Murotto re-branded or the paper tags fell off.


https://reverb.com/item/32874353-eko...963-honeyburst


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Old 09-18-2021, 09:20 AM
ship of fools ship of fools is offline
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Default To me

It looks like an early Lacote the French and Italians used what I call the smiley bridge and I would guess the 1880's and there abouts.
And even looking at the tuners as to who made it well good luck with that but the bridge with no saddle makes me lean more towards the Italian side.
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Old 09-19-2021, 07:59 AM
nick82 nick82 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Song View Post
It may be made by EKO or some other local shop that M.Murotto re-branded or the paper tags fell off.
Not that convinced about the Eko. The body shape looks different to me. Also, different headstock shape, no eko brand on the tuners (most seem to have), neck looks one piece instead of 3 pieces glued together…

Quote:
Originally Posted by ship of fools View Post
It looks like an early Lacote the French and Italians used what I call the smiley bridge and I would guess the 1880's and there abouts.
And even looking at the tuners as to who made it well good luck with that but the bridge with no saddle makes me lean more towards the Italian side.
The body shape indeed looks very similar! But to be that old it would need bar frets i guess, which i don’t think it has. I will inspect more closely on arrival..
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Old 09-20-2021, 12:24 AM
RogerHaggstrom RogerHaggstrom is offline
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The tuners put's it in the 1920s or 1930s. The mustache bridge is an old design on a new guitar (for the time). It must be made in Italy, the name plate and also the design of the neck heel.

The dot on the 10th fret is a bit confusing and banjo like, maybe it's from the 1920s when the banjo was popular.
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Old 09-20-2021, 01:58 AM
RomanS RomanS is offline
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Dot on the 10th fret was very common on European guitars from before WW II, and is still found on most manouche ("gypsy jazz") guitars.
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Old 09-21-2021, 12:57 AM
RogerHaggstrom RogerHaggstrom is offline
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Looking at it again and knowing about the gypsy jazz guitar connection, it is possible it is made in France.
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