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Old 01-29-2022, 04:24 AM
Davis Webb Davis Webb is offline
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Default Time and Body Healing vs Medical Intervention

Tough one to call. As we get older... stuff breaks. Some things we do the medical thing. Some things watch and wait. Some things,wishful thinking and ignore as long as there is no pain. Some things preventable.

How do you balance this?
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Old 01-29-2022, 04:42 AM
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Good question, and certainly a process!

This has been the year for me when stuff has started to break. I have been in great health until this past year - years of being a competitive athlete has finally reared its head.

I have done watchful waiting, and also been down the medical intervention route. In short, trying to dodge surgery on both my hips (not replacements), which requires 6-8 weeks non-weight bearing, per hip. Ugh!

I have settled on taking some time off from work, engaging in some dedicated time to my health, and seeing what happens over the course of 3 months.

While my issues are certainly not life-threatening, they have greatly impacted my daily life, mobility, and have caused chronic pain - all frustrating. Through PT, lessening stress, diet changes, some weight loss, etc., I hope to avoid going under the knife.

In the end, my body will tell me which direction to go next. For now, I think I have one last shot at modifying my lifestyle, and giving my body the attention it deserves.
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Old 01-29-2022, 07:04 AM
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Old 01-29-2022, 07:58 AM
AndreF AndreF is offline
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Quote:
How do you balance this?
It's a good question. An important one.
I think the older we get the smarter we become about what constitutes a medical issue in need of intervention. You also accumulate a lot of knowledge as you age, and wisdom hopefully, about yourself from that point of view. I've been active in sports most of my life so I have my share of wear and tear issues, but fortunately no pain anywhere.
When I overdo it, inflammation sets in, which can lead to overuse associated pain. It's the kind of thing that rarely happened when I was young, but is directly linked to the age process. Makes sense. That's the time to back off and let your body heal itself.
You can mitigate a lot of that by taking good care of yourself as you get older. It starts with proper nutrition, combined with an exercise program involving cardio and some weight training, and plenty of flexibility, stretching and balance routines. That goes a long way to keeping medical intervention issues under wraps and letting yourself heal after inevitable mishaps. (like shoveling too much snow )
As does routine medical and dental checkups.
Beyond that, your body and mind should be able to flag more serious circumstances which would require additional medical help. Like a sudden pain or condition that is new to you and otherwise surprising. That would be a good time to seek help.
That's how I balance things mostly, but other people have different circumstances and routines to help them through these issues I'm sure.
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Old 01-29-2022, 07:59 AM
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For most of the stuff that breaks, your body will give you the message that action is required before a disaster occurs. However, as we age a lot of bad things that happen are insidious and can sneak up on you. At least once a year it's a good idea to have a complete physical with labs to put professional eyes on the sneaky stuff. The medical pros can help you navigate the path between benign neglect/healing and active intervention. The old adage concerning the law ("He who acts as his own lawyer has a fool for a client.") is equally applicable in the medical field if you replace the word "lawyer" with "doctor".
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Old 01-29-2022, 08:07 AM
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“Wishful thinking and ignore” is an ill advised approach. Particularly if you are over 40 years of age.
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Old 01-29-2022, 09:15 AM
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I think it's more like dealing with it not so much balance anything. My body tells me what I can do and what I can't. Some things it's a matter of using it or losing it, to a point.

You will not believe this story. This started last week. My wife decided it was time to get a bladder issue taken care of before she gets much older. We're 68. Check up, and test, test, test. While I'm going what? What? What? Then we had to drive a hundred miles to get set up with surgery to get an ovarian cyst the size of a basketball removed this coming Wednesday. She takes very good care of herself and is not that big. Dealing with stuff like this is what life is all about.

I did get to visit some music stores and play some good guitars though.
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Old 01-29-2022, 10:00 AM
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Mr. Jelly, I hope everything goes ok with your wife, and good news it is a cyst and not something worse!

(Not relating at all to Mr. Jelly’s situation)
I am a physician, a neurologist, and work with many older patients. I would generalize that most people have no or little insight into what their bodies have been telling them for years, no to little insight about what constitutes reasonable diet, exercise and health and have landed in quite difficult situations because of it.

Here in the US, we are not taught about or guided in any way about these things. Rather, it is your prerogative to do as you please and “western medicine will take care of it”.

Big mistake.

Western medicine does crap. We are good at rescuing desperate situations and using chemicals to mask symptoms or regulate dysfunction, but we are terrible at curing many diseases or learning how to prevent them. Sure we are making progress with cancer, but why is it there in the first place? We are losing ground with bacteria and have never done well with viruses.

Much of what I do involves parenting adults through difficult circumstance, placating symptoms and giving bad news. The occasions that I really, truly change a condition are infrequent but very rewarding.
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Old 01-29-2022, 10:08 AM
godfreydaniel godfreydaniel is offline
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I had problems caused by low B12 levels. Went undiagnosed for two years, by that point I felt like I was 90 years old (I was 60 at the time). A numb toe finally peaked my doctor’s interest, and had me tested.

This is particularly important if you’ve ever been on Nexium (or any acid blockers) for an extended period of time, as I was. That’s nasty stuff, and should be avoided.
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Old 01-29-2022, 10:14 AM
AndreF AndreF is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamolay View Post

Western medicine does crap. We are good at rescuing desperate situations and using chemicals to mask symptoms or regulate dysfunction, but we are terrible at curing many diseases or learning how to prevent them.
I agree with this wholeheartedly.
Western medicine is always about finding out what the symptoms are, and treating them, usually with medicine. Rarely is the question asked or addressed: Why did this condition appear to begin with? Which is much more important when it comes to true healing.
Eastern philosophies about medicine are much more geared towards the why, and not differentiating so much between the mind and the body, but treating it as one.
I came to a better understanding of this after reading Bill Moyer's fine book: "Healing and the Mind" years ago. It was an eye opener.
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Old 01-29-2022, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamolay View Post

Here in the US, we are not taught about or guided in any way about these things. Rather, it is your prerogative to do as you please and “western medicine will take care of it”.

Big mistake.
Sadly true. I had a 40 year community pharmacy practice where I tried to educate patients regarding basic health information (the importance of monitoring blood pressure regularly, the risks of obesity and the difference between a healthy and unhealthy diet, the benefits of exercise on mind and body, etc.). I was continually astounded at the general lack of understanding of these core medical concepts by the public. Being proactive with one's health seemed to be a lost concept. The most frequent and disconcerting question that I heard as a pharmacist was, "Isn't there just a pill I can take for this?"
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Old 01-29-2022, 12:02 PM
DanR DanR is offline
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This topic is rather timely for me. I'm 68. In November of 2020, I hurt my shoulder weight lifting and I was basically just bench pressing light dumbbells. I might have been lifting too fast because the weight was light and I felt a pop and a pain in my shoulder. For almost a year, I couldn't lift my right arm above my head without pain. I figured I should get it looked at, but I'm a huge procrastinator and never got around to it.

About 2 months ago, I tripped over my dog while walking him. Luckily (and coincidentally, my dog's name is Lucky) I was able to land on a lawn and not the sidewalk. I landed hard on my right side and did some damage to my ribs. I googled rib injuries and also talked to a friend who's a nurse and there's really not much to be done for the ribs until the soreness goes away. Since the injury happened, I have not been able to sleep in my bed because of rib pain. So I have been sleeping for a few hours almost sitting up in a Lazy Boy and then ending up on my left side on the couch.

Anyhow, my latest sleeping arrangement has been therapeutic to both my ribs and my shoulder. Today is the first day I noticed absolutely no rib pain. And my shoulder is 90% better and I can lift my arm above my head without pain. I figured the rib injury would heal without medical intervention but it seems that my shoulder has healed as well.
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Old 01-30-2022, 04:54 AM
Davis Webb Davis Webb is offline
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There are interventions and time heals all approaches.

Interventions: What the doctor wants, makes sense, logic good, Tx are there. That is the pro. The con is risk of side effects, discomfort, anxiety and loss of a feeling of control.

Time Heals All: Can be risky but in my parents case, both of them ignored medical help. My father had a non Hodgkins lymphoma in his lungs and the urged Tx. He lost most use of his voice for 2 years. He refused to enter the medical game. His voice returned, lived until 87 and passed due to a fall, healthy otherwise.

My mother, multiple problems, prolapses, hyperthyroidism and then some. She ignored medical system entry and lived til over 90 when she died peacefully in her sleep from dementia..yes, its fatal.

I am tending more toward the time heals all. There are times, like during kidney stones when you need a bit of meds. But even then, time is healing all.

My fear is that health services for people over 65 are excessive and over medicated.

One friend went for a visit for a checkup, they found low iron. Gave her an Iron infusion IV that day. IV get infected, she reported it, this patient is 84. The nurse said, oh, thats just redness, that happens, its okay. It was infected. The infection spread to her heart. It damaged the valves from endocarditis. Now they wanted to do open heart surgery to repair the valves.

She said NO MORE, left their care and 5 years later is happy.

So after 65 medical solutions get pushed on us because we are falling apart. But in my experience, and I do work with seniors a lot in training and curriculum for caregivers...is that leaving them alone and making them pain free is core. The poking, prodding, excising, taking bloods, admissions....

Can be worse then the illness.

Do some of you agree with this?
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Old 01-30-2022, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis Webb View Post

One friend went for a visit for a checkup, they found low iron. Gave her an Iron infusion IV that day. IV get infected, she reported it, this patient is 84. The nurse said, oh, thats just redness, that happens, its okay. It was infected. The infection spread to her heart. It damaged the valves from endocarditis. Now they wanted to do open heart surgery to repair the valves.

The poking, prodding, excising, taking bloods, admissions....

Can be worse then the illness.

Do some of you agree with this?
I do. What you described above happens more often than not. And it's a travesty.
The best outcome is a combination of not being intimidated and feeling overwhelmed, and making a point of involving yourself as best and intensively as you can in the decision making process. That, and having a good doctor and or medical personnel you can trust, i.e. people that have your best health interests at heart, first and foremost. And not the bottom line.
They are still around. Thankfully.
I'm hoping too that they don't relax the rules too much about who can become a doctor. Getting through medical school has always been a rigorous process. I hope it stays that way.
I'm also hoping that they learn more about treating people as individuals, with varied histories, rather than just following one size fits all protocols, especially with diseases like cancer. That's equally important to the new therapies they might now be discovering due to emerging technologies.
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Old 01-30-2022, 08:33 AM
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My friend lost his brother last week to an untreated urinary tract infection. He didn't want to go to the hospital. When his wife finally forced him to go it was too late.

On the other hand I've learned a lot more about type 2 diabetes than I ever wanted to know. I've gotten some really bad advice from primary care physicians before finding a great specialist. It's a deadly disease that most often doesn't involve pain until it is way too late and good medical advice is essential.

My takeaway is that it's important to be involved with one's own care and be willing to go beyond the advice of any one physician. They are human and can't know everything. They also can't possibly care more about your health than you do.
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