The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY and Write

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #31  
Old 06-12-2024, 10:52 AM
Blueser100's Avatar
Blueser100 Blueser100 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: California
Posts: 5,057
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by reeve21 View Post
I love to listen to ragtime guitar. My efforts at playing it pretty much ended with Richard Saslow's book, very rudimentary stuff. I crashed and burned on Joplin, etc.

This is great for folks wanting to dip their toe into it.....https://www.amazon.com/New-Art-Ragti...rmat=4&depth=1
Same here! Both my Saslow and Joplin books are collecting dust after my failed efforts. I’ll stick to easier Piedmont blues.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 06-12-2024, 04:43 PM
zombywoof zombywoof is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 9,399
Default

One of the best ragtime players I ever heard was Eric Schoenberg. His 1971 LP "The New Ragtime Guitar" with David Laibman is just jaw dropping good. I was lucky enough to catch him at the Town Crier Cafe just after the LP was released.

I have kept a few rags in my setlist for decades though. Tunes such as Rev. Davis' "Cincinnati Flow Rag" and Etta Baker's "Knoxville Rag."
__________________
"You start off playing guitars to get girls & end up talking with middle-aged men about your fingernails" - Ed Gerhard
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 06-12-2024, 04:52 PM
Annie B Annie B is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2023
Posts: 88
Default Piedmont blues book?

[QUOTE=I’ll stick to easier Piedmont blues.[/QUOTE]

Any books you'd recommend to learn Piedmont blues style?
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 06-12-2024, 09:08 PM
Skip Ellis Skip Ellis is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,432
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Jelly View Post
I play rags, old jazz and blues. Classical ragtime, no. My favorite band is Tuba Skinny, YouTube them. I do allot of the same material as a solo performer. I have kind of an aggressive Roy Bookbinder type of style. I quit flatpicking and dedicated my learning to fingerpicking some years back when I semi-retired. I probably play a song or two of all the old Piedmont style players. Throw in an old country and a jug band tune here and there and I'm good. I play most things in the Piedmont style though.
HUGE Tuba Skinny fan here. They're always great and greater when Erika is with them.
__________________
2022 Brook Lyn Custom, 2014 Martin 000-18, 2022 Ibanez GB10, several homebrew Teles, Evans RE200 amp, Quilter 101R and various speaker cabinets,
Very understanding wife of 48 years
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 06-12-2024, 10:38 PM
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,483
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie B View Post
Any books you'd recommend to learn Piedmont blues style?
There may be books that I'm not aware of but I can recommend Ari Eisingers' instructional Blind Blake video found at Stephen Grossmans' Guitar Workshop. Comes with a PDF.
__________________
2012 OM18 Authentic 1933
2022 00028 Modern Deluxe
2011 Eastman E10 Slope Shoulder
2011 Recording King ROS 626
2020 National NRP Tricone
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 06-13-2024, 01:55 AM
JonPR JonPR is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 6,498
Default

The first guitar player that really blew me away was Cliff Aungier, who played in an aggressive bluesy-ragtime style. As I later discovered, somewhere between Big Bill Broonzy and Blind Blake, neither of whom I'd heard of back then. I'd been playing just 6 months at that point (mid-1966), and was making my first hesitant steps towards the sweeter Donovan/Bert Jansch alternating bass style.

I started going to folk clubs (in London), '67-68, where I saw equally amazing players like Gerry Lockran, John James and Stefan Grossman. I learned to play Dallas Rag off Grossman's first album, slowing it to half-speed with a tape deck. I didn't play it very well, but I could play it! My first Blind Blake tune would have been Diddy Wah Diddy, maybe a year or two after that.

Here's a tune Aungier once played on a radio session in '67 (never on an album) which I taped and set about learning. Really just a Broonzy-esque blues jam, but I was never too precious about the generic boundaries between "blues" and "ragtime" - I liked the stuff which straddled both camps. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QtLj3pY2aw

(Much as I loved Bert Jansch, that was always more about his songwriting than his guitar playing. He was obviously an amazing player, but on a more introspective level. Ragtime was more exciting!)
__________________
"There is a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in." - Leonard Cohen.

Last edited by JonPR; 06-13-2024 at 02:01 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 06-13-2024, 07:17 AM
Mr. Jelly's Avatar
Mr. Jelly Mr. Jelly is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sioux City, Iowa
Posts: 7,963
Default

Mary Flowers and Craig Ventresco are two to check out. Both take my breath away .... in their own style.
__________________
Waterloo WL-S, K & K mini
Waterloo WL-S Deluxe, K & K mini
Iris OG, 12 fret, slot head, K & K mini

Creativity comes more easily with a good dose of fool
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 06-16-2024, 07:56 AM
Blueser100's Avatar
Blueser100 Blueser100 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: California
Posts: 5,057
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Jelly View Post
Mary Flowers and Craig Ventresco are two to check out. Both take my breath away .... in their own style.
Mary Flower is a treasure. I had a chance to see her perform and participate in a small workshop she taught at McCabe’s in Los Angeles a few years ago.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 06-16-2024, 09:25 AM
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,483
Default Sunday morning musing

It has occurred to me that there are no Blind Blake songs that are in the key of A or E which are common blues keys.

His songs were all played in the first position, up tempo and the majority are in G or C major. He was a very prolific writer and I continually come across things he has written that I wasn't aware of so I could be wrong.

I don't think he has any songs in Spanish (open G). Is Police Dog Blues in Sevastopol tuning (open E) a one-off? Chump Man Blues is in Dropped D I think.
__________________
2012 OM18 Authentic 1933
2022 00028 Modern Deluxe
2011 Eastman E10 Slope Shoulder
2011 Recording King ROS 626
2020 National NRP Tricone

Last edited by Bluenose; 06-16-2024 at 02:02 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 06-16-2024, 09:31 AM
rick-slo's Avatar
rick-slo rick-slo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
Posts: 17,369
Default

I have a mix of music influences. One that incorporates a ragtime feel is my tune "Six String Shuffle":

__________________
Derek Coombs
Youtube -> Website -> Music -> Tabs
Guitars by Mark Blanchard, Albert&Mueller, Paul Woolson, Collings, Composite Acoustics, and Derek Coombs

"Reality is that which when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."

Woods hands pick by eye and ear
Made to one with pride and love
To be that we hold so dear
A voice from heavens above
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY and Write

Thread Tools





All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=