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  #31  
Old 06-11-2024, 10:43 AM
Puddleglum Puddleglum is offline
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Originally Posted by rllink View Post
You ever notice that most of the British bands from the sixties and seventies, you can't hear the British accent when they sing. I'm thinking the Beatles and the Stones, but there are others. I wonder why that is? I'm sure they are not doing it on purpose.
I’ve always heard they dropped them to sound more American in order to appeal to a larger audience. FWIW, I can absolutely hear the Brit accents in the Beatles, Stones, etc. But slightly dropping a Brit accent isn’t the same thing as pronouncing words like “good” as “goo-id,” etc.
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  #32  
Old 06-11-2024, 10:45 AM
Puddleglum Puddleglum is offline
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I'm not hearing it. Why don't you record both of these songs the way you think they would be better and we could hear the comparison?
Wow. Perhaps people hear things differently. Keane has already recorded the first song like it was supposed to sound. The second one is an original sung in that odd style.
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  #33  
Old 06-11-2024, 11:05 AM
bfm612 bfm612 is offline
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Originally Posted by Puddleglum View Post
Wow. Perhaps people hear things differently. Keane has already recorded the first song like it was supposed to sound. The second one is an original sung in that odd style.
I may not be able to tell the difference between rosewood and mahogany or European white vs sitka spruce, but I can hear THIS, and I feel like I'm much worse off this way!
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  #34  
Old 06-11-2024, 11:09 AM
TheGITM TheGITM is offline
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Is this an example of you being curious or judgmental?
Whatever/whichever you prefer, I suppose. I find that I have the most difficulty not being judgmental with regard to people that are being incredibly judgmental. So, yeah, whatever/whichever you prefer. I'm okay with it.
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  #35  
Old 06-11-2024, 11:18 AM
Puddleglum Puddleglum is offline
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Whatever/whichever you prefer, I suppose. I find that I have the most difficulty not being judgmental with regard to people that are being incredibly judgmental. So, yeah, whatever/whichever you prefer. I'm okay with it.
Ok, I’ll go with judgmental.
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  #36  
Old 06-11-2024, 11:39 AM
rokdog49 rokdog49 is offline
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Originally Posted by bfm612 View Post
Well, these artists are typically great singers, at the very least technically. I'd listen more to their work if I liked the artistic choices. There are many singers who might not even be the best singers technically, but they're compelling because maybe their phrasing is unique and works well for the song they're singing. For me, cursive singing functions in the opposite way and instead tends to be detrimental to the vocal. It's also so very frequently used that it comes off to me more as mimicry and formulaic.
They are. If you’ve ever heard Alanis Morrisette or Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders sing other music in their straightforward vocal styles it’s amazing what talented vocalists they truly are.
What they do with pop music is what sells and it’s their own personality they are exuding.
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  #37  
Old 06-11-2024, 12:27 PM
A Scot in Otley A Scot in Otley is offline
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Originally Posted by Puddleglum View Post
@Silly Moustache and @casualmusic

Accents don’t bother me at all (I have a Texas accent and happen to love Brit, Irish, Scottish, and especially Welsh accents), but fake accents sound pretentious to me and are a genuine turn off. The way that young lady is singing doesn’t have anything to do with her being from the Philippines. And the guy’s singing doesn’t have anything to do with him being British. Both are part of some odd modern way of singing that I personally find unbearable. I must be in the minority, and I’m ok with that, but I genuinely wondered if anyone else noticed this in modern vox.

@Silly Moustache: Come on, man, do you honestly think I don’t realize that music is made up of an international cast, or we were just trying to be extra nice to me? I could provide you examples of Americans singing like this as well. To my ear, they all sound equally ridiculous.



…EDIT…

To prove my point about this having nothing to do with these people not being American, listen to this example from Selena Gomez:

https://youtu.be/1TsVjvEkc4s?feature=shared

I don’t like that kind of music and wouldn’t be able to make it through the whole song, but note how she pronounces the word “good” here. It’s indicative of exactly what I’m talking about. The singers in the other videos I posted are doing the very same thing. It’s a real *thing* and it’s not just me being some bigoted American picking on foreign singers.
Aye up, Puddlegum. In the spirit of sticking up for the oppressed, I hear you and feel your pain. I think this is just, as you - and even our southern Saxon moustachiod friend hinted, as just 'fashionable' garbling. I don't hear this stuff outside recorded videos etc, and certainly not from any of the humungously talented artists on whom I've clapped eyes (and lent me ears to) recently. Even in the fashionably 'alt folk' live scene, I haven't heard that mangling. If they had to sing acoustically, they would be the subject of head shaking, and surreptitious eye rolling, and people sneaking out at each song ending.

I am speaking as someone, who has supported some talented people, and has been the subject of the odd query such as, 'you don't sound Scottish when you're singing'. Breathe deeply ... resist the Celtic genes telling me to emotionally unload ... and relax That's just how it is.

Mind you, there is also a Scottish folk voice thing going on in Scotland where I hear artists singing in this weird Scottish accent that doesn't seem to relate to any geographical area (to me at any rate). Sounds like some broad style accent that is supposed to give some folky legitimacy. I don't know, but I heard a guy from where I originally came from who was singing like that and thought ... ($%&£ ...expurgated thought) He then spoke completely differently. My point? Bugger if I know, but there is all kinds of weird stuff about. Keep the faith and have a wee dram and relax.
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  #38  
Old 06-11-2024, 01:13 PM
J Patrick J Patrick is offline
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Vocal affection is nuthin new…Mick Jagger has been affecting a southern U.S. accent for well over a half century…..and he wouldn’t sound quite right if he didn’t on a lot of his songs….

As for the video….very nice but that particular vocal style is so prevalent these days that it just doesn’t grab me….it’s a nice voice but there’s nothing special or different about it…
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  #39  
Old 06-11-2024, 05:55 PM
boombox boombox is offline
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Originally Posted by Puddleglum View Post
I’ve always heard they dropped them to sound more American in order to appeal to a larger audience. FWIW, I can absolutely hear the Brit accents in the Beatles, Stones, etc. But slightly dropping a Brit accent isn’t the same thing as pronouncing words like “good” as “goo-id,” etc.
I'm with the OP on all this affected singing - does nothing for me. Similarly the f-o-r-c-e-d brea--th-less singing also irritates me along with the use of autotune to the extent that any vocal individuality is gone - especially when I know the artist can actually sing, but feels compelled to follow the crowd!

But just for fun, I defy anyone not to hear the British accent here

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  #40  
Old 06-11-2024, 06:44 PM
Puddleglum Puddleglum is offline
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Originally Posted by boombox View Post
I'm with the OP on all this affected singing - does nothing for me. Similarly the f-o-r-c-e-d brea--th-less singing also irritates me along with the use of autotune to the extent that any vocal individuality is gone - especially when I know the artist can actually sing, but feels compelled to follow the crowd!

But just for fun, I defy anyone not to hear the British accent here

Actually, I now remember hearing years ago that the early Brit bands were trying to sound more American since Rock and Roll was an American thing and they were mimicking the sounds they heard. This seems plausible.

On topic, I honestly have a hard time believing some of you guys here cannot hear this odd accent in these songs. I don't understand how you can NOT hear it. But the "breathless" and autotune thing is apparently lost on me. Can someone post a sample of this? Maybe I've heard it and just don't know what I'm listening to.
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  #41  
Old 06-11-2024, 09:31 PM
schmalex schmalex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddleglum View Post
I’ve always heard they dropped them to sound more American in order to appeal to a larger audience. FWIW, I can absolutely hear the Brit accents in the Beatles, Stones, etc. But slightly dropping a Brit accent isn’t the same thing as pronouncing words like “good” as “goo-id,” etc.
Most trained singers are specifically taught to emphasize vowel sounds over consonants, as vowels keep the mouth open and the air flowing, while consonants by their nature cut-off the air / sound.

So in the case of a word like "good" you literally cannot continue singing the word once you hit that closed off, tongue against the roof of the mouth, "d" sound. Try using the word "good" in the middle of a legato singing phrase, and it is nearly impossible without de-emphasizing the "d" sound in some way.

I personally find myself much more annoyed by the more modern "Broadway" singing styles that really overemphasize articulation at the expense of more natural ways of singing.

Last edited by schmalex; 06-13-2024 at 02:54 PM.
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