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  #16  
Old 02-22-2019, 10:35 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar george View Post
What type of buffer should be used? Can it be attached to an electric drill? What material is the buffing wheel made of? What stiffness should it be, etc.?
As Steve wrote:

"Just think of buffing as very find sanding..." Any method that performs that fine sanding. The most common are progressively finer abrasive sheets ("sandpaper") and/or progressively finer abrasive compounds.

Abrasive sheets go from the incredibly coarse 20 grit to incredibly fine 12000 (or higher) grits. Some have waterproof backings, for use with lubricants. For finish repair, one often starts with 1500 or so and works progressively finer, each finer abrasive removing the scratches left by the previous abrasive.

Abrasive "rubbing" compounds can be purchased as an abrasive suspended in liquid or as solid blocks. Compounds are available from quite coarse to very fine. Most guitar "polishes" are a very fine abrasive in a liquid "vehicle". The liquid compounds are typically "rubbed" by hand with a cloth, with a foam polishing pad in a hand-held drill or drill press or an automotive-style polisher with a bonnet. The solid blocks are typically applied to the wheels of a stand-style polisher and the guitar "presented" to the buffing wheels.

The above are used in various combinations that vary from one person to the next. For example, it is common to use buffing wheels with a solid compound and finish-off with finer liquid compounds that are worked by hand or with a polishing machine. One chooses the combination that works best for them and their situation/environment.
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  #17  
Old 03-04-2019, 11:21 AM
Victory Pete Victory Pete is offline
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I had learned the hard way a long time ago that buffing out a dent will only work if the dent is very shallow, also even if you do get the dent leveled to the surrounding finish you probably will see a visible depression in reflected light. A dent really needs to be filled then leveled for a invisible repair.
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  #18  
Old 03-05-2019, 01:56 AM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Originally Posted by roadbiker View Post
I am curious to understand how Taylor rubbed the ding out of my 814 (which was a little more noticable). Is it buffed with compound and then polished? It's really not that important to me because the ding is so small, but I am curious how they do it. I rubbed it with Guitar Finish Restore Plus (a great product, BTW), and that seemed to minimize the ding!
I buffed out this ding today, the trick to getting a good finish is all the inbetween steps that no one sees ,



Up close



Some buffing



All gone

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  #19  
Old 03-05-2019, 03:43 AM
perttime perttime is offline
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A minor ding just adds character.

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  #20  
Old 03-05-2019, 04:28 AM
grandstick grandstick is offline
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Originally Posted by perttime View Post
A minor ding just adds character.





Aw, that guitar is all Gommed up.
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  #21  
Old 03-05-2019, 04:30 AM
rmp rmp is offline
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Taylor finishes I think are harder to fix, it's really a good idea if you can to let them, or an authorized warranty center look at it.

I had a mic fall and hit my Grand Symphony behind the bridge and it gouged a 6 inch long valley down to the end of the top. it was hideous. Sent it to Taylor, and the repair was remarkable. The also found a 2 braces that needed to be reset and took care of a few minor setup issues I never resolved.

It took some time, they had the guitar for about 9 weeks, (I have others, so not a big deal there)

I I needed anything fix on that guitar in the future, I'd do it again.

They are fantastic.
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  #22  
Old 03-05-2019, 06:46 AM
perttime perttime is offline
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Originally Posted by grandstick View Post
Aw, that guitar is all Gommed up.

Recent photos still show him with Wilma, although he has the new signature guitar from Lowden.
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  #23  
Old 03-05-2019, 10:46 AM
roadbiker roadbiker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodger Knox View Post
In answer to the original question, a buffer is used to buff out the ding. Finish is applied thick enough to remove some in the final sanding and buffing.

If the ding is shallow enough to remove it and the finish around it without going through the finish, then it can be buffed out.
That is what I suspected. Thanx
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