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  #31  
Old 02-06-2022, 09:09 AM
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Mr. Jelly Mr. Jelly is offline
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It sounds like you are doing great to me.

I noticed that not all the fingers press the strings of a chord at the same exact time. There seems to be a guide or leading finger and the others follow when forming a chord. Watch how you do it and utilize that knowledge when you make chord changes. By doing this you will have a conscious idea of your chord changing mechanics. You'll know exactly which is the first finger to be moved and where to, to start the chord you are changing to. After doing this and a little practice you won't need to think about it anymore.
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  #32  
Old 02-06-2022, 02:11 PM
OzzieMikie OzzieMikie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Jelly View Post
It sounds like you are doing great to me.

I noticed that not all the fingers press the strings of a chord at the same exact time. There seems to be a guide or leading finger and the others follow when forming a chord. Watch how you do it and utilize that knowledge when you make chord changes. By doing this you will have a conscious idea of your chord changing mechanics. You'll know exactly which is the first finger to be moved and where to, to start the chord you are changing to. After doing this and a little practice you won't need to think about it anymore.
Currently, I'm only forming a couple of chords with all fingers landing on the strings at the same time. Most, however, are behaving as you described...first one, then another, and so on.

My instructor is having me focus on two things:

1. Don't even peek at my right hand. He says I'll soon get a "feel" for the strings/pick and be able to start strumming on the correct string. (I should also mention he has me playing the root note of the chord by itself, then strumming the rest of the strings.

2. He's getting me to form chords with my fingers landing on the frets closest to the high E string, then forming the rest of the chord in order down to the low E string. Doing it this way, he says, allows a (small) bit of time for the rest of the chord when strumming (since we're so far doing only down strums).

I'm still hanging with it so far!

Last edited by OzzieMikie; 02-08-2022 at 03:03 PM.
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  #33  
Old 02-08-2022, 03:17 PM
OzzieMikie OzzieMikie is offline
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Thus far in my "journey" I know the following chords:

A
E
G
D
C

The above I've listed in their order of difficulty regarding switching from one chord to another.

D gives me occasional issues for two reasons: (1) Starting the strum on the D string. I often hit the string above or below that string for some reason. (2) My middle finger is bent as far as I can bend it in order to fret the high E string without muting the B string next to it.

C gives me issues because all my fingers have to move when playing this chord (in a I, IV, V progression in the key of G). And because it's a bit of a stretch (for me, anyway) between the first and 4th frets.

Those reading this carefully will note an F chord isn't even listed above. I try it a couple times a day to no avail. Gonna have to be patient with this one, I think. Perhaps my instructor will be able to "unlock the technique" for me...LOL.

LOL...something tells me I'm not "gifted" on a guitar, and will have to practice my butt off to attain any sort of proficiency that would allow me to consider myself a "guitar player".
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  #34  
Old 02-08-2022, 03:28 PM
reeve21 reeve21 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzieMikie View Post
LOL...something tells me I'm not "gifted" on a guitar, and will have to practice my butt off to attain any sort of proficiency that would allow me to consider myself a "guitar player".
You've been playing for just over a month now.

That's like half a second in guitar time

The is no substitute for putting in the time. Most people who eventually learn to play don't have a particular gift for it, they are just too stubborn to give up after a month or a year or 10 years.

You can do it!
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  #35  
Old 02-08-2022, 03:53 PM
MinorKey MinorKey is offline
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Try playing the 7th chords instead (A7, D7 and E7)

Less fingers involved and it sounds more bluesy.

A7 (X02020) I
D7 (XX0212) IV
E7 (020100) V
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  #36  
Old 02-17-2022, 03:56 PM
Jkruger Jkruger is offline
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I think you're doing well.
I'm 58 yrs. old and 14 months into this journey.
I suck bad!!... But I keep on going. Also to stubborn to quit!
Stay at it bro.
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  #37  
Old 02-18-2022, 10:47 AM
OzzieMikie OzzieMikie is offline
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I truly appreciate all the encouragement!

Still "whittling away" at this.

As yet am unable to play either the "baby" F chord (XX3211) or the "full" F chord (133211).

I'm having an argument with my fretting fingers, I think. When trying the small F chord and flattening my index finger over the B and high E strings, my ring finger insists on dropping down just enough to mute the B string. Doesn't seem to matter if I fret the D and G strings first, then barre the B and high E strings, or barre the B/high E strings then fret the D and G strings...my ring finger wants to drop down just a tad.

(Note that all the above is in the first position...it's certainly not as difficult farther down the neck.)

Am considering adding a second guitarist to my practice sessions. His only job will be to play F chords when necessary. 😄
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  #38  
Old 02-19-2022, 04:00 AM
EZYPIKINS EZYPIKINS is offline
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Three "whole" weeks? And you've learned you have trouble with muscle memory.

Happened to us all.

Takes time and commitment.
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  #39  
Old 02-20-2022, 06:18 PM
Cervelo Cervelo is offline
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What I have done to help with chord changes is first I started out with just two fingers for the chords. I worked my way up to 100 bpm with that.

With the three finger chords I make a chord, slap my leg and make the chord again. I do that over and over. Then I will make a G chord, slap my leg and then make a C chord and do that over and over. It is working for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0he...euPc0H&index=3
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  #40  
Old 02-22-2022, 08:58 PM
OzzieMikie OzzieMikie is offline
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I like this drill...I think I hadn't been completely relaxing my fret hand when doing chord drills. Doing it this way it's impossible to not relax the fret hand and go back to the chord...seems to be working better to grow the muscle memory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervelo View Post
What I have done to help with chord changes is first I started out with just two fingers for the chords. I worked my way up to 100 bpm with that.

With the three finger chords I make a chord, slap my leg and make the chord again. I do that over and over. Then I will make a G chord, slap my leg and then make a C chord and do that over and over. It is working for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0he...euPc0H&index=3
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  #41  
Old 02-23-2022, 04:21 PM
The Bard Rocks The Bard Rocks is offline
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I remember those days.
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  #42  
Old 02-23-2022, 07:44 PM
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Consider spreading out your lessons to have more practice time. Taking a quick peek at the strings over the soundhole, just before you strum. is ok. Try out other guitars at shops if you can...you may find a guitar that is easdier to play. Learn A minor...same "shape" as E major... Keep it up, great things are coming.
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