The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-26-2015, 07:00 AM
B. Howard B. Howard is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Magnolia DE
Posts: 672
Default Opening the box

Sometimes what looks like more work up front is really the easiest and best approach to a repair. Repairing a single broken brace through the soundhole makes sense, but what about 3 or 4? What about repairs that are very difficult to reach in the lower bout? At a certain point it really just makes more sense from a time involved perspective as well as a quality of repair one to just open it up. Of course this presents some new problems. Bindings to deal with, getting the back realigned, etc. But like anything else, with proper tools, jigging and a well planned repair process it actually goes rather well.

This link is to my latest blog entry where I detail the repairs of Guild D-30 that was stepped on and partially repaired by someone else. I show my methods for opening and reclosing a soundbox as well as the actual repairs to the bracing etc. Enjoy.

http://howardguitars.blogspot.com/20...r-repairs.html
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-26-2015, 08:06 AM
Tom West Tom West is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 1,070
Default

Brian: Nice repair. Looks like this one was rode hard and put away wet. Your jig for side alignment was interesting and certainly must ease the job of getting the back on in correct alignment. Have added your blog to my favorites and will venture in later and hopefully it will be as informative as this repair. Thanks.
Tom
__________________
A person who has never made a mistake has never made anything
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-26-2015, 01:56 PM
rogthefrog rogthefrog is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 5,065
Default

That was a fun read. Thanka for sharing.
__________________
Solo acoustic guitar videos:
This Boy is Damaged - Little Watercolor Pictures of Locomotives - Ragamuffin
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-26-2015, 03:12 PM
Sam VanLaningham Sam VanLaningham is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Bend, Oregon
Posts: 1,235
Default

Brian. Thanks so much! I plan on opening up my guild JF30 to rebrace (I messed it up shaving too much wood). Your methods are totally inspirational. I'm almost tempted to stet today!!!! Cool.

Sam
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-26-2015, 03:47 PM
printer2 printer2 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 3,766
Default

Going to have to call you 'have heat gun and spatula will travel'.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-27-2015, 05:50 AM
B. Howard B. Howard is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Magnolia DE
Posts: 672
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
Going to have to call you 'have heat gun and spatula will travel'.
Yes they can be two of my favorite tools at times. Plus the heat gun is good for keeping my coffee warm while i work.......
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-27-2015, 09:04 AM
redir redir is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Mountains of Virginia
Posts: 4,888
Default

That looks great Brian. You make it look easy. Fortunately for me I have long skinny monkey arms and can reach way back inside guitars. But sometimes it just makes sense to take off the back. When I've done this in the past I would make a mold to keep the back aligned and use wedges if necessary to form fit it as close as possible but that jig, Franks jig, is quite clever.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-27-2015, 09:38 AM
Halcyon/Tinker's Avatar
Halcyon/Tinker Halcyon/Tinker is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2,099
Default

That's awesome! I often think that repair is harder than building...
__________________
Halcyon Guitars
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-27-2015, 10:21 AM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,813
Default

Quote:
I often think that repair is harder than building...
I have done plenty of both, and repair can definitely be harder than building. The most challenging is to undo bad previous repairs.
I also believe that repair experience makes you a better builder.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-27-2015, 10:35 AM
Ned Milburn Ned Milburn is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Dartmouth, NS
Posts: 3,125
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
I also believe that repair experience makes you a better builder.
Agreed! One thing I appreciate a great deal is learning from other builders' design flaws, to ensure I don't do the same thing on mine!

"If it works, use it! If it doesn't, don't!" ;-)
__________________
----

Ned Milburn
NSDCC Master Artisan
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-27-2015, 04:57 PM
repete repete is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 216
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
The most challenging is to undo bad previous repairs.
That statement had held true in EVERY craft I have been involved in!

-r
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=