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Old 09-15-2020, 07:58 AM
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Mr. Jelly Mr. Jelly is offline
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Default Playing the Changes, I think

I do a flat pick style of playing and like to play the melody when taking flat pick breaks during a tune. I'm far from being a beginner and I am looking to minimize the number of notes I use while doing so at times. In my research of my playing I have noticed that I prefer to start on the third of a chord when I play over them, most of the time. My question: is there a thumb nail rule to implicate chord changes when playing single notes?
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Old 09-15-2020, 09:29 AM
JonPR JonPR is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr. Jelly View Post
I do a flat pick style of playing and like to play the melody when taking flat pick breaks during a tune. I'm far from being a beginner and I am looking to minimize the number of notes I use while doing so at times. In my research of my playing I have noticed that I prefer to start on the third of a chord when I play over them, most of the time. My question: is there a thumb nail rule to implicate chord changes when playing single notes?
3rds and 7ths is what jazz musicians do. They're the "guide tones" which indicate the quality of the chord (3rd) and its function (7th). Jazz pianists and guitarists will often play nothing but 3rds and 7ths when accompanying a soloist. Partly because the bass plays the roots (and maybe the 5ths) but mainly because 3rd and 7th are enough to imply the chords.
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Old 09-15-2020, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by JonPR View Post
3rds and 7ths is what jazz musicians do. They're the "guide tones" which indicate the quality of the chord (3rd) and its function (7th). Jazz pianists and guitarists will often play nothing but 3rds and 7ths when accompanying a soloist. Partly because the bass plays the roots (and maybe the 5ths) but mainly because 3rd and 7th are enough to imply the chords.
Thanks. That's exactly what I was looking for. You saved me allot of digging.
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Old 09-15-2020, 01:24 PM
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I think a better phrase would be "playing towards the changes".
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Old 09-15-2020, 01:27 PM
cliff_the_stiff cliff_the_stiff is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPR View Post
3rds and 7ths is what jazz musicians do. They're the "guide tones" which indicate the quality of the chord (3rd) and its function (7th). Jazz pianists and guitarists will often play nothing but 3rds and 7ths when accompanying a soloist. Partly because the bass plays the roots (and maybe the 5ths) but mainly because 3rd and 7th are enough to imply the chords.
I just learned something that I didnít know I needed to know!
Thanks again for asking/answering this!
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Old 09-16-2020, 01:43 AM
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Originally Posted by cliff_the_stiff View Post
I just learned something that I didnít know I needed to know!
Thanks again for asking/answering this!

+1

Thatís going to take a while to fully sink in...
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Old 09-16-2020, 04:41 AM
NormanKliman NormanKliman is offline
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Yeah, good post Jon. Mr. Jelly pretty much set it up for you, but itís nice to see so much information in such a short response. (Not saying your posts are too long.)

Can anyone post an audio/video example?
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Old 09-16-2020, 05:34 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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When playing the changes in jazz, you usually need to also wonder/worry about the 5 (could be flat) ditto the 9, but the 3 and the 7 define the chord, as stated. I quite like the idea of starting a line on either one. I am far too root-centric, I'll bet!
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