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Old 03-07-2018, 03:03 PM
JackB1 JackB1 is offline
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Default Replacing Taylor 114ce Saddle Questions

OK I bought a used 114ce and the saddle looks altered and the action is too low for me. Also the spacing between the strings looks off. Either way, I want to replace the saddle. What would you recommend? The same stack Taylor micarta saddle or bone or something else?

Also, can I do this myself? Do they come at the proper height (like a new guitar would) or would I need to sand it down some? Is this something I should leave to my luthier? I've never replaced a saddle before.
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:35 PM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
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Taylor uses pre-cast Tusq saddles with B-string compensation for the most part, and those are widely available as new parts. Some lowering will likely be needed. 114's are noted for being fairly bright, and bone would likely just reinforce that tendency. FWIW, I have never replaced the saddle or nut on anything purely for tone "improvements", only when they wear out or I went too far in slotting or sanding. But more power to those who do change for tone.

If you want to lower the action, determine the amount of lowering you need at the 12th fret and sand off twice that much saddle height. Example: reduce action at 12th fret by 1/32", sand off 2/32" = 1/16". Work slowly, or be prepared to do it repeatedly! Patience is your friend.....

For pickup performance and best acoustic tone, the bottom should remain as flat as possible. I sand against an old mirror, being very careful to keep the saddle blank perfectly vertical. It isn't rocket surgery, so give it a shot. I always leave the original part alone and start with a fresh blank -- makes it easy to restore the original condition. You might also want to try a shim first. Many techs use a piece or two of paper label stuck to the bottom of the existing saddle and trimmed with an X-acto knife.
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:59 PM
JackB1 JackB1 is offline
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Where is the best place to order a Taylor saddle?
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Old 03-07-2018, 05:03 PM
ChrisN ChrisN is offline
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Originally Posted by JackB1 View Post
Where is the best place to order a Taylor saddle?
https://www.taylorguitars.com/taylor...addle-acoustic

Stewmac has them, too, but their shipping $ is too high. I'd get it from Taylor.
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Old 03-07-2018, 05:42 PM
JackB1 JackB1 is offline
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Originally Posted by ChrisN View Post
https://www.taylorguitars.com/taylor...addle-acoustic

Stewmac has them, too, but their shipping $ is too high. I'd get it from Taylor.
Ok thanks for the tip
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:04 PM
ChalkLitIScream ChalkLitIScream is offline
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If you have picky ears like me and off tune notes throw you off, its best to do your own saddle work and intonate to your guitar specifically along with your given action.

Tusq blanks should be available at your big guitar stores- try the PQ-9000-00.
Or else bone works fine too, though it's a bit tougher to work with. Its fun if enjoy this kind of stuff. Order multiple blanks bc it's a learning experience!

Also, I don't think you can change your string spacing at the saddle, unless you are doing some advanced techniques to cut notches at measured points in your saddle.
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:43 PM
phavriluk phavriluk is offline
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While OP is ordering his replacement saddle from the mother ship, I suggest he ask about Taylor's recommended procedures to alter action height. Taylors don't get maintained like other guitars. I think, and 'think' is the word, that adjusting action height by resetting the neck with different shims than those installed is the Taylor method. Not shaving the saddle. Doesn't take much time or effort at all, at a Taylor authorized repair center who have access to the shim sets.
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Old 03-08-2018, 06:18 AM
JackB1 JackB1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChalkLitIScream View Post
If you have picky ears like me and off tune notes throw you off, its best to do your own saddle work and intonate to your guitar specifically along with your given action.

Tusq blanks should be available at your big guitar stores- try the PQ-9000-00.
Or else bone works fine too, though it's a bit tougher to work with. Its fun if enjoy this kind of stuff. Order multiple blanks bc it's a learning experience!

Also, I don't think you can change your string spacing at the saddle, unless you are doing some advanced techniques to cut notches at measured points in your saddle.
Yes the person I bough the guitar from cut notches in the saddle for some reason. I guess to lower action. I know this is not the way to do it and why I need to replace the saddle.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:43 AM
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The saddle will not affect the string spacing.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:50 AM
ChrisN ChrisN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackB1 View Post
Yes the person I bough the guitar from cut notches in the saddle for some reason. I guess to lower action. I know this is not the way to do it and why I need to replace the saddle.
While it's possible the PO notched the saddle to lower the action, I suspect it was done to increase Taylor's default 2 3/16 string spacing. That would mean the strings were pulled a little bit off of their straight lines from the pin to the nut.

Put a caliper/ruler on the middle of the E and measure to the middle of the e and see how many /16ths you have. If I'm wrong, it will measure 2 3/16 and you'll have to replace the saddle to raise the action. If I'm right, it will measure closer to 2 4/16 (more likely) or even 2 5/16 (less likely, given neck width). If so, to restore higher action, simply loosen the strings a turn, lift them out of the notches so they're sitting on top of the saddle, each in a straight line from the pin to the nut, then retune.

It's possible one or more strings (more likely the ones nearest the center) will be too close to their notches and drop back in with vigorous strumming, in which case you'd have to change the saddle, but giving this a try may buy you some time before doing that, or even eliminate the need to do so.
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:19 AM
JackB1 JackB1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fazool View Post
The saddle will not affect the string spacing.
Right, it shouldn't. However the person who had this guitar before me had someone file grooves into the saddle from the top, so now the strings fit into the grooves. Yikes!

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Old 03-08-2018, 08:22 AM
JackB1 JackB1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisN View Post
While it's possible the PO notched the saddle to lower the action, I suspect it was done to increase Taylor's default 2 3/16 string spacing. That would mean the strings were pulled a little bit off of their straight lines from the pin to the nut.

Put a caliper/ruler on the middle of the E and measure to the middle of the e and see how many /16ths you have. If I'm wrong, it will measure 2 3/16 and you'll have to replace the saddle to raise the action. If I'm right, it will measure closer to 2 4/16 (more likely) or even 2 5/16 (less likely, given neck width). If so, to restore higher action, simply loosen the strings a turn, lift them out of the notches so they're sitting on top of the saddle, each in a straight line from the pin to the nut, then retune.

It's possible one or more strings (more likely the ones nearest the center) will be too close to their notches and drop back in with vigorous strumming, in which case you'd have to change the saddle, but giving this a try may buy you some time before doing that, or even eliminate the need to do so.
saddle is beyond repair (check pic in previous post). needs to be replaced.
not sure what the original owner was thinking.
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:34 AM
ChrisN ChrisN is offline
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Originally Posted by JackB1 View Post
saddle is beyond repair (check pic in previous post). needs to be replaced.
not sure what the original owner was thinking.
Ha! Looks like he wanted/needed the extra spacing just between G and B, then notched the rest to maintain consistent action (string height). Probably got tired of hooking his index fingertip/nail on the B string. Agree that it's better to start fresh on this one. I do wish Taylor offered 2 1/4 spacing!
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:37 AM
JackB1 JackB1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisN View Post
Ha! Looks like he wanted/needed the extra spacing just between G and B, then notched the rest to maintain consistent action (string height). Probably got tired of hooking his index fingertip/nail on the B string. Agree that it's better to start fresh on this one. I do wish Taylor offered 2 1/4 spacing!
He said he had his "uncle lower the action" for him.

Oh well...easy enough fix (I hope)
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Old 03-08-2018, 10:33 AM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phavriluk View Post
.......Taylors don't get maintained like other guitars. I think, and 'think' is the word, that adjusting action height by resetting the neck with different shims than those installed is the Taylor method. Not shaving the saddle. Doesn't take much time or effort at all, at a Taylor authorized repair center who have access to the shim sets.
This bears repeating. Taylor with NT necks should have the neck angle changed first for best action, which is no big deal for an authorized tech who has the shims. Taylor will recommend that as a first step, then replacing the saddle and possibly making tiny adjustments to its height as the final tweak.

However, that saddle needs to be replaced. Anything else will be chasing your tail, action-wise. You can try a new Tusq saddle first, and f that fixes the problem, then you are done. If not, time to take it to a tech for further "action".
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