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  #1  
Old 02-19-2019, 02:12 PM
wguitar wguitar is offline
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Default Best Musicians EarPlugs

Hi,

I am a baby boomer with tinnitus and some hearing loss who plays guitar (mostly acoustic / amplified during occasional small venue gigs) and enjoy concerts, live music at both indoor and outdoor venues. Guessing many can relate. Anyway, would appreciate your thoughts on musicians ear plugs and any experience you're had with them. Since last summer I've been using the V-Moda Faders and they're not bad (but muffle the music a bit more than I'd prefer). Any suggestions or information would be appreciated.

THANKS!
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Old 02-19-2019, 02:46 PM
Silly Moustache Silly Moustache is offline
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Hi, I use Howard Leight "Quiet" orange corded earplugs.

I first discovered them in 1999, in a music shop aimed at electric guitarists.

I never go to the Gym, theatre, or concerts without them. I also used to sleep with them.

They are soft, pliable and washable and they last a long time.

Sadly their website doesn't work, but yu can find them on Ebay or Amazon.
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Old 02-19-2019, 06:27 PM
[J.K.] [J.K.] is offline
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I remember trying the Hearos musician earplugs and some Eargasm (ugh) ones my friend talked me into. Honestly, I didn't think there was anything particularly great about them compared to standard earplugs. They weren't too bass-centric, which was alright, but they imparted a weird imbalance to the high-mids I felt. I always meant to try the Earasers plugs, but I got sick of paying a premium for varying degrees of mediocrity.
I also have a sneaking suspicion that my ear canals must be a half size off from everything, seeing as I've always found anything in-ear to be inconsistent from moment to moment. I would love for there to be a set of earplugs that works just like a master volume control, but I don't think there's a magical combination of rubber and foam that's going to achieve that.

When I played electric guitar in my last band, there was a lot of volume competition between the other guitarist and me. To the frustration of the sound guy, we'd eventually edge everything up to the point where I could physically feel my Hiwatt DR103 transform my cabinet into a cannon behind me. Anyway, I just kept a pack of those cheap, squishy flesh-colored Mack's foam earplugs around and found them to be more or less perfect; once you adjust to the way in which it's dampening frequencies, it works much better and more reliably than most alternatives, and at really loud shows, it's still easy to hear and pick out the entire frequency spectrum from the monitors.
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Old 02-19-2019, 06:56 PM
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packmule packmule is offline
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I play drums (in punk bands) and have used the Earasers for a couple of years now and like them - I have traditionally hated ear plugs because they make everything sound so muted but I like the Earasers a lot.
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Old 02-19-2019, 08:30 PM
The Growler The Growler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by packmule View Post
I play drums (in punk bands) and have used the Earasers for a couple of years now and like them - I have traditionally hated ear plugs because they make everything sound so muted but I like the Earasers a lot.
I'll second this recommendation. Very comfortable and designed to be worn and still provide full frequencies to musicians.
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Old 02-20-2019, 08:39 AM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [J.K.] View Post
...To the frustration of the sound guy, we'd eventually edge everything up to the point where I could physically feel my Hiwatt DR103 transform my cabinet into a cannon behind me...
Quote:
Originally Posted by packmule View Post
I play drums (in punk bands) and have used the Earasers for a couple of years now...
Maybe it's just me (and not to minimize anyone's existing hearing problems in any way/shape/form - my father was partially deaf so I "get it"), but given the quantum leap in PA system technology over the last half-century - along with the discovery by many knowledgeable guitarists that a smaller amp can provide "that" sound at reasonable levels - I fail to see the reason to push volume levels beyond the threshold of permanent damage, regardless of musical genre...
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:25 AM
[J.K.] [J.K.] is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve DeRosa View Post
...given the quantum leap in PA system technology over the last half-century - along with the discovery by many knowledgeable guitarists that a smaller amp can provide "that" sound at reasonable levels - I fail to see the reason to push volume levels beyond the threshold of permanent damage, regardless of musical genre...
“The only way to feel the noise is when it’s good and loud.”
I mean, crank a Hiwatt and tell me you can find *that sound* with any smaller amp. The headroom, articulation, and depth is a sonic experience, and it doesn’t lose muscle like a Fender Twin. That said, sometimes we’d play shows where the only PA was a mic PA, which isn’t uncommon for a band touring small DIY venues. Plus our drummer came from a metal background, and when you’re playing fast stuff with big dynamics (especially in a practice room without a PA), you have to at least be able to match the drums with gear that holds tight across the spectrum.
Besides... playing loud on a stage feels godly. Even a show with poor attendance can feel better than sex if you’re committed to playing full tilt. Life is short.
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Old 03-08-2019, 06:24 PM
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El Conquistador El Conquistador is offline
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Has anyone tried Eargasam earplugs? https://eargasmearplugs.com/

If so, what do you think?

Steve
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Old 03-09-2019, 11:00 AM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
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I'm not a fan of any so-called "musician earplugs". By definition, they let some sound through and yet still color the tone. The point of an earplug is the NRR (Noise Reduction Rating) or how many decibels of noise reduction is achieved. Notice that you usually don't see NRR values published on the packaging, because they would not look good, and are often not even tested.

I use my regular industrial grade EAR brand silicone ear plugs and just adapt to what I'm hearing. At 59 my hearing is still pretty good, and I want to keep it that way. I still work in acoustics, and no want wants to hire a deaf acoustical engineer to work on their room.
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