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Old 02-02-2019, 07:29 AM
Mich Novice Mich Novice is offline
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Default Educate me, Gibson friends

Looking for some insight on differences between Les Paul studios and standards. I want an LP but debating which way to go with it. Are we mostly talking about wood quality and aesthetics, or is there a quality difference with electronics, etc? Any experiences that canít be found on a spec list would be much appreciated! I will likely buy used, perhaps unless I decide there is a forever piece out there.
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Old 02-02-2019, 10:07 AM
muscmp muscmp is offline
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i believe bob womack has done a review or at least knows the differences. you may want to search this forum.

play music!
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Old 02-02-2019, 02:44 PM
The Growler The Growler is offline
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There are different pickup configurations available on both. You can find studio models that will match any other model configuration as far as electronics go.

Studios were meant to be a plainer looking, cheaper to make and buy for the studio, where the more blingy models with higher grade tops, binding, fancier inlays, etc. were meant for the stage where you had an audience to appreciate the bling.

So, if you want the sound and save some money, a studio will foot the bill. If you want the bling, you'll want to move up the line.

Hope this helps.
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Old 02-02-2019, 03:19 PM
Mich Novice Mich Novice is offline
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Studio may be smarter so Iím not afraid to play the thing!

Iím not sure I should have my wallet with me if I ever encounter that blood orange burst standard model. Wow.
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Old 02-02-2019, 04:28 PM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mich Novice View Post
...I will likely buy used, perhaps unless I decide there is a forever piece out there.
I've been checking out Les Pauls since the early-60s, when a P-90 goldtop could routinely be had for $100 on Manhattan's 14th Street "Pawnshop Row"...

I passed up '58s and '59s when they sold for $750 in excellent-plus to near-mint condition - there was always an issue with weight and/or neck profile (especially the '58s), and I could never locate a final-batch '60 with the SG-style Slim Taper neck and chrome-dome knobs...

I was in the Edison (NJ) Sam Ash store in 2011 when I spotted a P-90 goldtop Tribute on the wall - reminded me of the sweet under-the-bed '56/'57 models I used to see back when; weight was comparable to some of the heavier SG's I've played/owned, neck felt just right - bought it on the spot for $800, been offered as much as $1300 during the interim (all offers declined, needless to say)...

A/B'd it a few years ago against a well-maintained (and rare) '58 PAF/darkback I was setting up for a since-passed WW II vet who bought it new back in the day (yes, boys and girls, they're still out there - you just have to be a little more creative and look a little harder for them) - worth a conservative $60-70K IMO (forget it - his grandkids are keeping it in the family)...

They both sounded exactly like you would expect a Les Paul to sound - albeit different flavors of the same formula - and truth be told, I liked mine better...

PSA: A "forever piece" doesn't need to cost an arm, a leg, and a couple other highly-useful appendages (FWIW I get it - I've wanted a double-cut Gretsch White Falcon since I saw my first one in the '63 catalog as a kid, finally got one last year); IME you're giving up little if anything that really counts (tone, construction, playability) in the lower-priced models - and if the new management team can up the ante on consistency and QC the sub-$3K LP's are going to be an even better deal...
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Old 02-02-2019, 05:22 PM
The Growler The Growler is offline
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Don't ever rule out a used guitar from being a "forever" guitar. You just might miss out.
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Old 02-02-2019, 07:11 PM
Mich Novice Mich Novice is offline
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Oh Iím not saying a used one couldnít be special! Was just giving a scenario in which Iíd buy new. I prefer used stuff. I donít feel like itís depreciating in my hands.
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:00 PM
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Here are the basics of the current ones:
Standard: AAA flame maple body cap with deep dish carve, two-piece mahogany body back, ultra-modern weight relief, one-piece mahogany neck with assymetrical slim/medium neck carve, compound radius fingerboard, bound body, bound neck with binding "nibs" over fret ends, gloss nitrocellulose lacquer, locking tuners, Burstbucker Pro pickups, four push-pull knobs offer pickup splits, blower switch, and out of phase pickups plus internal multi-way switch, chrome hardware, hard case.

Studio differences: lower grade woods, thinner maple cap with flatter carve, no binding on body, bound slim taper neck, 12" radius fingerboard, push-pulls on volume knobs for coil taps, 490R and 498T pickups, Grover rotomatic tuners.

There are also Studio Tribute versions with matte finishes and soft cases.

My review of the 2018 Standard is HERE.



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Old 02-02-2019, 08:57 PM
Mich Novice Mich Novice is offline
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Great stuff, Bob! Much appreciated!

I will perhaps have to try both. I see Sweetwater has some exclusive colors with BurstBuckers in the Studio line.
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Old 02-02-2019, 10:15 PM
Jerry D Jerry D is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Growler View Post
So, if you want the sound and save some money, a studio will foot the bill.
I think you meant fit the bill.
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Old 02-03-2019, 07:33 AM
Dru Edwards Dru Edwards is offline
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I have a Gibson Les Paul Studio and Standards. A Studio is by no means a lesser quality, lesser built guitar. They're both made in the same factory. Gibson saves money on some of the aesthetics. Whether you like the pickups in either guitar is a personal taste but with all the flavors out there you should be able to find something you like.
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Old 02-03-2019, 10:39 AM
hbg hbg is offline
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If you look at used guitars, you can find Studio models with the same pickup configurations as most of the Standard models. Pickups are also easy to swap out. Different years also have different necks and fretboard widths and such.

From what I've seen, the biggest consistent differences between LP Studio and LP Standard seem to be the binding, the degree of figuring in the maple top, sometimes the finish and the profile of the carve of the maple top.

I gave a 2015 Les Paul Studio as a gift to my sister last year, and it has beautiful finish and figuring. It also came stock with the '57 Classic pickups, and coil splitting. I've been admiring it so much that I had a search in my feed on Reverb for the same model and just picked one up last week. It's really a super guitar, but has some features that people don't like - robot tuners which a prior owner replaced so not an issue, a wider nut than some years, which I like, and a brass adjustable nut which doesn't bother me but some people dislike. Each guitar was well under $1,000, and I've seen other years of Standard models with the same pickups but not coil split priced from the high-1,000s to mid-2,000s so it feels like a good deal. Both guitars have great tone and are comfortable to play.

Sorry to hijack talking about my new guitar, I guess point is that if you look at different years and models there are so many variations at different price points you can easily find a cool guitar to suit your needs and budget. My search resulted in my opinion that the Studios are not significant lesser quality for a hobby player as much as just not quite as decked out aesthetically (and honestly, I don't like the light-colored binding around the body of an electric guitar, and the unbound neck plays just fine for me).
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Last edited by hbg; 02-03-2019 at 10:53 AM.
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hbg View Post
It's really a super guitar, but has some features that people don't like - robot tuners which a prior owner replaced so not an issue, a wider nut than some years, which I like, and a brass adjustable nut which doesn't bother me but some people dislike. Each guitar was well under $1,000, and I've seen other years of Standard models with the same pickups but not coil split priced from the high-1,000s to mid-2,000s so it feels like a good deal. Both guitars have great tone and are comfortable to play.

Sorry to hijack talking about my new guitar, I guess point is that if you look at different years and models there are so many variations at different price points you can easily find a cool guitar to suit your needs and budget. My search resulted in my opinion that the Studios are not significant lesser quality for a hobby player as much as just not quite as decked out aesthetically (and honestly, I don't like the light-colored binding around the body of an electric guitar, and the unbound neck plays just fine for me).
We really must see this guitar!

By the way, I traded a 2993 LP Studio a year ago that had the biggest neck I had ever seen and very low frets.

Bob
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:30 PM
guitararmy guitararmy is offline
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I found Gibson's previous Les Paul offerings to be confusing to me due to sheer number of variations. It looks like the new management may have cleaned it up a bit.
Still miss a LP Classic I had, as well as a first gen Jimmy Page model.
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:49 PM
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My late brother loved these guitars, especially the Standard. The full thickness and weight is beyond my ability, but did notice same finish and binding as the Standard HCSB applied to a ďLiteĒ model, with thinner body looked more manageable. I donít think the Lite is still in production.
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