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  #31  
Old 06-12-2011, 10:09 PM
Landru Landru is offline
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I love the V - big beast, though it is - it's making me a tough dude.
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  #32  
Old 07-14-2011, 06:18 AM
fulfillingsoul fulfillingsoul is offline
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Collings has the V-neck (non-vintage) as their standard.
This has to be the most well-liked neck profile, right?
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  #33  
Old 07-14-2011, 08:03 AM
TomHB TomHB is offline
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I learned on an old Korean Martin D copy with a mod V, and have a T-170 with a deeper mod V. What I like is that it fills my palm and rotates my hand around the neck a bit with my thumb anchored on the flat upper side of the V, which makes vibrato very easy (not classical, "butterfly").

Also easier to access wider fretboards with the wrist rotation a V allows (as-opposed to a fat classical neck), and IMO it's great for barre chords as well. I cramp up on skinny necks, and a mod V just feels comfy to me. V's make thumb-around chords easy too. The U neck on my '52 Tele is a close second.

I've tried one of the Washburn 125th anniversary Parlours, and it felt great to play with it's very sharp V, except that I did find barre chords a bit painful on for extended periods with my thumb planted right in the ridge.
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  #34  
Old 07-14-2011, 10:01 AM
zabdart zabdart is offline
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If I want the feel of a V-neck, I'll play banjo.
Don't like V-necks on guitars -- I have small hands and fingers.
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  #35  
Old 07-14-2011, 11:41 AM
JTFoote JTFoote is offline
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The soft V-neck profile on my Collings is the most comfortable I have known, and the biggest reason I was so quickly sold on the guitar.

I spent years playing a Guild mini-jumbo, and the neck on that guitar nearly ruined me, although I didn't realize the problem at the time ... I just knew that it took very little for me to be in lots of pain. I had never heard of carpal tunnel back then, and had no idea what was wrong ... but it finally got so bad, I had to quit playing. I lost a decade because of it.

Fast forward ... the wiser player goes looking for a new guitar, and once I had my hands on that Collings neck, I knew that my worries were over. Almost three years later, not a twinge, no swelling or numbness, no strain, just hours of playing ease.

A vintage V-neck would pretty much finish me off, and I can barely handle a C-shaped neck, if I stretch thoroughly beforehand. Those guitars with the vintage V might sound great because of the extra mass, but be advised, if one doesn't feel comfortable to you, right off the bat, sometimes, forcing yourself to play despite the pain can be a permanent problem ... and even cause permanent damage. To me, playing is not about strength nearly as much as flexibility and agility. If a neck profile interferes with that, you've inherited a battle not worth attempting to win.

... JT
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  #36  
Old 07-14-2011, 11:47 AM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newbie888 View Post
what does a v-neck offer?
A fatter neck, as others have noted. I can put up with a V-neck, as several of my guitars have them. However, with my medium size hands, if I had a choice, I would rather have a Taylor-type neck profile. But since I have been enticed by the great tone from the guitars I have purchased, I have done my best to adapt to whatever necks come on them.

- Glenn
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  #37  
Old 07-15-2011, 02:59 PM
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devellis devellis is offline
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I think how you form chords and how the neck is shaped are closely related. I have guitars with different neck profiles and I'll often find that tunes I play on one will be tougher on another because of how I'm most accustomed to using my hand for a particular tune. For thumb-wrapping, a beefier neck works better for me. The neck fills my hand and I can just squeeze to get adequate thumb pressure. Barres, on the other hand, work better on lower profile necks where I can get my thumb flatter against the back of the neck.

I'm sure better players can adapt more skillfully than I can but for me at least, the neck influences how I approach playing a guitar; or stated differently, the tune and how i prefer playing it will influence the guitar I choose to play it on.
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  #38  
Old 07-15-2011, 03:09 PM
MarkC MarkC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newbie888 View Post
what does a v-neck offer?
I have smallish hands. When I first started playing guitar I assumed that a low profile neck would be more comfortable, but they cause my fingers to start cramping up after about 2 passes through a chord progression. The V-shaped necks turn out to be way more comfortable for me, so that's all I play now. Go figure.

Mark
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  #39  
Old 07-15-2011, 03:23 PM
310Taylor 310Taylor is offline
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Im lookin to get a vintage series martin soon. What I worry about is switching between my taylor to the v neck and back. I find the v comfortable but who knows after a while. What worries me is switching though. I could see how that could cause problems. Hopefully, my hand can adjust to both necks.
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  #40  
Old 07-15-2011, 03:59 PM
freaktone freaktone is offline
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I actually don't mind playing a bunch of different kinds of necks. If I like the way a guitar sounds, I'll learn to play it. I have long thin fingers and can handle baseball bats, though, if needed.

That said, I love V necks. I have two: a Modified V on a Martin om41 and a replica of a 1927 Gibson L-7's neck on a Flammang L-45. These are actually remarkably similar necks. Love them both.

I had a Blueridge 140a though with a TINY neck and, whatever, it was fine.
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  #41  
Old 07-16-2011, 08:41 AM
john57classic john57classic is offline
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I have no doubt that I will ultimately part with my beloved 00018ge sb because of the neck. I played a d18 ge for over a decade and never really worried about the neck but now I find that I can't play the 00018 for more than about 20 minutes before the main thumb joint in my left hand begins to ache. Not sure why (age?). Right now it's not an issue because I have multiple guitars and room for them but if/when I decide to thin the herd, which might be sooner rather than later as the kids are out and my wife want to downsize the house, I'm sure I wil have to let this one go because of the neck profile.
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  #42  
Old 07-16-2011, 09:24 AM
go7 go7 is offline
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I have a 000-18GE w/ quite a full V neck.I have small hands.
My early training was classical. I find the V a nice place to rest my thumb.
A heavier touch on the fretting hand could cause fatigue.
I have a very light touch on the fretting hand and like the V neck.
I play mostly barre chords, no problem.
My favourite neck is the Martin PA series pretty much opposite shaping.
go figure??
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  #43  
Old 07-16-2011, 10:12 AM
Peoriapicker Peoriapicker is offline
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Great thread. I have been wondering the same thing. I recently switched to a V neck guitar and I love it. It feels the most comfortable for me when playing in the open position. It also helps me to grab the E string with my thumb. Before this guitar I never really played any v-necks. I think a lot of how much you like or dislike v necks has to do with how you hold the neck. I suspect that your hand gets muscle memory from playing much like a golfer gets from playing. When you switch you use the muscles in your hand differently and that causes muscle soreness.
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  #44  
Old 07-16-2011, 06:57 PM
000-18GE 000-18GE is offline
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I completely understand why some people dislike various neck shapes, including V-necks but for whatever reason my hands seem to adapt all neck shapes I try. If I pay attention, I can tell I'm modifying my technique to accomodate each neck but I've never thought of it as problematic. In general, I suppose I prefer the feel of a fuller neck to fill up my hand despite having small hands.
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