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  #16  
Old 02-19-2019, 11:18 AM
6L6 6L6 is offline
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My ears prefer the sound of the standard Collings d2h and d2ha. I own one of each, both equipped with the 1 11/16” nut I prefer.

Phenomenal guitars!

Last edited by Kerbie; 03-19-2019 at 07:51 AM. Reason: Reference deleted
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  #17  
Old 02-19-2019, 01:16 PM
zoopeda zoopeda is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kh1967 View Post
I asked Collings about the tonal differences between the standard series and the Traditionals - here is the reply:

Our standard series has a very clear and detailed tone, with lots of overtone activity and crisp/punchy bass response.
We liken the sound of our standard series to the sound of a piano in some ways.
Our Traditional series by comparison is warm and full bodied, with a smoother and more subdued bass response. The harmonic complexion is fairly dry compared to our standard series.
The Traditional guitars are designed to sound more akin to a pre-war Martin.
Does anyone know about the construction differences? Specifically bracing? Ie, do these use a tucked bridgeplate and aggressive scalloping like the Martin Authentic series?

I see they use fish glue, which is not hot hide glue. Thinner finish is smart. No dovetail or Tbar neck rod. Iíd love to play one, but my skepticism is getting the better of me here.

Can anyone report on how these sound compare to comparable Martin Authentics? I ask because Collings is making the claim that these guys resemble the tone of pre war Martins. Thatís a huge claim. Iím curious how the D1T sounds next to the D-18A 1937 or the D2T next to the D-28A 1937.
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  #18  
Old 02-19-2019, 01:51 PM
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brencat brencat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoopeda View Post
Does anyone know about the construction differences? Specifically bracing? Ie, do these use a tucked bridgeplate and aggressive scalloping like the Martin Authentic series?

I see they use fish glue, which is not hot hide glue. Thinner finish is smart. No dovetail or Tbar neck rod. Iíd love to play one, but my skepticism is getting the better of me here.

Can anyone report on how these sound compare to comparable Martin Authentics? I ask because Collings is making the claim that these guys resemble the tone of pre war Martins. Thatís a huge claim. Iím curious how the D1T sounds next to the D-18A 1937 or the D2T next to the D-28A 1937.
The T series Collings are a *slight* variation on the typical Collings tone, but they still donít sound anything like a Martin. Pre*War Guitar Co probably comes the closest for the least amount of $$.
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  #19  
Old 02-19-2019, 01:58 PM
zoopeda zoopeda is offline
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Of the Martin Authentics I’ve played, they do at least resemble the Pre-War Martin tone. They don’t sound like really old guitars (the way PreWar Co seems to), but the D-18 1937 Authentic, for example, sounds convincingly like what I imagine those pre-war Martin guitars would have sounded like, brand new in the 30s. I think Collings makes a beautiful guitar, but I don’t hear much Martin in their tone. That’s why I find it so surprising they are apparently marketing this traditional series as sounding like a Pre-War Martin. I’m sure these sound different from the standard line, but no way they sound like a Pre-War Martin, or even an authentic series Martin for that matter. Someone prove me wrong!
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  #20  
Old 02-19-2019, 03:59 PM
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Haasome Haasome is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoopeda View Post
Does anyone know about the construction differences? Specifically bracing? Ie, do these use a tucked bridgeplate and aggressive scalloping like the Martin Authentic series?

I see they use fish glue, which is not hot hide glue. Thinner finish is smart. No dovetail or Tbar neck rod. I’d love to play one, but my skepticism is getting the better of me here.

Can anyone report on how these sound compare to comparable Martin Authentics? I ask because Collings is making the claim that these guys resemble the tone of pre war Martins. That’s a huge claim. I’m curious how the D1T sounds next to the D-18A 1937 or the D2T next to the D-28A 1937.
I like Collings guitars a lot. The T versions are drier and warmed up a bit, but I prefer the sound of the original/standard models. As Brencat says, the T versions are only slightly different from the originals to my ear. However, they don’t sound like a Martin - thankfully! I say this not as a knock to Martin. I just think it’s nice that we already have a builder that builds guitars that sound & play like a Martin; and that’s Martin. I appreciate having a variety to choose from. If I want something that sounds & plays like a Martin, I can buy a Martin. If I want something that sounds & plays like a Collings, I can buy one of those. But they are clearly different.
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  #21  
Old 02-19-2019, 06:46 PM
zoopeda zoopeda is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kh1967 View Post
I asked Collings about the tonal differences between the standard series and the Traditionals - here is the reply:

Our standard series has a very clear and detailed tone, with lots of overtone activity and crisp/punchy bass response.
We liken the sound of our standard series to the sound of a piano in some ways.
Our Traditional series by comparison is warm and full bodied, with a smoother and more subdued bass response. The harmonic complexion is fairly dry compared to our standard series.
The Traditional guitars are designed to sound more akin to a pre-war Martin.
Haasome, I very much agree. I've owned Martins, and I've owned Collings. Personally, I always prefer the Martins, but I am ever grateful for Bill Collings and the diversity of tone he brings through his high(est) class of instruments. I think variety and diversity are what make the world go round, and I also think makers like Collings keep Martin on their toes in a healthy competition.

But the thing that really drew my eye was the above quote that Collings thinks they're going after vintage Martin tone with this new series. Kind of a let down to hear that. Even as a Martin fan, I deeply respect the tone Collings has brought to guitarists everywhere. When people just start trying to copy Martin, I think (unless you're the boys at Pre-War Co!) everyone just ends up preferring the Martin.

Nonetheless, sounds like, regardless of silly marketing mumbo, these guitars offer something to the Collings universe of sound, and I think that's great.
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  #22  
Old 02-19-2019, 08:56 PM
Taylor007 Taylor007 is offline
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I have feeling that Collings will continue to expand the T line.
The JL OM is amazing. If Collings does to dreds what they did w/ the JL OM, weíre going to see some amazing guitars. (Yes they are already amazing). I know they did a one off custom for Julianís duo parter Chris Eldridge seen & heard in the clip below:
https://youtu.be/U7dpseBvzc4
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  #23  
Old 02-21-2019, 12:24 AM
jrb715 jrb715 is offline
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From my experience, Martin Authentics don't really sound like pre-war Martins. There's a lot of guessing going on: one can say "this is what those Martins would have sounded like when they were new"; but I don't know how you can make that leap. It's not what I hear. And Collings Ts don't really sound much like the pre-war Martins I've played. And the real outlier from Martin, the Outlaw, is my favorite Martin dread I've heard played on the web. I think it's fair on both Martin's and Collings' parts to claim they lean more to the sound of the pre-war Martins, but they surely don't get there. It's mostly marketing. (Which a whole lot of folks protest Taylor doing with V class guitars.)

But this is hardly a bad thing. The good pre-war Martins--and I've come to believe there's not all that many of them--have clearly developed their sound as the guitars have aged. They not only sound different, but, to me, they feel different: as if the wood has a different personality than the wood on good new guitars.

Martin Authentics and both standard and Traditional Collings guitars are pretty great sounding guitars. (And I lean, like Haasome, to prefer the Collings standard to the traditional: at least that's how I've voted with my wallet with both dreads and OMs.) While I won't be around in fifty years, those that will be will probably be ecstatic about the sound of pre 2020 Martin and Collings guitars--as well as, particularly, all the guitars of the small shop builders.
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  #24  
Old 02-21-2019, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haasome View Post
I like Collings guitars a lot. The T versions are drier and warmed up a bit, but I prefer the sound of the original/standard models. As Brencat says, the T versions are only slightly different from the originals to my ear.
My impressions are similar. A few days ago I took delivery of a new OM1T, thinking that it would replace my standard OM1A as a better fingerstyle guitar (based on the wider spacing and lightly braced sitka top). While the OM1T is no doubt a great and very responsive guitar, I didn't perceive it as an upgrade to the OM1A after comparing the two extensively. In fact, I slightly preferred the tone and balance of the OM1A, which is becoming more and more responsive as it nears its 2nd birthday.

End of story, I'm keeping the OM1A and returning the OM1T. Definitely try both if you can and trust your hands & ears.
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  #25  
Old 02-22-2019, 04:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shotzy View Post
My impressions are similar. A few days ago I took delivery of a new OM1T, thinking that it would replace my standard OM1A as a better fingerstyle guitar (based on the wider spacing and lightly braced sitka top). While the OM1T is no doubt a great and very responsive guitar, I didn't perceive it as an upgrade to the OM1A after comparing the two extensively. In fact, I slightly preferred the tone and balance of the OM1A, which is becoming more and more responsive as it nears its 2nd birthday.

End of story, I'm keeping the OM1A and returning the OM1T. Definitely try both if you can and trust your hands & ears.
This is a very good point. Age seems to influence them significantly. Iíve owned 2 Collings for 5+ years and they have mellowed beautifully. In fairness, Iíve never played a T version that wasnít new, but I agree with your experience. In any regard, they are all nice for my taste.
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