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  #1  
Old 08-23-2018, 11:36 AM
Digipenguin Digipenguin is offline
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Question How to Repair Chipped Ebony Binding?

Anyone have experience with this?



I have black CA ebony dust. Will that work?

How does one go about shoring it up to keep the repair medium in place?

Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 08-23-2018, 04:19 PM
cobalt60 cobalt60 is offline
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I'd first carve a chip that fills the void almost perfectly, and leave it over-sized to the outside dimensions. Glue it in and shave it flush, and you may need some dust to fill any voids.
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Old 08-23-2018, 05:29 PM
HarryQ HarryQ is offline
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I'd fill it with a mixture of ebony dust and super glue a little at a time, then carefully smooth it with a small file. You should have experience doing it before you try it though!
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Old 08-23-2018, 05:45 PM
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Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
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I would generally tape the area off and then build up the chip area with a mixture of LMI's fingerboard powdered dye and CA. You would want to practice with it first by putting a drop of CA on wax paper and then taking a toothpick tip of the dye, mix quick and apply. It's a small window of opportunity before it sets up but. it's strong, black and stays black when you sand it.
Then I would sand that sharp edge off of that binding all the way around so the guitar will be more comfortable to play and you won't have to keep fixing chips!

Good Luck,
Mark
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Old 08-23-2018, 07:05 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt60 View Post
I'd first carve a chip that fills the void almost perfectly, and leave it over-sized to the outside dimensions. Glue it in and shave it flush, and you may need some dust to fill any voids.
This.

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Old 08-23-2018, 07:22 PM
guitarguitar guitarguitar is offline
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It kind of depends on the finish product that will be applied over the repaired spot. If you decide on lacquer, then having a ca based fill can be a problem as the lacquer will pull away from the ca. Kind of like oil/water. If you seal that spot first with shellac not an issue. You should try to splice in as much solid ebony as possible. Skip
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Old 08-23-2018, 07:47 PM
phavriluk phavriluk is offline
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My first reaction is that is a simple enough repair for a skilled luthier and a nightmare in the raw for someone who's never dealt with ebony or bindings or local repairs. My own reaction to being confronted with this problem is to take the instrument to a professional and turn the problem over to him. It will get done right and virtually invisible when done right. I would not want my guitar to risk a very ugly result while climbing a learning curve. Rush hour on the freeway ain't the time to learn to drive. One person's opinion.

Last edited by phavriluk; 08-23-2018 at 07:48 PM. Reason: notification
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Old 08-23-2018, 10:21 PM
redir redir is offline
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I would also make a chip replacement. I'd probably even saw and chisel or Dremel out out a nice square section to make it easier, drop a block chip in there with black CA and sand it flush so the dust fills in the rest.

Lots of ways to skin that cat. Ebony is very forgiving.
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Old 08-23-2018, 10:48 PM
Shuksan Shuksan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phavriluk View Post
My first reaction is that is a simple enough repair for a skilled luthier and a nightmare in the raw for someone who's never dealt with ebony or bindings or local repairs. My own reaction to being confronted with this problem is to take the instrument to a professional and turn the problem over to him. It will get done right and virtually invisible when done right. I would not want my guitar to risk a very ugly result while climbing a learning curve. Rush hour on the freeway ain't the time to learn to drive. One person's opinion.
Digipenguin doesn't mention it in the OP, but he(she) is building the guitar in question so a repair should be doable.

Count me in with those who recommend filling the chip out with a solid piece of ebony and then sanding it to shape to match the surrounding undamaged binding.
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Old 08-24-2018, 11:19 AM
Digipenguin Digipenguin is offline
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Cool. I hadn't considered that. My brain was going down the path of some sort of filler made from ebony dust and CA but I can see how gluing in a piece of ebony would have it's advantages. Thanks for the input.
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Old 08-24-2018, 11:30 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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I don't see much rounding of the binding edges.

I don't know what caused the damage, but one of the reasons to round sharp corners/edges is to make them less susceptible to damage. It also feels much nicer and adds refinement to the work.

If the edges were rounded, the chip would all but disappear, or require only the smallest of build-up.

You appear to be at early stages of applying the finish. Were it me, I'd round all the edges, repair what little needs to be, then continue on with the finishing.
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  #12  
Old 08-24-2018, 06:23 PM
ruby50 ruby50 is offline
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Easy repair - with a sharp sharp block plane, make a flat spot that covers the problem area, then glue on a scrap of the binding. If there is a small depression left in the middle of the spot I don't think it would matter.

When it is dry, plane, scrape, and sand off the excess. You couldn't do this with most woods without a lot of thought and grain matching, but ebony is dead simple.

Ed
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Old 08-25-2018, 05:28 PM
Digipenguin Digipenguin is offline
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I went with the graft idea, I think it turned out pretty good.









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  #14  
Old 08-25-2018, 05:48 PM
cobalt60 cobalt60 is offline
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Good job and looks like a good learning experience, for future builds and maybe repairs as well.

One of my favorite builders once said that he was a good builder but a GREAT repairman, which I think about a lot
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  #15  
Old 08-25-2018, 07:06 PM
Digipenguin Digipenguin is offline
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Yep. I've done similar repairs on electric bodies but this was a bit different. Much finer.

Thanks for the suggestion. I basically did what you originally suggested but I didnt want to mess with making a piece to fit the irregular chipout so I filed the hole to a right angle to minimize the void left to be filled.

Thanks for the help.
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