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  #31  
Old 09-15-2019, 01:48 PM
jim1960 jim1960 is offline
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Originally Posted by Glennwillow View Post
Hi Jim,

I have always thought that Richard Shindell's "Wisteria" was such a touching song. I appreciate being reminded of it once more. That violin solo in the middle always gets to me...

- Glenn
Shindell is one of my favorite songwriters and this song is certainly one of his best. I've heard him play the song live a few times and it certainly holds its own without the production but the cd version makes a great song even greater.
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  #32  
Old 09-17-2019, 06:23 PM
slooky slooky is offline
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Originally Posted by Silly Moustache View Post
Nah, electric drums etc., no good - they always slow down!
Really don't get your quote
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  #33  
Old 09-17-2019, 06:57 PM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is offline
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Originally Posted by slooky View Post
Really don't get your quote
Silly Moustache was a real, accomplished drummer at one time. I am not him, obviously, but I am guessing that he means that programmed drums run at exactly one speed. A real drummer can adjust to everyone else. If the band's adrenaline is up, as it usually is during a performance, a real drummer can make adjustments to the increased tempo that often results from an amped-up performance.

I am just guessing based on my own experience. Maybe Silly Moustache will see this and respond.

- Glenn
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  #34  
Old 09-18-2019, 06:44 AM
MikeBmusic MikeBmusic is offline
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A drummer who can KEEP the tempo steady is a real asset. The band follows the drummer, not the opposite.
You'd realize how important a steady tempo is if you ever played in a band with a drummer who couldn't (and refused to use a click track or metronome for countdown).
2 minute Beatles songs played too fast are really short!
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  #35  
Old 09-18-2019, 07:16 AM
Nama Ensou Nama Ensou is offline
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Originally Posted by MikeBmusic View Post
A drummer who can KEEP the tempo steady is a real asset. The band follows the drummer, not the opposite.
Absolutely true, with the one caveat, the singer gets to determine what that tempo is, not the drummer.

Quote:
You'd realize how important a steady tempo is if you ever played in a band with a drummer who couldn't (and refused to use a click track or metronome for countdown).
The drummer I just auditioned last week talked about how he always plays with a metronome in his ear, but unfortunately he didn't while playing with me, which we're going to talk about going forward or it's not going to happen at all.

On the other hand, I have played with drummers who don't need the click, but they don't seem to be nearly as common as I'd wish they were.
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  #36  
Old 10-14-2019, 04:53 AM
Murphy Slaw Murphy Slaw is offline
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I mostly, usually prefer no drums in Acoustic/Americana stuff.

The same goes for Bluegrass...
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  #37  
Old 10-14-2019, 07:37 AM
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KevWind KevWind is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glennwillow View Post
Silly Moustache was a real, accomplished drummer at one time. I am not him, obviously, but I am guessing that he means that programmed drums run at exactly one speed. A real drummer can adjust to everyone else. If the band's adrenaline is up, as it usually is during a performance, a real drummer can make adjustments to the increased tempo that often results from an amped-up performance.

I am just guessing based on my own experience. Maybe Silly Moustache will see this and respond.

- Glenn
Hard to tell what Silly meant I took it as tongue in cheek irony, meaning "slows down" might be a complaint about a real drummer ???

But to clarify a bit the notion that
Quote:
programmed drums run at exactly one speed".
is actually only correct if one intentionally (locks the midi notes to the grid). On actual "programed drums" .

And perhaps to back up a bit further first we should probably define what is meant by the terms " Electric " drums and "Programed" as well

Because right off the bat, the term "Electric drums " is a misnomer.

There are "Electronic" drums which are a physical drum kit, played by a human drummer and timing wise are no different than a regular drum kit.

There are/were Drum machines both physical boxes, first analog and then digital.
That were locked tempo.

There are now digital virtual instrument drum kits and drum machines, that can be locked to the grid--OR--can be programed to vary in timing or be physically played in via a midi keyboard or pad , and can be as varied in time as any drummer paying a physical drum kit ---- from pretty good, to truly awful---more often than not my playing in via keyboard falls into the latter case


And finally (not to anyone in particular) the answer to the OP was and still is "IT DEPENDS" and is totally and only based on what you the producer/performer/songwriter are trying to accomplish, and what YOU feel best serves the song. I am sorry but glittering generalities one way or the other ( while perfectly fine for stating personal preferrence) , are simply insufficient to rise to level of "informing" artistic choice.
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Last edited by KevWind; 10-14-2019 at 07:59 AM.
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