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  #16  
Old 06-28-2013, 10:28 AM
Viking Viking is offline
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Originally Posted by kwakatak View Post
All talk of finishing aside: oak is a hard wood to work with if you're new to woodworking. I tried making cam clamps out of red oak and it really made my little bandsaw strain - the wood was literally burning as the blade was cutting through it. Obviously I needed a better blade. I can only assume that I'd have to be diligent about keeping my planes sharp and use a lot of sandpaper and elbow grease to work with it as well. As for pore filling, I'd assume that Z Poxy resin might work great with it. Do a search on Youtube for "Todd Stock pore filling". For his demonstration he was working with maple which is also a very dense wood.
Yeah, I've got a timberwolf resaw blade on my band saw, waiting to resaw the oak. I don't think it will be a problem. I'll take it slow. But we'll see.
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  #17  
Old 06-28-2013, 12:32 PM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
In my experience, it's no worse than hard maple. Yes, you need a better blade.




Uhm, maple is a "closed pore" wood and doesn't require pore filling.

An old-fashioned paste pore filler works well on oak, as it does on rosewoods and other open-pored woods.
Oops. You're right. My bad. My noobness is showing (blushes.) I defer to your wisdom.
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  #18  
Old 06-28-2013, 01:51 PM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Originally Posted by kwakatak View Post
Oops. You're right. My bad. My noobness is showing (blushes.) I defer to your wisdom.
Yeah but soft maple...
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  #19  
Old 06-28-2013, 03:36 PM
ewh2 ewh2 is offline
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Originally Posted by redir View Post
Yes sure I have a build thread on another luthiers forum. It was part of a challenge competition so it's not your usual build but it really is an outstanding sounding guitar and I definitely plan on building more with oak and possibly pine top if I can find more of it.

http://luthiersforum.com/forum/viewt...=10133&t=37566

IDK if you have to be a member to see pics if so let me know and I'll just post a few.
I read that thread and watched the videos.

You my Sir, are a artist of the highest order. It's 'found art' in a great way.

Great job.
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  #20  
Old 06-28-2013, 07:25 PM
Viking Viking is offline
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Originally Posted by redir View Post
Yes sure I have a build thread on another luthiers forum. It was part of a challenge competition so it's not your usual build but it really is an outstanding sounding guitar and I definitely plan on building more with oak and possibly pine top if I can find more of it.

http://luthiersforum.com/forum/viewt...=10133&t=37566

IDK if you have to be a member to see pics if so let me know and I'll just post a few.
Yeah, I hope you don't mind if I steel some ideas from your build. Some of that is just too good to resist.
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  #21  
Old 06-28-2013, 09:02 PM
Viking Viking is offline
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Originally Posted by kwakatak View Post
All talk of finishing aside: oak is a hard wood to work with if you're new to woodworking. I tried making cam clamps out of red oak and it really made my little bandsaw strain - the wood was literally burning as the blade was cutting through it. Obviously I needed a better blade. I can only assume that I'd have to be diligent about keeping my planes sharp and use a lot of sandpaper and elbow grease to work with it as well. As for pore filling, I'd assume that Z Poxy resin might work great with it. Do a search on Youtube for "Todd Stock pore filling". For his demonstration he was working with maple which is also a very dense wood.
So I used my timberwolf blade for the first time tonight, resawing a piece of scrap white oak. Wow. Yeah, you just need a better blade. My band saw only has a 1/2 HP motor, and it didn't even balk at the 5.5 inches of oak I asked it to resaw. I have a 12" band saw, and the blade is an 80" long, half inch thick, 3TPI.

Here is a link to the blade on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Here's a shot of the wood I resawed tonight. Fairly consistent thickness. I might get 2 whole sets out of the quarter sawn white oak. Also pictured here are the pillow block bearings and the pulleys for my drum sander. The main drum shaft should arrive tomorrow. I'll spend the day cutting the disks for the drum.



Also pictured here are the beginnings of my rosette. I'm thinking I'd like to do a tiled rosette, with alternating pieces of oak and something else.

Last edited by Viking; 06-28-2013 at 09:41 PM.
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  #22  
Old 06-28-2013, 09:14 PM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Viking View Post
Yeah, I hope you don't mind if I steel some ideas from your build. Some of that is just too good to resist.
I'm doing the ebonized oak, heard about it before and was thinking about using it but after seeing the results I will try it. On the topic of pine top guitars, another member of that forum did a guitar with pine also.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=e0ht46wafN0#!
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  #23  
Old 06-28-2013, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
I'm doing the ebonized oak, heard about it before and was thinking about using it but after seeing the results I will try it. On the topic of pine top guitars, another member of that forum did a guitar with pine also.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=e0ht46wafN0#!
That's a really nice sounding guitar. All from a pine top too....

I had also heard of ebonizing wood from somewhere else, but I was only going to use it on the finger board and bridge. I might have to give that burst a try. Gives the guitar an instant aged look that is quite appealing.
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  #24  
Old 06-28-2013, 10:17 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Originally Posted by Viking View Post
I have a 12" band saw, and the blade is an 80" long, half inch thick, 3TPI.
For resawing, use the widest blade your saw will take, such as 3/4", 3 TPI, skip tooth. The wider the blade, the more regular the result. You'll know when the blade starts getting dull by the fact that it cuts less straight - wanders more - and requires more force or starts to burn the wood, rather than cut it cleanly.
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  #25  
Old 06-29-2013, 10:46 PM
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I spent today getting started on the drum sander. I've got the foundation of the sander, bearings, drum shaft, motor, pulleys and v belt all in place. The motor is an old circular saw that was no longer cutting straight for some reason. Instead of the blade, I've mounted a small pulley there. Here's the setup.





At some point, I'm going to want to replace the motor with something a bit quieter... Cause holy cow that thing is freaking loud. A circular saw is loud enough. Did you know, that when you bolt it to something like a big piece of wood, it gets a lot louder?

Also, I'm going to put together an integrated dust collection system. I'm going to build an impeller that runs on the same shaft as the drum, a dust hood, and use some dryer hose or something to pipe air from the drum chamber to an intake manifold, through the impeller, and ultimately out a filter or collector of some kind.

Something similar to how Matthias Wandel(freaking wood working genius) did his, except mine will run on the same shaft as the sander. At least, that's the plan. We'll see how well it works.
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  #26  
Old 06-30-2013, 06:32 AM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Just as I saw the picture I thought, 'That is going to be loud'. Then I read you saying it was loud and I had a chuckle.

I would forget about the integral dust collector. I do not think you have the hp with the current motor. It adds a fair amount of complexity and it is easier to run a separate blower.
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  #27  
Old 06-30-2013, 07:37 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Wow. You're gearing up for the long haul! You obviously have some sort of technical background. I envy you. I'm more the artsy fartsy type who "guesstimates" and learns to live with the inevitable flaws. You should have no problems but if you do know that there's no shame.
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  #28  
Old 06-30-2013, 08:38 AM
BradHall BradHall is online now
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I am impressed by your ingenuity. On the motor, you could dampen the noise by putting a rubber or cork sheet or isolating washers where it is connected to the bench. Although short on horsepower, most circular saws have a high rpm. Could you regulate the speed and decrease the volume? I would think torque is as important as speed on the drum.
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  #29  
Old 06-30-2013, 02:41 PM
Viking Viking is offline
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Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
Just as I saw the picture I thought, 'That is going to be loud'. Then I read you saying it was loud and I had a chuckle.
It was an object lesson in the amplification of acoustic energy! It would have been even louder, and the tone even better if the base board had been thinner!

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Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
I would forget about the integral dust collector. I do not think you have the hp with the current motor. It adds a fair amount of complexity and it is easier to run a separate blower.
Hmmm. We'll see. I'm going to build the impeller anyway. Part of my problem is one of cash flow. I have lots of dreams and desires... but not enough cash to make all of them happen right now. So, I'm going to cheep route on several fronts for now. If I do a separate dust collector, that will mean I need another motor.

And even if this motor is underpowered for the tasks I am asking it to perform, building the impeller will not be a waste of time, cause I'll just detach it from the sander and attach it to another motor when I get one.
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  #30  
Old 06-30-2013, 03:00 PM
Viking Viking is offline
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Originally Posted by kwakatak View Post
Wow. You're gearing up for the long haul!
I am indeed. I'm quite serious about this pursuit. I have some rather grandiose visions of where I want this to ultimately go. Though I know they will take time, money and lots of energy (and perhaps a fair amount of blood)...

Some of you may have read some of my comments on how one goes about educating one's self on a topic as complicated and encompassing as this... I'm a software engineer. Self trained and taught, which is to say I have no formal training or schooling in my career field. I have not felt this passionate about learning something new since the days I began teaching myself how to write software over ten years ago.

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Originally Posted by kwakatak View Post
You obviously have some sort of technical background.
I don't know about technical, but being a software engineer perhaps gives me a frame of mind that inherently enjoys immersion in complex systems. Code and computers... wood and glue. Each are systems with many variables. It's all about trying to see the big picture, while maintaining a focus on individual details and using some critical thinking skills about those details and how they affect the whole.

Course, who knows. I might string up my first guitar and the top totally explodes under the stress.

Some have taken my comments as arrogant. I don't think they are. I think I am simply confident in myself and okay with potential failure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwakatak View Post
I envy you. I'm more the artsy fartsy type who "guesstimates" and learns to live with the inevitable flaws. You should have no problems but if you do know that there's no shame.
I have no doubt that I'll make my share of mistakes.

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Originally Posted by BradHall View Post
I am impressed by your ingenuity.
Why thank you.

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Originally Posted by BradHall View Post
On the motor, you could dampen the noise by putting a rubber or cork sheet or isolating washers where it is connected to the bench. Although short on horsepower, most circular saws have a high rpm. Could you regulate the speed and decrease the volume? I would think torque is as important as speed on the drum.
I have thought that a dimmer switch in the electronics might be a good idea, especially knowing that the typical circular saw runs at 5000 RPMs, give or take. One of the successful drum sanders I've seen runs at around 1000 RPMS. Assuming my motor is running at 5K RPMs(which, I don't actually know how fast it's running), and the pulleys I'm using afford me an RPM reduction factor of .44, that means my drum will be spinning at 2200 RPMS, which is a bit fast. A dimmer switch could bring that level down to a more reasonable (and safe, I don't want the drum to fly apart) speed, though at a cost to torch and HP from the motor. So we'll see. I might have to bite the bullet and go get a different motor. But for now, I'll play with this one and have some fun. I'll just stay out of the line of disintegration in case the drum comes apart.
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Last edited by Viking; 06-30-2013 at 07:57 PM.
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