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  #16  
Old 05-26-2012, 05:06 PM
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KevWind KevWind is offline
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Originally Posted by Ty Ford View Post
Of course, there's the presumption that the teachers teaching can adequately cover the material.

I know of one college at which the teachers know how to teach, but their knowledge of Pro Tools (or any other daw software) was barely existent.
I went there to give a few lectures and was surprised by what the teachers didn't know.

Regards,

Ty Ford
In my case the opposite was true, Perhaps It's a mater of which collage.
My home studio is personal not commercial. And I have not and do not make my living in the audio industry, so I would not claim to be a professional . I am I suppose what one would call a serious home recordist. And have committed a fair amount of time energy and money to recording.
I have been recording with Pro Tools since 2003 I am primarily self taught with the exception of a one week session at Home Recording Boot Camp and I just last fall and winter took two online courses at Berklee. Now prior to these ,I could of course record, mix, edit, comp and had done a lot of experimentation with plug in EQ, reverb, delay, compression ect.

Quite frankly I was astounded at what I did not know, my knowledge was basic and functional but limited. I was extreamly pleased at the wealth of information and how well taught the Berklee courses were.
They were two of the more advanced courses in mixing in Pro Tools and fit my situation and learning needs and desires perfectly. I feel fortunate.
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  #17  
Old 05-27-2012, 11:45 AM
Joseph Hanna Joseph Hanna is offline
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Joe,

You do know that not all of Hollywood eats its young, right?
LOL...you're probably right Ty but from my vantage point it sure does seem like it
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  #18  
Old 05-27-2012, 12:44 PM
Ty Ford Ty Ford is offline
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:0

Joe,

My best healing thoughts for you.

Regards,

Ty
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  #19  
Old 05-27-2012, 08:42 PM
DonM DonM is offline
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Gosh I dunno Don. This is (at least in post audio world of Hollywood) where many actually make a great living, is just plain wrong. The time-lines and deadlines are deadly. The pressure is often unbearable. The competition, especially since it's a good paying gig, is fierce. No Head of Production....none....never...ever would hire a guy that says I know Pro Tools but I'm also good at stand alone 4-track recorders. The truth is in at least two facilities I work in they require a mandatory afternoon of test mixes on Pro Tools to even be considered for a job. Being good in Logic (which by the way I am Apple Certified in) or Sonar or Digital Performer means nothing...zip. Those are skills this industry is NOT interested in...period.

No offense man but it really seems like a lot of schools have their head in the sand when it comes to real world "jobs" in the production world. Post or music. A week spent here in Hollywood jumping from one production facility to another would reveal an ENDLESS parade of Pro Tools bays.

I've done the hiring here for the last 8 or so years. I LOVE Logic. I'd NEVER, EVER, in a million years hire a Logic guy. It doesn't makes sense and no matter how sharp an engineer he or she might be he or she would be swallowed whole in an afternoon of deadlines, PC's, screaming production managers and stressed out Avid editors.

Your position is not a realistic view of the industry I'm in.
Joe:
No offense taken at all - and I both understand and live the same reality in my work. Our deadlines can be 'deadly' as well - just a couple of hours before we go to air. And 'standards' are a requirement to move assets quickly and reliably between production and post before we place them.

You might be reading more into my comments than I am I saying. My only 'opinion' is avoiding the word 'standard' when referring to a piece of software.

WRT the 'zip' value of the other tools - we do disagree on that. I don't see the need for an 'artist' to be consumed by what we do in the engineering side of audio. They need to create. I can work with any format or assets created by any artist. Their goals and methods are private to them and their sometimes solo phase of their work. I just don't think they need to work in the same software that I am going to do post on their raw elements.

Regarding schools and the head in the sand mentality - I do see that where I teach - which is why I have moved my lab to PT - for that exact reason.

Finally I do love working in multiple products, that has always been one of my personal commitments.

Best

-D
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  #20  
Old 05-27-2012, 10:15 PM
Joseph Hanna Joseph Hanna is offline
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Yes of course Don....I think we're basically saying' the same thing here. For what it's worth I absolutely do love Logic and have often recommended it provided the right scenario. I'm not a Pro Tools fan boy. I'm certified on both Logic and PT and I firmly recognize both platforms glaring strengths and weakness. As you've already mentioned its the curiousness of college level classes teaching something other than PT that leaves me scratchin' my head.
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  #21  
Old 05-28-2012, 07:20 AM
DonM DonM is offline
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J:
Trying to avoid going off topic too much here... We run 4 PT 9 systems and haven't moved to PT10 - waiting out on the 64bit release - considering the HDX platform - Did your facility move to 10 ... and are you running on 10.7? Just wondering...

-D
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  #22  
Old 05-28-2012, 08:06 AM
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KevWind KevWind is offline
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J:
Trying to avoid going off topic too much here... We run 4 PT 9 systems and haven't moved to PT10 - waiting out on the 64bit release - considering the HDX platform - Did your facility move to 10 ... and are you running on 10.7? Just wondering...

-D
Yes I would be interested also . After 7 yrs running PTLE last winter I bit the Bullet and got a new Mac Pro and HD Native . Also because of taking the two Berklee courses I did not want risk changing to 10. So I am at 9.0.5 and S.L. 10.6.8., particularly because the platform was running so well and several mixes we worked on were in excess of 50 tracks and involved 60 to 70 plug ins. My set up ran these flawlessly without having to bounce down ,which those in he class on LE had to do.
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  #23  
Old 05-29-2012, 07:43 AM
Ty Ford Ty Ford is offline
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What we have is a semantic difference.

I think Joe's right. In the Hollywood Postproduction industry, it probably is the standard at this time. Although I recall a past time when WaveFrame may have had the edge, so changes may occur in the future.

Hollywood TV postproduction may well crash any Pro Tools student if he/she is not prepared. Putting new hires in the hot seat is one way to test their abilities, but it's more about testing their ability to work under pressure, not necessarily about how well he/she knows Pro Tools. That's a performance thing and is wholly different thing than knowing Pro Tools.

Some folks can learn to work "hot", "live" or whatever you want to call it, some can't. I know some studio folks who absolutely do NOT like mixing live. I know some who do both. I know some live sound people who know a lot about sound and have great ears, but are lost in front of Pro Tools.

It's a big world. "Can't we all just get along."

Regards,

Ty Ford
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  #24  
Old 07-31-2012, 05:21 AM
kevbroce kevbroce is offline
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My rehearsal studio in Burbank just purchase 2 HD24's, soooo....

This is my perspective from running the Audio Department at a rehearsal studio. Most of what we are rehearsals for live performances and musical performances on Television. There are also lots of television and commercials involving music filmed and recorded here. My company owns some 003's and a couple of MOTU's for playback purposes, but we're not a recording studio. If someone want to use our studios to record beyond 2tracks they're bringing their own gear or we're renting it form elsewhere.

Anyways, we rarely see Logic in the studios. Minimum, 85%(+) of the time, if there are backing tracks involved, they're running ProTools, 10%(maybe) of the time they're on an HD24. The rest is spread between Logic and others.

If they're recording something beyond 2-track to a CD, they're running ProTools.

If it's video, they're running ProTools.

The only time I see Logic or others being used is when one of the artists are running tracks that they them self have created. If there is someone in the room who is being paid to run audio from a computer, they're using ProTools. It's the standard, it's what's expected in the industry. If someone needs to send you stems last minute, or change stems, or add parts or whatever, they're expecting you to work in ProTools. I see a lot of the same guys come through working for different artists. Someone wasn't available for a gig, or a tour, so they production manager brought in another guy. He's going to get the same files as the last guy, so they both better use the same program. The production manager isn't going to replace the ProTools guy with a Logic Guy.


Now personally, I prefer Logic over ProTools. Probably because it was what I was taught most in college, maybe more so because my professor is the man who write's the official Apple book on Logic. Hard to find someone more qualified. To me Logic is a better creation tool, I've had an easier time writing and making music from scratch. I prefer it's midi setup, it's take folders (thought I think PT caught up eventually). Seems like quite a few composers use Logic.



In my line of work, my Logic skills are nearly worthless. Using Logic taught me lots of production skills and gave me DAW experience, which is useful, but I would have benefited much much more by learning PT's. Luckily I wasn't interested in a job using either, live sound is more my gig.
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  #25  
Old 06-18-2013, 06:39 PM
myfingershurt myfingershurt is offline
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I don't know much about pro tools.

I have used the LE versions off and on through the years.

I started with Cakewalk years ago up to Sonar.

Recently moved to Logic.

I love the idea of distributed processing (Logic NODE) available with Logic Pro. I have a few Macs around my house so it works nice.

I have no idea if Pro Tools uses distributed processing, but doesn't that feature give Logic Pro some clout?

I never hear anyone mention this feature.
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  #26  
Old 06-18-2013, 06:57 PM
BarryR BarryR is offline
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The original post was from over a year ago...He probably graduated by now and can tell us if he is still in the field !!
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  #27  
Old 06-20-2013, 01:43 PM
muscmp muscmp is offline
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while i am not in the industry, i've come to use protools, logic, ableton live and reason in my endeavors. i find it fairly easy to go from one daw to another since they seem to basically do the same thing. what differences there are make using them much more fun to me.

play music!
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