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Old 02-07-2019, 08:00 PM
jimbag jimbag is offline
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Default what type of glue will survive steam bending?

I want to add a thin line of ebony to my binding strips before installation, and I am wondering what type of adhesive to use that will survive the steam bending process? Thanks
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:01 AM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
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I have heard that Titebond III is the one, but I have not tried it.
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:06 AM
Puerto Player Puerto Player is offline
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It's kind of a long story, but Gorilla glue is the strongest glue I've found. I use it for Spearguns as well as pontoon boats. Tightbond III failed in less than 24 hours, Gorilla glue is going on 7 years and still holding delaminating marine plywood. I used/tried very expensive 2 part wood epoxy too, failed in 24 hours. Buddy of mine makes hand made laminated gun stocks and it's all he uses too. Gorilla Glue baby.
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:45 AM
hat hat is offline
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There is a glue called Resorcinol that is what they use for outdoor plywood, wooden aircraft propellers, wooden boats,etc. it is waterproof, resistant to high heat, won't delaminate and stronger than epoxy. Here's a link to a site that tells about it. I'm not saying it's what you want to use, just putting it out there -
https://christinedemerchant.com/adhe...esorcinol.html
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:41 AM
Monsoon1 Monsoon1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hat View Post
There is a glue called Resorcinol that is what they use for outdoor plywood, wooden aircraft propellers, wooden boats,etc. it is waterproof, resistant to high heat, won't delaminate and stronger than epoxy. Here's a link to a site that tells about it. I'm not saying it's what you want to use, just putting it out there -
https://christinedemerchant.com/adhe...esorcinol.html
Interesting stuff. Developed in 1943.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:23 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hat View Post
There is a glue called Resorcinol that is what they use for outdoor plywood, wooden aircraft propellers, wooden boats,etc. it is waterproof, resistant to high heat, won't delaminate and stronger than epoxy. Here's a link to a site that tells about it. I'm not saying it's what you want to use, just putting it out there -
https://christinedemerchant.com/adhe...esorcinol.html
Interesting. Thank for posting the information.

One potential issue is, "Water content of the 2 parts to be joined must be similar and around 12%." Most furniture and instrument making uses wood that is 6 to 8%. The long clamping time and nasty VOC's wouldn't make it very nice to work with for instruments.


I've used Titebond I - or similar - for years for laminating wood bindings/purflings. It mostly holds for standard binding bending - not soaked or steamed for long periods. There is the occasional localized failure that is easy to re-glue after bending. Titebond III would probably be a good/better choice, with its water-resistance.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:24 AM
Dino Silone Dino Silone is offline
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I apologize for not answering the question asked, buy I have to ask: Why steam bend? Iíve bent edge glued panels for sides, where they were glued with Titebond Original. No problem. (I really donít believe the II or III versions have any use in guitar building. Ditto Gorilla glue, which creeps.) Iíve always used a bending pipe, with the wood as dry as I can get away with. Iíve heard of people even doing this with hide-glued pieces. Steam is another story...
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:28 AM
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Bruce Sexauer Bruce Sexauer is offline
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I use Titebond II to glue my purflings to my bindings before I bend them. I do not use additional moisture however, and bend them dry. I have found it is a good idea to let the glue dry for a full day before bending.
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Old 02-08-2019, 10:10 AM
redir redir is offline
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I have used either regular TB or CA laminate purfs but I also bend dry too.
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:18 AM
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Rodger Knox Rodger Knox is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hat View Post
There is a glue called Resorcinol that is what they use for outdoor plywood, wooden aircraft propellers, wooden boats,etc. it is waterproof, resistant to high heat, won't delaminate and stronger than epoxy. Here's a link to a site that tells about it. I'm not saying it's what you want to use, just putting it out there -
https://christinedemerchant.com/adhe...esorcinol.html
Also known as Asian Mystery Glue.
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:47 AM
Edgar Poe Edgar Poe is offline
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If the glue did not soften enough to flex as it's being bent, wouldn't that mean the bend would be very difficult to accomplish. In my mind it's like epoxy glued neck joints, they hold up well under stress and but if you try to remove them, they just don't co-operate.
That being the purpose of that type adhesive in the first place.
JMHO

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Old 02-08-2019, 11:55 AM
hat hat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodger Knox View Post
Also known as Asian Mystery Glue.
That's funny! I use this glue a lot for laminating necks. It holds great, and has a very thing brown glue line that blends in well with most woods. It dries very hard, unlike epoxy, that always retains a bit of pliability.
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Old 02-08-2019, 01:55 PM
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Halcyon/Tinker Halcyon/Tinker is offline
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What exactly do you mean by steam bending?

Something different that the usual hotpipe or blanket/bulb style bender?

FWIW, I use TB3 to attach purflings, but that's the only thing I use it for. It works very well, and has greatly reduced the amount of delam/buckling that I got with TB1. Often I will go from glueing them on, sanding them flush, and bending them in the space of an hour with no problems.
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Old 02-08-2019, 05:12 PM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
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Quote:
If the glue did not soften enough to flex as it's being bent, wouldn't that mean the bend would be very difficult to accomplish.
Not in this case, where the bend is perpendicular to the glue line (side purfling).
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:35 PM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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I used Titebond 3 on my only attempt at prelaminating rosewood binding strips with purfling strips. It didnít delaminate but IIRC I didnít have to heat it too much to get the rosewood to bend.
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