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  #61  
Old 03-31-2011, 04:14 PM
fingerpickerguy fingerpickerguy is offline
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I don't know what to think of this. I believe this guy might be right, from another forum I post on. Some of you have seen my videos. I record with an ipod *rolls eyes*

"It seems like you're doing everything you can to get bad recorded tone. It sounds like you've recorded it in one great big tunnel. The tone is distant, echoed, thin and amateurish. Your recorded tone sounded bad a year ago, and it still sounds bad. The other people here won't tell you that, they'll be dishonest with you because they don't want to hurt your widdle feelings, they'll criticize my view because they don't like me, they'll do everything except tell you the TRUTH. The truth is your recorded tone sux.

When recorded tone sux, people will pay a LOT less attention to the song, the singing and the playing.

You need serious help in how to record an acoustic guitar and voice. Get that help, and LISTEN to the advice. Otherwise your recorded sound will not reach a reasonable, listenable quality.

Ok, now it's over to everyone else, who'll tell you that I'm just an and that you sound GREAT, and how you're improving every week, and stardom is just around the corner for you"


So I tend to think it's difficult to get a good recorded tone with a video capturing device. It seems like it's either record audio only and forget the video or hire a production company to get a good quality video / audio.

I'm all ears if anybody has any advice. My goal is to get the music seen and heard, but according to this guy, I'm doing myself a disservice by releasing anything on the internet as the tone sucks. My goal with posting videos has always been to get some advice on whether the tune sucks or not. I'm primarily focused on playing live, till the tunes get real solid, then go into a studio and have someone else do it. Am I doing myself a dis-service by releasing videos with lackluster tone?
I tend to look at criticism like this as a gift regardless of how rude the delivery comes across. I received some once that ripped on my timing; the tone of his note makes me wonder if it was from the same guy. Put a spotlight on a problem that I knew I had, but was denying. I have pretty much fixed it, but I still plug away at it to try to make it better.

Everyone defines success differently. If you are sharing ideas and this is a hobby, then who really cares? Many people, myself included, focus on the music itself. I have listened to your songs because Short Balding Guy told me that he liked your stuff so I should listen to it as well. So I did. I like it. It is fun. If, however, you want to make a living at this and want a million plus hits, then investing in good gear or a professional recording may make more sense.

At least he didn't say you suck . . .

Chris
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  #62  
Old 03-31-2011, 04:25 PM
fingerpickerguy fingerpickerguy is offline
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I didn't realize the timing was off either. I have a drummer that I'm going to be working with and he says the same thing, all my recordings the beats are way off. That's one of the reasons I started using the stomp box, to have something to try to keep me in time. I've never used a metronome in my life. Perhaps I should. I've thought about it but jeesh, singing, foot stomping, playing guitar, looking at words (as the song is not memorized yet) and finally looking at a metronome at the same time? Jeesh.
You might be amazed out how much benefit there is to playing with a metronome for awhile to get baselined. I use an iPad app. It allows me to store setlists with the settings for each of my tunes. I rehearse both with it and without it. But, it help me lock in the time a little better. The App I use is simply Called Metronome. It was cheap.
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  #63  
Old 03-31-2011, 04:35 PM
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Unreal the prices they charge for this stuff.
Not sure what budget you have, but this stuff doesn't have to be all that expensive unless you want it to look pretty. Just gotta get the right stuff, or you're wasting your time and money. Check out Fran's blog for some tips on the cheap side:

http://www.homebrewedmusic.com/tag/acoustic-treatment/
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  #64  
Old 03-31-2011, 04:56 PM
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Thanks Doug, yeah I was checking that out the other day.

My goal folks is to play good live music first and foremost. I know I can sound awesome if I go into a studio. But the real test, as far as I'm concerned is can I sound awesome in front of 100 - 200 people watching. That's skill IMO.

My hit will come. Don't know if that will bring me wealth, fame fortune or perhaps one of the best things, next to a million dollars of course, is someone coming up to me after a show and telling me how much they love a tune and how they listened to one of my tunes that inspired them to play.

Money can't buy that feeling. As long as that keeps happening, Ima keep playing. Recording is an afterthought as far as I'm concerned. If I can play good live, I can certainly play good in the studio.
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  #65  
Old 03-31-2011, 05:15 PM
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If I can play good live, I can certainly play good in the studio.
I'd actually say they are very different skills. Some overlap for sure, but what works live doesn't always cut it in the studio and vice-versa.
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  #66  
Old 03-31-2011, 06:53 PM
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Well here's my room, or rooms I have to work with. If I was going to do some building of acoustic tiles, which room. The basement is open, more space, but not really a closed room. The closed room is real small. I wish I had built it bigger.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dyFWuGHUtI
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  #67  
Old 03-31-2011, 08:14 PM
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Are you having fun? That's what its all about, who cares what anyone else thinks. keep it up!!

I think I would be recording in the small room.
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  #68  
Old 03-31-2011, 11:20 PM
Fran Guidry Fran Guidry is offline
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Originally Posted by knuckle View Post
Well here's my room, or rooms I have to work with. If I was going to do some building of acoustic tiles, which room. The basement is open, more space, but not really a closed room. The closed room is real small. I wish I had built it bigger.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dyFWuGHUtI
Basically, bigger is better. There are a few issues and smaller makes them worse. Heavy early reflections in the mids and highs make the recording tend to sound "cheap" and "non-pro." Worse, the mics get a dose of cancellation and reinforcement so their effective frequency response changes every time you move the mic or the source. Our ears are pretty good at processing out these problems in live sound, but mics have no such ability, so the problems wind up in our recordings.

At the same time low frequencies have amazing wavelengths, the low E on a standard guitar is almost 14 feet for once cycle. When these waves hit a wall they fold back on themselves, cancel and reinforce, and create pockets of booming bass next to areas with almost none, in different locations for each note.

So bigger is better, at least at the scale that most home recordists have to deal with.

Fran
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  #69  
Old 04-01-2011, 05:59 AM
MattChen MattChen is offline
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Originally Posted by Fran Guidry View Post
Basically, bigger is better. There are a few issues and smaller makes them worse. Heavy early reflections in the mids and highs make the recording tend to sound "cheap" and "non-pro." Worse, the mics get a dose of cancellation and reinforcement so their effective frequency response changes every time you move the mic or the source. Our ears are pretty good at processing out these problems in live sound, but mics have no such ability, so the problems wind up in our recordings.

At the same time low frequencies have amazing wavelengths, the low E on a standard guitar is almost 14 feet for once cycle. When these waves hit a wall they fold back on themselves, cancel and reinforce, and create pockets of booming bass next to areas with almost none, in different locations for each note.

So bigger is better, at least at the scale that most home recordists have to deal with.

Fran
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  #70  
Old 04-01-2011, 08:51 AM
knuckle knuckle is offline
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Yeah, so the space I have is small. I should not even bother and just focus on the live music and head to a real studio when I'm ready.
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  #71  
Old 04-01-2011, 08:59 AM
geokie8 geokie8 is offline
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You’ve been getting a lot of advice, and you’re responding to almost all of it, so I think it’s time for a reboot.

IMO:

1) The room and the recording of your voice are really the only things that need to be addressed. There are, of course, multiple ways to approach these problems and there is a cost/ benefit to each approach. It may require different hardware or it may just require someone with more experience better utilizing what you already have.

2) You don’t need to go into a studio. If Springsteen can release a commercial album (Nebraska) recorded in his bedroom (or was it his kitchen?) onto a 4 track cassette player with two SM-57s, you can figure out how to get a more pleasing sound onto YouTube.

3) It would probably be worth the money to hire a gifted amateur to come to your house and make recommendations and work with you for a few hours. Among the things you’ll get: he’ll make recommendations on your vocal mic, optimize your voice, pick the room, tell you how to optimize the room, recommend hardware/software with best value, and show you the best way to record everything. You’ll save time and money in the long run (and if he likes your music may take a specific interest in you). If you have no idea how to locate someone, try a large church with the most contemporary music in your area.

This has been a great thread and most of us appreciate you putting yourself out there for comments/critique.

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  #72  
Old 04-01-2011, 09:10 AM
knuckle knuckle is offline
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Thanks man, the problem is I have nobody. Otherwise I'd even pay someone to help. I'm on my own. But I do appreciate all the advice.
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  #73  
Old 04-01-2011, 10:59 AM
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2) You don’t need to go into a studio.
Absolutely. This isn't black or white, and it doesn't need to cost a lot to get a decent recording at home. There's also less magic about going to a "real studio" that you may expect. It won't necessarily automatically make everything great. If you check out my you tube videos (in my sig), all the recent ones were recorded in a completely untreated, very small room with a Zoom H4. I think they're acceptable for a home you tube recording.

I have no opinion about the basic premise of this thread, but if you want to capture yourself better on a recording, I'd suggest starting with a target. Find a recording or video that sounds the way you'd like to sound and then start trying to emulate it. You'll likely learn a lot, not only about recording but about your music and performance, and you'll eventually figure out how to capture something that you like.
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  #74  
Old 04-01-2011, 02:17 PM
Gypsyblue Gypsyblue is offline
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Originally Posted by Doug Young View Post
Absolutely. This isn't black or white, and it doesn't need to cost a lot to get a decent recording at home. There's also less magic about going to a "real studio" that you may expect. It won't necessarily automatically make everything great. If you check out my you tube videos (in my sig), all the recent ones were recorded in a completely untreated, very small room with a Zoom H4. I think they're acceptable for a home you tube recording.

I have no opinion about the basic premise of this thread, but if you want to capture yourself better on a recording, I'd suggest starting with a target. Find a recording or video that sounds the way you'd like to sound and then start trying to emulate it. You'll likely learn a lot, not only about recording but about your music and performance, and you'll eventually figure out how to capture something that you like.
Doug, do you use the built in Zoom H4 mics? Or do you use something "better"?
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  #75  
Old 04-01-2011, 03:14 PM
Rick Shepherd Rick Shepherd is offline
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Knuckle,

What are your musical goals? Based on what I have read here:

1.) You play live gigs.

2.) You write your own music and perform your own music.

3.) You plan to record your music in a professional studio.

Question:

1.) What equipment do you use for your live rig?

2.) How would you rate your level of talent in both singing and playing guitar? For example; on a scale of 1-10, 1 being the lowest and 10 being the highest level.

Through the years, I am 50 now, my level of talent with singing has gone down, but my guitar playing has gone up. Within the confines of what I do, I would say I am at about a 6 with my singing, and an 8 with my playing. I think I can improve my singing a point or two with hard work, lessons, etc. With guitar, I think I can improve a great deal more over the long term. My goal is to continue live gigging and become more of a solo guitar player.

If you are willing, please take your Ipod and create another recording with no equipment, just you and your guitar. I would like to hear you just that way, with no PA or guitar amp in the way. Will you do that? I want to hear your raw sound. I put a couple songs up on youtube using an older, non-HD home video camera. I think it sounds just like the way I sound to myself, cheap mic and all, no PA or effects. My youtube name is "rickissinging".

Last edited by Rick Shepherd; 04-01-2011 at 03:25 PM.
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