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  #1  
Old 11-16-2018, 06:37 PM
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Default Violin anyone?

I'm thinking about this for myself for Christmas. It's on my bucket list.

It comes with headphones which is good. I don't want my wife to kill me in my sleep,

Anyone care to advise?
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Old 11-16-2018, 06:48 PM
ssjk ssjk is offline
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I have nothing to offer, but for those who do, could you please include thoughts on how quiet this thing is when it is not amplified at all? Specifically, is it really quiet enough that someone in a different room can't hear it, or is it just not as loud as a normal acoustic.

I too have considered something like this but am wary of spousal reaction.
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Old 11-16-2018, 10:32 PM
51 Relic 51 Relic is offline
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Iím also fascinated by the Violin ( I donít play one ) but my Daughter did during her school years . Watched a great film on Netflix called ď Highly StrungĒ brilliant viewing . Donít forget to check out the brilliant silent Violin range by Yamaha
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Old 11-17-2018, 12:52 AM
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Default Looks good...

If the Cecilio is anything close to Yamaha in quality, you'll be good to go.
I have an older Yamaha ev100, and it is super for quiet practice. Without the headphones, it's just loud enough to hear what you need to hear. With the headphones, its like you're in a concert hall!
Real violins are atrocious to learn on (pitch, bowing noise, learning fifths tuning, etc, etc...) in your household, and neighborhood. The silent (electric) violins are TOTALLY the answer.
I started about a year ago, and I've been able to get to do several intermediate skill level tunes learning on the silent violin. I'd say every other day or so, play your real violin for a while, just to keep up with the differences.
Good luck, and stick with it! There are lots of good (free) lesson sites on youtube...Allison Sparrow, fiddlehed, are just a couple of many. Private lessons with a teacher...a big yes to that as well.
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Old 11-17-2018, 09:38 AM
Rudy4 Rudy4 is online now
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The violin isn't a particularly good "bucket list" instrument, as it requires a lot more woodshedding before your skill set will evolve.

I took it up a couple dozen years ago and got good enough that I could hold my own in jams at music camp. I also spend considerable time playing open back banjo, bass, and mainly acoustic guitar. Violin is something you have to put a lot more dedicated effort into, and as such I ended up not playing it as much as I would have liked. It's also much better to play with others, so not nearly as attractive to sit around the house and play solo.

All that considered, as I approached 65 years of age I decided to sell off my violin related instruments and accessories last year when parring down the number of instruments I own. At some point the realities of how many instruments you play and the amount of time you have left on this earth become something you have to consider.

I also owned a skeletal violin as you are considering, and it's the only practical way to "learn" if you have others in your household.

Also be aware that in a VERY short time you'll learn that you really need a better bow, no matter what the add copy says about the "quality" of the one provided. I opted for a mid-level CODA bow, and that was a couple hundred dollars.

Also you'll run into the need for better strings than what come on economy outfits. Lots of choices, but be prepared to spend a minimum of $50-$75 on a set of strings.

Not trying to dissuade you, but the realities of taking up violin do need to be considered. It's one of the most difficult and time-consuming instruments to learn to play WELL, but also could be considered one of the most versatile and satisfying at the same time.
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Old 11-17-2018, 12:12 PM
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Default Good advice Rudy!

Agree with Rudy...be prepared to let your other instruments sit as you fuss with all the intricacies of the violin. The internet/youtube can really be helpful, but I think/agree that it can also be a total time sucker, and very frustrating. This is a definite case where you might especially notice that being older doesn't help.
In my city we have the Wild Rose Fiddlers, and they have beginner group lessons every Monday evening which are really helpful, and a lot of older and senior people go that are just trying to start out.
I've been at it for almost a year, and am still not comfortable playing for others, but I know I'm getting better, only because I've been putting in the hours, practicing scales, practicing/perfecting bow hold, (Rudy is right...you need a good bow...recommend carbon fibre!!!) and using descent strings. My favorite set is Daddario Pro Arte. Not really an inexpensive venture!
It started for me because I had my family heirloom violin (100 years old) looking at me from the closet for 40 years.
I love the old Irish and Appalachian tunes, and I can do several descently.
You will likely learn the key of D first, as that is definitely the most popular for old time music. My favorite tune in that key is Garry Owen, which begins in a descending D scale (first 8 notes!).
And here's one for you...be prepared to do PHYSICAL WARMUPS each time, otherwise your shoulders and neck muscles will rebel!
BTW I made a mistake in yesterday's post. My silent violin is actually a Yamaha SV100. Bon Chance...
Ciao for now!
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Old 11-17-2018, 12:18 PM
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Default Good advice Rudy!

And oh yes...don't forget the shoulder rest!
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Old 11-17-2018, 09:16 PM
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Good tips everyone. I saw another one for $30 more and I liked the tone better, lol. Its here.

I think I'm going to ask Santa.
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Old 11-18-2018, 06:02 AM
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One suggestion: If your bow is horsehair, store it in the sunlight. Horsehair attracts mites that destroy the horsehair. They infest your violin case and then you either have to fumigate it or throw it away. Sunlight kills mites. How do I know? I inherited a beautiful eighty-year-old Czech violin with a wonderful bow (which is perhaps more valuable than the violin). What it is missing is a case, because bow and violin were stored in a case which became infested with mites, etc....

Bob
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Old 11-18-2018, 09:27 AM
815C 815C is online now
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I played fiddle quite a bit when I was young. I played fiddle in a country band for 3 years and even played it on the stage of the Grand Ol' Opry back in 1985.

Then life with 4 kids and day job forced to prioritize my musical time. I could no longer stay up with my chops on fiddle, banjo, dobro/lap steel, mandolin, keys, and guitar, so I made the decision to focus only on guitar with the limited time I had in my life.

Just recently I've got back into lap steel & mandolin fairly seriously and hope to rosin up the bow more often on my fiddle. I have played it at a few gigs this year and it felt good to be back at it.

And I'll second what has been mentioned above about the importance a good bow. I only own a $100 bow at the present, but I play with some professional fiddlers from time to time who have spent as much on their bows as we spend on guitars. I've tried out some of these high end bows and can't believe the difference they make in my playing! i'm not sure why they make such a significant difference, but they do!

Last edited by 815C; 11-18-2018 at 09:38 AM.
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Old 11-18-2018, 01:45 PM
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I just started working with a group weekly (I usually work solo - harp, accordions), so out came the fdl last week, after several years. I've pretty much moved on from neck-stringed instruments, but this new opportunity calls for fdl. So, round and round we go...
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Old 11-18-2018, 03:06 PM
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I also concur about a good bow. I have a cheap violin I was teaching myself on, and I was at an auction about a year later, and there was a violin being auctioned. Someone played the violin, and it sounded just incredible! I had to have it, and $150 later I did. I took it home, and used the bow on my cheap violin, it makes the cheap violin sound 100% better.
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Old 11-18-2018, 04:22 PM
SpruceTop SpruceTop is offline
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Do It, TBMan, Do It! with either what you've shown us or a decent acoustic violin outfit! I want to do fiddle now that I'm into guitar, banjo and ukulele.
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Old 11-18-2018, 04:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpruceTop View Post
Do It, TBMan, Do It! with either what you've shown us or a decent acoustic violin outfit! I want to do fiddle now that I'm into guitar, banjo and ukulele.
I'm sure my instrument selection is in the "all laminated guitar" category of violins, but hopefully I can get a few decent Celtic melodies out of it
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Serenity (an original - Martin D-16GT version):



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and Alvarez, Seagull, Washburn guitars.
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Old 11-19-2018, 09:30 AM
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My daughter has been playing violin since age 3. She's really pretty good at it now at 7. Granted, the early years were nothing more than trying to incorporate technique into her motor skills, but it worked! We have a great teacher of the Suzuki method, and it is all about working with them at an early age and ingraining the technique into them. She loves it, but does loathe practice sometimes.

We are trying to learn Silent Night as a duet for Christmas this year by ear, but it isn't going so well haha.
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