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  #76  
Old 03-16-2023, 04:02 PM
rstaight rstaight is offline
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I would get the high E to what I thought was good if a piano wasn't handy. Then tune the rest relative.

If it was an attempt at a band everyone would tune, see who sounded best and re-tune to them. Unless there was a keyboard.
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  #77  
Old 03-16-2023, 04:55 PM
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A-440 tuning fork then harmonics.
Still use it from time to time
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  #78  
Old 03-16-2023, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridgepin View Post
Pitch pipe at first then I bought a tuning fork A 440
^^^^^^^^ There's your sign !!!^^^^
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  #79  
Old 03-16-2023, 05:41 PM
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Not very well, that's for sure.

My guitar would be more or less in tune with itself, but who knows?
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  #80  
Old 03-16-2023, 06:31 PM
Murphy Slaw Murphy Slaw is offline
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I honestly don't remember.

I remember the big old Peterson a guy got in the late 70's, and we "lined up" for it, but I'll be darned if I remember what we did before that.
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  #81  
Old 03-16-2023, 08:53 PM
hifivic hifivic is offline
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E A R S!!!!!!
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  #82  
Old 03-16-2023, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chickee View Post
With the record player!
Same here. Get in tune with favourite songs. I had a reasonably good ear for pitch, invariably very slightly sharp. From there I used harmonics which I still favour as final adjustment along with my ears.
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  #83  
Old 03-17-2023, 03:58 AM
cdkrugjr cdkrugjr is offline
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Before tuners we just grabbed the strings in our teeth and wrestled it into the right pitch.

Oh by “Tuner” you mean the pedal/clip, not the thing you twist . .

General case, E from the piano, then from the frets. Specific case, to whatever sound comes out of my stereo or cassette player. Occasionally an 8-Track.
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  #84  
Old 03-17-2023, 04:13 AM
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My actual technique was to tune the G string to the harmonica and then used unisons at the fourth and fifth frets to tune the rest to it.

I like to say that one job of tuning a guitar was my greatest guitar achievement. Why? I used to play for about two hours every day in a stairwell in a dorm building at my college. My first contact with my future wife was when she brought me a friend's guitar and asked me to tune it for the friend. I duly pulled out my harmonica and tuned it. She said "thanks" and left. What's the big deal? My wife is a trained classically trained first soprano and is acutely pitch sensitive. Who knows what would have happened if I had botched that first contact with a bad tuning job?

Bob
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  #85  
Old 03-17-2023, 04:15 AM
Nymuso Nymuso is offline
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When I was a kid the books said to tune to a piano. I didn’t have one. So I got one of those pitch pipes, which I imagine are collectors’ items now, then got an A-440 tuning fork, which I still use, tuning to the A harmonic on the D string and working outward from there.

But when the first electronic tuners came on the market at the then outrageous price of $60 I thought someone was gonna get a Nobel prize for sure. NOW I could tune in a noisy club! Fantastic!
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  #86  
Old 03-17-2023, 07:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Womack View Post
My actual technique was to tune the G string to the harmonica and then used unisons at the fourth and fifth frets to tune the rest to it.

I like to say that one job of tuning a guitar was my greatest guitar achievement. Why? I used to play for about two hours every day in a stairwell in a dorm building at my college. My first contact with my future wife was when she brought me a friend's guitar and asked me to tune it for the friend. I duly pulled out my harmonica and tuned it. She said "thanks" and left. What's the big deal? My wife is a trained classically trained first soprano and is acutely pitch sensitive. Who knows what would have happened if I had botched that first contact with a bad tuning job?

Bob
More importantly - she could have easily tuned it herself by ear, but she sought you out instead!
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  #87  
Old 03-17-2023, 07:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Womack View Post
My actual technique was to tune the G string to the harmonica and then used unisons at the fourth and fifth frets to tune the rest to it.

I like to say that one job of tuning a guitar was my greatest guitar achievement. Why? I used to play for about two hours every day in a stairwell in a dorm building at my college. My first contact with my future wife was when she brought me a friend's guitar and asked me to tune it for the friend. I duly pulled out my harmonica and tuned it. She said "thanks" and left. What's the big deal? My wife is a trained classically trained first soprano and is acutely pitch sensitive. Who knows what would have happened if I had botched that first contact with a bad tuning job?

Bob
Good story.
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  #88  
Old 10-01-2023, 02:35 AM
Sticky_fingers Sticky_fingers is offline
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There’s an old Swedish instruction written down in the 15th century that says something like “tighten the thinnest string until it almost breaks and then use that as your reference”. This is for lutes.
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  #89  
Old 10-01-2023, 03:16 AM
Robin, Wales Robin, Wales is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sticky_fingers View Post
There’s an old Swedish instruction written down in the 15th century that says something like “tighten the thinnest string until it almost breaks and then use that as your reference”. This is for lutes.
I saw one for Appalachian dulcimers from a newspaper article around 1914. It went something along the lines of.."The thickest string is tuned to a good note and then the others a 5th above". I used advice that all the time when I was studying and playing historic mountain dulcimers - it works great!

Just as an aside, there is something significant that your 15thC Swedish instruction and that 1914 article suggests. Folk instruments were often played at far higher tensions than is common now - hence they were louder. Martin only sold strings in medium and heavy gauge. Dreads would have come out of the factory wearing 14s. Folks didn't plug in, or use p.a. systems. Your typical Saturday night barn dance would be purely acoustic. Your instrument, and voice, needed to reach the back of the room.
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  #90  
Old 10-01-2023, 03:29 AM
Silly Moustache Silly Moustache is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chickee View Post
With the record player!

This. Whilst I had some awful pitch pipes - which varied depending on how hard you blew, and then some- one gave me an A-440 tuning fork,
But maybe in 1968, when I first moved into my own flat (apartment - i.e., a Victorian hovel over a tobacconist in west London.

I tuned to this :

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