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  #136  
Old 10-04-2023, 08:29 AM
vintage40s vintage40s is offline
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When restringing, there is nothing as easy, quick and safe as a pipe to wind each string up to pitch.
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  #137  
Old 10-04-2023, 10:49 AM
Silly Moustache Silly Moustache is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankHudson View Post
I didn't have to play the video to remember that SM!

Here's one of mine: the 60s Beatles cartoon series used a slow strum from low E to high E across the strings as bumper music. Even with my bad pitch I'd recall that set of intervals and when I heard it I'd know "my guitar is likely more or less in tune this time."
Beatles Cartoon series ???? Never saw that in the UK
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  #138  
Old 10-04-2023, 11:04 AM
rstaight rstaight is offline
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Before tuners? With a new set of strings, I would get what I thought was good for the high E. The I would tune relative to that.

At my guitar lessons we tuned to the piano. In a band we tuned to each other.
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  #139  
Old 10-04-2023, 11:59 AM
FrankHudson FrankHudson is offline
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Originally Posted by RussellHawaii View Post
Yes, Iíve done that too, but then you donít have 2 hands free. That little wooden box was a great tool.
That does sound cool.
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  #140  
Old 10-04-2023, 12:06 PM
FrankHudson FrankHudson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly Moustache View Post
Beatles Cartoon series ???? Never saw that in the UK
I think I'd heard it was not shown in the UK before. It was a half hour animated show I think shown on Saturday mornings (kids block time on US broadcast TV then). They used voice actors to imitate the Beatles who would have little stories which would lead into playing a couple-three actual Beatles recordings.

wikipedia write up on it
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  #141  
Old 10-04-2023, 01:34 PM
TiffanyGuitar TiffanyGuitar is offline
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When I was by myself, I used a piano for low E and then string to string and harmonics. I still do this sometimes - and everyone really should. Tuners aren't always completely right.

When with others, we would tune to each other and sometimes check harmonics, if someone really sounded out of whack.
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  #142  
Old 12-02-2023, 10:01 PM
Wags Wags is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyGuitar View Post
When I was by myself, I used a piano for low E and then string to string and harmonics. I still do this sometimes - and everyone really should. Tuners aren't always completely right.

When with others, we would tune to each other and sometimes check harmonics, if someone really sounded out of whack.
I agree. I believe (on no particular hard science...) that using the various harmonics will lead to a more balanced tuning for a particular guitar, especially an acoustic. Decades ago I was taught the tuning fork method:

An A note tuning fork works good, whack it against your leg then stick the end on your bridge, tune to it then use overtones for the rest.

The tuning varies a little as you go up the neck so nothing is gonna be perfect. And, you know, tempered scale. It's good to develop your ears by working at manual tuning, just in case you ever need it. In olden days on the gig everyone tuned to my Rhodes.
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  #143  
Old 12-02-2023, 10:22 PM
The Bard Rocks The Bard Rocks is offline
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I simply tuned it to itself. Every once in a while we'd have a piano available to give us a correct starting point. But not usually. If there were more than one instrument, everyone would tune to the one we guessed would be closest to standard pitch. Not accurate of course, but we had the same amount of fun.
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Last edited by The Bard Rocks; 12-03-2023 at 08:08 AM.
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  #144  
Old 12-02-2023, 10:28 PM
curbucci curbucci is offline
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The harmonica
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  #145  
Old 12-03-2023, 03:44 AM
Robin, Wales Robin, Wales is offline
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My tuner battery died at the start of band practice last week. So I just tuned my guitar, banjo and dobro as we all used to... off the root chord from the other band members.

If tuning purely by ear, I tend to tune to the root chord of the song we are about to play rather than tune my open strings to their intervals. For example: say we are playing in Bb (capo 3 guitar for me) I'll get a band member to strum a Bb chord and I'll hold down my Bb chord and tweak the tuning on that to get it right. I am raising or lowering the open (or capo'd) strings, as I can't hold the chord and turn the tuners, but the note I'm listening for is the fretted note of the chord (or open string (capo'd) note of the chord if it has any). So for a song in Bb I'm tuning my 6th fret 6th string, 5th fret 5th string, 3rd fret 4th string, 3rd fret 3rd string , 3rd fret 2nd string and 6th fret 1st string. It's very quick for me to do and gets me "right" with the band.

I use a floating capo with my dobro a lot - and that has to be set by ear during the gig. And, of course, in GBDgbd all dobro players run the 3rd a little flat of equal temperament by ear. Plus you are playing pretty much every single note, double stop, slant and chord by ear during a song while listening to the band for your pitch. A dobro is incredibly stable; once you have set your open G chord tuning before a gig it will stay put - but you are working entirely by ear for pitching and capo placement beyond that.

As for my banjo, well that's in "ballpark" tuning.
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  #146  
Old 12-03-2023, 06:29 AM
EZYPIKINS EZYPIKINS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyGuitar View Post
When I was by myself, I used a piano for low E and then string to string and harmonics. I still do this sometimes - and everyone really should. Tuners aren't always completely right.

When with others, we would tune to each other and sometimes check harmonics, if someone really sounded out of whack.
Pianos are not always right, you know. Especially pianos in Missouri.
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  #147  
Old 12-03-2023, 07:01 AM
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Coler Coler is offline
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My main instrument was always Piano/Keys back then so I pretty much always had something close by to take a tuning from.
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  #148  
Old 12-03-2023, 07:22 AM
Rpt50 Rpt50 is offline
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Originally Posted by Rpt50 View Post
As a kid in the 70s I tuned to the piano we had in the living room (just to get an A, and then tuned relative to that).

At some point I realized that Jimi Hendrix, my favorite artist, was tuning 1/2 step flat. From then on I just tuned to records or the radio.

I actually don't care much for tuners even now, although I will use them in noisy environments or at a gig. If I'm just playing for myself on a daily basis, I'll just get an A or A flat from the piano or my cell phone and tune relative to that.
After reading some other responses, it jogged my memory about my tuning methods in relation to how bad the guitars (that I could afford) were back in the 70s, especially acoustics. I recall having to adjust the tuning depending on the key of the song and the chords used. Some of the guitars I had were never really "in tune". It was more a matter of tuning to a compromise that sounded the best (or least bad).
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  #149  
Old 12-03-2023, 09:21 AM
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https://www.grothmusic.com/p-11116-m...QaAviQEALw_wcB


I used one of these. I still have it. I had one that was C to C. It's probably close to 60 years old, and is slightly flat now! My dad was a song leader at church with vocal music. Since there was no piano, my dad used a pitch pipe. We had several of them lying around. I played percussion and by 9th grade I was the timpani player in the band, so I used one then. It was F to F.
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  #150  
Old 12-03-2023, 09:56 AM
brad4d8 brad4d8 is offline
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I used a blue steel 'A' tuning fork then tuned by ear. Decided I needed an electronic tuner when I had to tune my classical guitar backstage at a choir concert with ~30 people milling around and talking. Until I got a Petersen Strobo tuner, I still had to tweak the tuning to my ear rather than the default on the tuner.
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