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  #1  
Old 03-21-2019, 08:40 AM
Skarsaune Skarsaune is offline
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Default “Easing” a binding edge

On my first guitar build, the binding edge is sharp-ish, due to scraping it flush with the sides/top. It digs into my arm a bit more than I’d like.
Looking at a couple of my other (purchased) guitars, the edge is just slightly radiused. One other amateur builder I spoke to said that edge gets smoothed out by the buffer during the buffing process. As I don’t do a buffing process, obviously I’ll have to do something else - likely grab a file and break that edge. What is commonly done?
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:49 AM
Alan Carruth Alan Carruth is offline
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One good way to do that is with a special scraper; a 'scratch beader'. Basically, you drill a small hole, say 1/8" diameter in a piece of scraper stock, and notch in to it, so that you have an inside corner with a 1/16" radius. Ease the edges outside of the corner so they won't cut; it can even help to put some tape over the metal. This will produce a nice uniform radius on the edge, and does a surprisingly smooth job, even on curly grain wood.
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Old 03-21-2019, 09:38 AM
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Bruce Sexauer Bruce Sexauer is offline
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My method is to use a small double cut file to establish three bevels and then hand sand with 180 followed by 220. I do this just before the final 220 sanding leading to the finish process and it eats up less than 5 minutes. Aside from comfort, the broken edge is important first because surface tension will hold wet finish away from a sharp edge, and second because a sharp edge is much more vulnerable to wear and tear damage.
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Old 03-21-2019, 11:12 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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I use a low-tech solution: a rigid sanding block with 180, then 220 sand paper.

Keep in mind that there are parts of sharp edges that you don't likely want rounded, such as the bindings under the fingerboard extension and at the heel juncture. A sanding block allows me to easily make the transition between rounded and un-rounded edges.

Obviously, both Bruce's and Alan's methods work well too.
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Old 03-22-2019, 02:50 PM
redir redir is offline
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I like Alan's scraper idea that's pretty shapr, pun inteded. I normally just hold a folded piece of 100 grit paper in my hand to get the curve I like then finish sand through 220. Let's just say it gives it that 'hand made' appearance. Really though it's not that hard to get close to even.
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Old 03-22-2019, 07:37 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skarsaune View Post
On my first guitar build, the binding edge is sharp-ish, due to scraping it flush with the sides/top. It digs into my arm a bit more than I’d like.
Looking at a couple of my other (purchased) guitars, the edge is just slightly radiused. One other amateur builder I spoke to said that edge gets smoothed out by the buffer during the buffing process. As I don’t do a buffing process, obviously I’ll have to do something else - likely grab a file and break that edge. What is commonly done?
I never leave the edge sharp with the hope or expectation that the buffer will round them off, i do nothing more complicated than wrap 220 grit sandpaper into a rolled edge, and then sand the edge of my build with my rolled sandpaper, i do this typically before shellacing or sealing the body.

When i do subsequent sanding and levelling of layers, i tend to let my hand with sandpaper roll over the binding

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Old 03-24-2019, 05:10 AM
ruby50 ruby50 is offline
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if you relied on the buffer, wouldn't the finish be gone?
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:58 AM
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Bruce Sexauer Bruce Sexauer is offline
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Rule number one in buffing is not to directly buff the edges: instant burn through and a strong possibility of the guitar being yanked out of the hands.
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