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  #16  
Old 07-10-2010, 09:51 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Can't make it tomorrow or Monday, YJ. Can ya wait?

BTW, are you thinking of any inlays for this one? ;o)
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  #17  
Old 07-10-2010, 07:56 PM
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Probably. I never made it to fix the thickness sander.
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  #18  
Old 07-10-2010, 08:06 PM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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OK, fine. Did you get that La-Z-Boy moved into the shop though?
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  #19  
Old 07-11-2010, 04:13 AM
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Kitchen Guitars Kitchen Guitars is offline
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Nope, but its headed there.
Neil. Why not start building one when you drop by? I have a Mahogany set I'll let you use. For how often we get together it will be McJam 2015 for when its done. But, starting is a good beginning! BYOSP (bring your own sandpaper)

I have so much stuff from my buy out I forget what I have. I found a 3 peice Maple neck blank the former owner tore into but there is still enough meat to make the neck. I just think a Mahogany neck on Sycamore and Adi would look like a sore thumb. Looks like I'll try the Maple. I hear it is like carving stone! For all of the dings I put in the Spanish Cedar I think I will welcome the harder wood.
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  #20  
Old 07-11-2010, 06:44 AM
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John, what happened to the locust you were considering for the neck? Is it too dark for the sycamore, also, like the mahogany? Gotta admit, I'm envisioning the maple neck with the sycamore, and it sounds good -- especially to complement the maple you ran on the back seam.

C'mon, Neil...build a guitar! You're too young for that La-Z-Boy, anyway...
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  #21  
Old 07-11-2010, 07:48 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamaha Junkie View Post
Nope, but its headed there.
Neil. Why not start building one when you drop by? I have a Mahogany set I'll let you use. For how often we get together it will be McJam 2015 for when its done. But, starting is a good beginning! BYOSP (bring your own sandpaper)
Don't tempt me, YJ. You know I'm cooking up an idea in my head but I'm falling back on my latent graphics skills and trying to capture images in my head and scribble them down on paper and maybe even draft them into the computer.

The real trick is getting over there regularly, but you know my deal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamaha Junkie View Post
I have so much stuff from my buy out I forget what I have. I found a 3 peice Maple neck blank the former owner tore into but there is still enough meat to make the neck. I just think a Mahogany neck on Sycamore and Adi would look like a sore thumb. Looks like I'll try the Maple. I hear it is like carving stone! For all of the dings I put in the Spanish Cedar I think I will welcome the harder wood.
See? There ya go! I knew you'd see it my way. Now all I have to do is convince you to put some big old MOP inlays all up and down the neck, maybe put a mustache bridge and a pickguard with all kinds of engraving all over it. All that light colored wood is just the perfect palette.

Hmm, sounds like something I read in an interview with Grit Laskins. YJ, you're corrupting me!
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  #22  
Old 07-12-2010, 07:18 AM
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What do you want me to make a J150? (3/4 J200)!
Oh I liked the idea of the maple neck I just didn't wanna buy it!
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  #23  
Old 07-15-2010, 03:02 PM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Thanks for putting me to work last night, YJ. cutting and sanding braces sure is tedious but I think I'm getting the hang of it. I'm told that chisels are the way to go with the initial shaping though. You treating me like a nugget or somethin'?

BTW, did you figure out that sander?
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  #24  
Old 07-16-2010, 05:12 AM
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You said you had NO tool experience. Work up to the chisels Grasshopper. I watched a lady at Martin shape braces with a chisel. In those hands she did in seconds what you worked at. If you'd tried her moves we would have ended up at the ER lol.
No on the sander. I'll youtube for a tutorial. Yesterday I dug the skunk stripe trench. Sycamore sawdust wants to stay and clump! I saved the sawdust for any OOPS's down the road. I got the back strip in. When I did the first build I only dug in about 1/2 the thickness of the stripe so I had a center hump to sand (and pull out in places) This time I inlaid it flush so I have room to sand. I also shaped the other 2 back braces. I did mine with a band saw and the planer. Shop teacher would have given me an F for safety. If I stick with the design I have many Jigs in mind to simplify the process. I don't want to spend 2 hours on a Jig to save 45 minutes.
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  #25  
Old 07-16-2010, 05:55 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamaha Junkie View Post
You said you had NO tool experience. Work up to the chisels Grasshopper. I watched a lady at Martin shape braces with a chisel. In those hands she did in seconds what you worked at. If you'd tried her moves we would have ended up at the ER lol.
No on the sander. I'll youtube for a tutorial. Yesterday I dug the skunk stripe trench. Sycamore sawdust wants to stay and clump! I saved the sawdust for any OOPS's down the road. I got the back strip in. When I did the first build I only dug in about 1/2 the thickness of the stripe so I had a center hump to sand (and pull out in places) This time I inlaid it flush so I have room to sand. I also shaped the other 2 back braces. I did mine with a band saw and the planer. Shop teacher would have given me an F for safety. If I stick with the design I have many Jigs in mind to simplify the process. I don't want to spend 2 hours on a Jig to save 45 minutes.
Patience, YJ. Maybe that thickness sander just needs a hug. BTW, I think I found a video for ya. Is this kinda like what you got in your shop?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3_2v...eature=related

I dunno man. Looks kinda tough to wrap that sandpaper roll. Maybe you should have your wife do it!














I kid you. I am a kidder. Whatever you do, don't tell my wife that I actually got my hands dirty. I've got a honey do list that requires handy skills I've been claiming not to have.
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  #26  
Old 07-19-2010, 09:26 AM
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I had a great time on Saturday. I left the house at 4am, drove to the mountains near Harrisburg (5 hours) out to Blues Creek Guitars. There were about 60 of us there. Eating, playing guitars. Little mini classes on wood carving heal blocks with Triple C wood carving (the guy is freakin' amazing), John Hall the owner of Bluescreek.com taught Rosette installation and oops repair, Todd Stock showed many joining techniques and probably convinced me to try Hide Glue. Folks with one build under their belt others that spend time learning guitar building abroad. Great to chat how they got there. Many faces I knew from A.S.I.A
I took my thickness sander to learn from a generous volunteer. What curses to use and when and whola my Jet 10/20 was ready for rocknroll Lots of fun. I got home exhausted and inspired around 11pm.
Back to the shop;
The top has been thickness sanded to 3.33mm. My goal is 3.30mm. After I get the "Rosette" done and inlaid I will shave off .03mm from the top. I am not sophisticated enough for deflective testing. I will keep track of the result though. For now, I am working from a 37' LOO blueprint that shows 3.3mm as the example that was measured. Good enough
Neil! Your gonna miss the bending!!!!!
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  #27  
Old 07-23-2010, 05:45 AM
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Default July 23 2010 updates

I have been so busy with photographing gatherings, HS Seniors and parades my personal photo's keep getting shoved aside.
2nd build is coming along. I really haven’t done the books much on this one (so far). But, I am working from a pretty detailed blueprint of a 37 L-OO. And also working off of my build flow from the first build.
Here is a position guide I made from scrap picture frame plastic.
Blues creek was selling beautiful thick plexyglass laser etched versions of this but mine cost nothing to make.


Sycamore really "Gathers" like it wants to go back in. Lots of brushing aside. While light wood is a bugger to hide mistakes on I kept a bunch of Sycamore dust for the inevitable!



Here is Neil’s brace.

and others as they form

installing the back braces after radiusing the glue side to 20'.

Installing the skunk stripe.

Who says a Rosette has to be round?

I made this Sycamore frame to emulate a "Mountain Brook Store" ebay buy silhouette statues frame. The spare piece on the side is one I decided was too dark to match up.
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  #28  
Old 07-23-2010, 05:46 AM
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Default Part two


I then proceeded to line the frame with a nice out line

Lots of work. But it wasn't right. Tossed it on the shelf.
I went back to my Baltic Birch painted statue and ran it through the thickness sander.
The black looks so right. I will see if I can stain the thin wood solid black.

The butterfly will go in and out on magnets.

Glasses for close up have become anyoingly nessessary. I picked up a cheap pair of 1.75 and 3.50 magnification glasses. They really do help.


The wavy design is taking a while to get smooth. I am sure I have a few more hours of balled up sandpaper and aching hands
Here is a close up thought the 3.5 glasses


What do you think about "the Butterfly"?
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  #29  
Old 07-23-2010, 07:16 AM
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Love the butterfly! But I'm also pondering over the existential question: Why are soundholes traditionally round? And yes, I know there are f holes and that some builders are doing crazy things with soundhole positions and shapes, but why, oh why, have guitar soundholes traditionally been round? Is it just an easier shape to cut?!?

As to the glasses: Get used to it, John. I used to laugh at my mother, who had a pair of "readers" in every room of her house; now that's me (and thank goodness I don't have children who would, no doubt, be making fun of me in similar fashion).

Grain of the sycamore is so strange...and so cool...appreciate the images and the update!
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  #30  
Old 07-24-2010, 06:06 AM
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Kitchen Guitars Kitchen Guitars is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt View Post
Love the butterfly! But I'm also pondering over the existential question: Why are soundholes traditionally round? And yes, I know there are f holes and that some builders are doing crazy things with soundhole positions and shapes, but why, oh why, have guitar soundholes traditionally been round? Is it just an easier shape to cut?!?
Most guitars are built by engineers and former engineers Symmetry is a way of life for them!
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