The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #31  
Old 02-23-2009, 02:18 PM
TaylorMade110 TaylorMade110 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 61
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brockgl View Post
The thing that amazes me is how many different responses there have been with so many right and wrong ways. This seems to be a very debated subject, and it's only drilling a hole in a piece of wood (or in my case making an existing hole bigger).
Exactly. It was responses like the ones in this thread that had me almost too scared to just freaking drill a hole, or as in your case (and mine) make an existing hole bigger. Thats why I said screw it. I taped the area, took my 1/2" bit, lined it up with the existing hole, made sure the guitar was braced with my free hand, and drilled the hole. Took less than 30 seconds. Ended up not being scary at all.

I understand all the precaution. My Taylor is my baby. But really, forget all the specialized tools. I am living proof. Just tape and drill. You will be just fine.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 04-22-2009, 01:26 AM
Mike_A Mike_A is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,207
Default

+1 with the spade bit tool! although many think that this tool is to risky to do the job...i drilled my guitar with a 1/2 (12mm actually) spade bit with no problems at all.

i set my drill to the lowest speed possible. put some tape on the area where i would drill.

the spade bit centers itself and doesnt seem to pull the wood. my guitar has a satin finish so i dont know if that made it more unlikely to chip. its like it just scraped off when i was drilling.

it helped my confidence that i had a broken old guitar to practice on before trying it out on my acoustic, an ibanez artwood. after the experience, i think i am confident that this tool can be used on a highend guitar, just be careful of course.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PWoolson View Post
This is the right tool for this job:

1/2" spade bit. Probably $3.79 at any hardware store.
Use the inner drill spade as a pilot and the outer spades to ream the hole. There are two advantages to this bit: 1) the points on the outer spades score the hole before the spades actually drill it. and 2) it doesn't pull material toward you so it won't want to lift the fibers of the hole (see photo of tearout above) It wouldn't hurt to put some tape on area first just in case it gets away from you a little.
Slow and steady wins the race.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 04-22-2009, 04:55 AM
chitz chitz is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Florida
Posts: 6,403
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackstrat View Post
1. Drill a 1/4" diameter hole with a sharp brad point bit.

2. Enlarge the hole to 1/2" using a sharp standard drill bit.

Period, end of story.

Work carefully, and you should have no problem.
Good advice. This works every time!
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 04-28-2019, 08:50 AM
cheer tunes cheer tunes is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 231
Default

Hi, I took my new D18 to my local shop and asked them to drill out the end pin so that I could install a pick up. When I feed the input jack out of the guitar it does not stick out far enough for me to use all of the suggested screws and washers and there is not enough thread on the jack cover where you attach the strap. Is there a chance the hole was not drilled out correctly? The tech used the bit shows below. I'm trying to install an LR Baggs M80. Thanks for your input.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_3061.jpg (29.9 KB, 80 views)
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 04-28-2019, 09:16 AM
cheer tunes cheer tunes is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 231
Default

My bad, upon further inspection I was able to increase the about of threaded jack buy further unscrewing the interior section of the jack.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 04-28-2019, 12:57 PM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,497
Default

I use brad point bits and always tape the location with blue painters masking tape before drilling, is there is no pre-existing end pin hole. When there already is a hole, but it's too small I use a hand reamer.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 04-28-2019, 01:07 PM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,497
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brockgl View Post
The thing that amazes me is how many different responses there have been with so many right and wrong ways. This seems to be a very debated subject, and it's only drilling a hole in a piece of wood (or in my case making an existing hole bigger).
No. Drilling holes in joists and studs to run plumbing and wires is "only drilling a hole in a piece of wood." Drilling a hole in a finished instrument where you care about fit and finish is different (to me). I don't want to scratch, shred or splinter the finish. I don't want to blow out the block on the inside. People can do whatever they want to their instruments, but if you come here asking for advice some of it will come from guys like me who have done it several times and want to save you some trouble.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 04-28-2019, 01:13 PM
Sagebrush Tom Sagebrush Tom is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Indian Hills, NV.
Posts: 629
Default

If you buy an Eastman acoustic they already come drilled from the factory
__________________
2017 E10 00 Eastman
2015 E20 OMSB Eastman
2015 000-15M Martin
2016 00-18 Martin
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 04-28-2019, 01:22 PM
varmonter varmonter is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Northern Vermont
Posts: 2,231
Default

Ive always used the reamer shown in post 34.
Never had any issues. slow and steady. dont
force it keep it level.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 04-28-2019, 01:45 PM
SpruceTop SpruceTop is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rochester, New York
Posts: 6,988
Default

Then again, I bought, and have used the Stewart-MacDonald End-Pin Jack Reamer on about ten installations with no negative results. My advice is if you're going to play the game, step up to the plate and swing with all your might, instead of cheaping out and getting less than desired results, even if it costs you $83 (cost me $69 when I bought it).
__________________
Larrivee D-40M Legacy
Huss & Dalton TD-R
Martin HD-28 (Trance M-VT)
Martin D-18 (Schatten HFN Artist Plus 2)
Martin D Jr (B-Band A1.2N)
Taylor 614ce (ES2)
Taylor 618e (ES2)
Taylor 356ce (ES2)
Taylor 322ce (ES2)
Taylor GS Mini-e Koa (ES2)
Epiphone DR-500MCE (Shadow eSonic2)
Ovation Elite Plus Contour (OpProStudio)
Ovation VXT Electric (two Duncan '59/Fishman Acoustic Bridge)
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 04-28-2019, 04:15 PM
1Charlie 1Charlie is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 979
Default

I am very comfortable with a drill. However, having screwed up one end pin enlargement, that is all it takes to convince me to take it my luthier and spend the $25.

If you must do it yourself, learn from my mistake:

I used a standard 1/2” bit. All was well until I was deep into the hole and the bit clogged and caught, causing the drill to try to spin out of my hand and marring the perfect hole I had drilled up to that point.

If I were to do it over again, I would drill 1/2” deep, pull the bit out, clear the hole and bit of waste wood, reinsert, drill another 1/2”, etc, until the hole extended all the way through the end block. Slowly, and with minimal pressure applied.

Fortunately, the guitar I marred was not of great value.
__________________
Neal

A few nice ones, a few beaters, and a few I should probably sell...
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 04-28-2019, 05:24 PM
BT55's Avatar
BT55 BT55 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: NY
Posts: 1,405
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackstrat View Post
As a long time woodworker I would never use a spade bit on a guitar. Never. For one, it will blow out like crazy on the inside of the guitar.



Also, what good is the reamer if the endblock in the guitar is more than a 1/4" thick? The Stew-Mac reamer will work because it has 1/2" diameter flat. That will work as long as the endblock is thinner than the reamer's flat diameter.



I have drilled for endpin jacks and here is my method:



1. Drill a 1/4" diameter hole with a sharp brad point bit.



2. Enlarge the hole to 1/2" using a sharp standard drill bit.



Period, end of story.



Work carefully, and you should have no problem.



Also, here is a trick for feeding the endpin jack assembly through the hole. Insert a guitar cable that will mate with the endpin jack through the hole into the guitar body. Connect the endpin jack to the cable and pull the cable back through the hole. Voila! Done. Simple.



jack


Totally agree. Stepped bits do not have enough depth to properly drill end blocks. I have them but would never drill a guitar with one. I tape the end and use smaller to larger bits to make a the hole. I’ve never had a problem using this method.
__________________
Taylor V-Class 814ce, 717e BE WHB, 520ce, 454ce, 420 Cedar\Maple, T5z Classic
Martin D18E Retro
Emerald X20
Rainsong H-OM1000N2
Voyage-Air VAD-04
Custom Les Paul
Hot Rod Deville 410, Fishman Loudbox Performer
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 04-29-2019, 08:50 PM
rstanl2 rstanl2 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 38
Default

Get a 1/2” tapered reamer on Amazon, not much $$ One little mistake, will make you sick..it’s worth a few bucks to not have that. Enjoy 😊
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 04-30-2019, 07:54 PM
Rudy4 Rudy4 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,173
Default

The ONLY method I will use is to drill with a Forstner bit.

If it's an un-drilled body then I tape over where the hole will be and drill the new hole.

If there's already ANY hole, including a screw hole for strap button, or anything else where a larger hole was drilled, I FIRST glue in a short section of dowel or wood plug. THEN tape is applied and the new hole is drilled with the Forstner bit.

If you care to take your chances then drill it any way you please.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 04-30-2019, 08:56 PM
bnjp's Avatar
bnjp bnjp is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 2,291
Default

I have a 1/2" unibit and have used too many times to count. I've never damaged the finish and it always makes a clean hole. You have to leave it out of the chuck a little so it'll drill all the way through the tail block.

Note that LR Baggs says 1/2" and Fishman says 15/32" (you can use a 12mm unibit, but I've never had an issue drilling them all 1/2")
__________________
Bryan
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=