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  #16  
Old 02-20-2009, 07:52 AM
brockgl brockgl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce E View Post
A local luthier uses a Unibit.

This is exactly what we have, only it starts at 1/8" and ends at 1/2"... And yes there is already a strap-pin hole in this guitar that I think is 1/4".
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  #17  
Old 02-20-2009, 08:04 AM
random works random works is offline
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Default more help

use a razor blade or very sharp small knife to score the wood on the mark you make for the size you want. Then put masking tape over the area, then pilot drill, the drill. Score the wood as deep as you fell comfortable working. This slices through the wood fibers and keeps the top layer from pulling and tearing.

I have used the score first method on some nice wood, but have never tried it on a guitar.

Good luck!
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  #18  
Old 02-20-2009, 08:09 AM
rgregg48 rgregg48 is offline
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If you are not experienced at the procedure,, why not just pop for a
repairman or Luthier to do the job....
If you screw it up,, you have no recourse,, but if it is messed up
at the shop,, they will fix it.
better than spending for a "use it only once" tool..

Rick
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  #19  
Old 02-20-2009, 08:13 AM
brockgl brockgl is offline
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The thing that amazes me is how many different responses there have been with so many right and wrong ways. This seems to be a very debated subject, and it's only drilling a hole in a piece of wood (or in my case making an existing hole bigger).
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  #20  
Old 02-20-2009, 08:17 AM
brockgl brockgl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgregg48 View Post
If you are not experienced at the procedure,, why not just pop for a
repairman or Luthier to do the job....
If you screw it up,, you have no recourse,, but if it is messed up
at the shop,, they will fix it.
better than spending for a "use it only once" tool..

Rick
I totally understand what you're sayin'.

And if this were a Martin or Taylor or my grandma's heirloom Gibson, you better believe it would be going to a pro. But I like to do things myself, and this guitar is just a player that I expect to get dinged and nicked up over the years, so I figured it would be a good one to learn on.
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  #21  
Old 02-20-2009, 11:30 AM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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Not that it's the only way, but the 1/8 to 1/2" Unibit is safe and reliable.

I would stay away from spade bits.
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  #22  
Old 02-20-2009, 11:36 AM
Sombras Sombras is offline
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I so needed this thread. I'm about to install a K&K PWM and have been fretting over this--even though I have some minor woodworking experience. Thanks!
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  #23  
Old 02-20-2009, 12:48 PM
PWoolson PWoolson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Klepper View Post
Not that it's the only way, but the 1/8 to 1/2" Unibit is safe and reliable.

I would stay away from spade bits.
Interesting. I've never had any sort of problem with a spade. I just slow way down on the pressure when I'm getting close to punching through. Never had a bit of blow out at all.
Different strokes I guess but I certainly wouldn't say this method is WRONG as jackstrat implied.
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  #24  
Old 02-20-2009, 01:02 PM
jackstrat jackstrat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PWoolson View Post
Interesting. I've never had any sort of problem with a spade. I just slow way down on the pressure when I'm getting close to punching through. Never had a bit of blow out at all.
Different strokes I guess but I certainly wouldn't say this method is WRONG as jackstrat implied.
Spade bits are notorious for blow out if the backside of the workpiece is not supported. So unless you can clamp a piece of wood to the end block, pre-drilling with a smaller brad point and enlarging with a conventional bit are far less risky.

But to each his own.

Jack
http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com
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  #25  
Old 02-20-2009, 03:58 PM
Fred Fred is offline
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I installed my own K&K on "nice" guitar. I went the spade-bit route...covered the site with masking tape and had no tear-out on the exterior. However, the bit DID jump just a tiny bit at the outset, so I didn't get the hole exactly where I wanted it. But it's covered by the guitar strap, so nobody, inlcuding me, notices. I SHOULD have done a started hole with a smaller bit, then switched to the spade. Something to think about....
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  #26  
Old 02-20-2009, 06:04 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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I don't question that Paul has had good results. But my concerns about a spade bit are: whether the center point is wide enough to contact the existing hole at the entry point; whether if it does make that contact, it won't still want to walk around a little until the outside spurs dig in (the unibit is single flute, so it self-centers, and stays centered); that there is some tendency to blow out chips on exiting with a spade bit; and that spade bits cut a hole with a relatively rough finish to its walls (not a functional concern here).

Paul has the skill to make a tool that may be suboptimal work. The unibit is more expensive, but much harder to mess up with.
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Last edited by Howard Klepper; 02-21-2009 at 10:15 AM. Reason: typos
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  #27  
Old 02-20-2009, 06:46 PM
Herringbone Herringbone is offline
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Default I must be lucky

I used regular old drill bits with 2 layers of masking tape in a cross pattern. (don't know if that made the diff or not). I had no chipping whatsoever.

It does take some guts to drill a hole in your favorite guitar though.

Good luck

Tim
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  #28  
Old 02-21-2009, 05:13 PM
brockgl brockgl is offline
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I did it with the unibit with perfect results. Thanks everyone for their input. Here is the picture of the drilled hole.

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  #29  
Old 02-21-2009, 06:14 PM
Broadus Broadus is offline
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Looks great. Come do mine!

Bill
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  #30  
Old 02-21-2009, 06:31 PM
rlouie rlouie is offline
 
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nice job!!!!!! very clean...................
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