The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 03-15-2019, 11:34 AM
fregly fregly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 825
Default Buff glossing a satin furch

I have glossed a couple Larrivee satin finishes and it worked out well using fine grit sanding cloth, spraying water with a little washing fluid in. I have a Furch Gsw with a satin finish and would like to do the same. However the Furch finish is much thinner than the Larrivee, 2.7mls or so compared to probably 6. Also the Furch has no pore filler, if this complicates.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-15-2019, 12:32 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 6,329
Default

It depends, in part, on what result you expect.

An un-filled, open pore wood, when its finish is buffed will simply give you a shiny, pitted surface, a long way away from a "mirror" or "piano" finish. If your object is to change the texture of the finish because you don't like the feel of the satin, it might work. Otherwise, I'd suggest you investigate what a shiny, pitted surface looks like and whether or not you want to put in the effort - and risk of sanding through - to achieve it.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-17-2019, 11:56 AM
fregly fregly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 825
Default

The Larrivees turned out well, not mirror, just reflective enough the depth and color came out in the wood, and yes getting rid of arm hiss is nice. I have not come across a non pore filled gloss finish before, though can't imagine it being a negative visually, well, for me
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-18-2019, 04:16 PM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,773
Arrow

Charles gives sound advice, as usual. IMHO, shiny lacquer on unfilled pores always looks amateurish. The satin finish is often used intentionally to hide a pitted surface.

Last edited by John Arnold; 03-18-2019 at 04:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-18-2019, 04:40 PM
cobalt60 cobalt60 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 98
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
Charles gives sound advice, as usual. IMHO, shiny lacquer on unfilled pores always looks amateurish. The satin finish is often used intentionally to hide a pitted surface.
Can't say I agree. Some of the nicest and certainly most expensive classicals and steel-strings have shown some degree of finish sinking into pores, especially over time. This is typical of ultra-thin finishes associated with highly responsive instruments.


Agreed that a prepared satin finish will not buff to a gloss. The exception I can think of is that some people "scuff" a gloss finish to make it appear matte, but that's actually just a micro-scratched finish, not an actual matte process.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-19-2019, 06:05 AM
Quickstep192 Quickstep192 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 979
Default

One thing to think about.

When you sand and polish, the open pores will fill with the swarf from sanding and the compound from polishing and youíll need to get it out.

I donít think Iíve seen an open pore gloss finish. In my experience on furniture, satin is used to simulate a hand rubbed oil finish, so not much gloss.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-19-2019, 08:33 AM
fregly fregly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 825
Default

I seem to recall some Seagull guitars had open pore gloss. Can't think of seeing any others. I didn't look at the Seagulls closely enough to register an opinion on the look. The Furch is Black Walnut and the pores are rather small, not exactly pock marked or anything. I think the main issue will be caution about the thin Furch finish.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-19-2019, 08:55 AM
mercy mercy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Inland Empire, So California
Posts: 4,102
Default

Martin satins buff out nicely. I like the look better than gloss or satin.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-19-2019, 09:23 AM
runamuck runamuck is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,496
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt60 View Post
Can't say I agree. Some of the nicest and certainly most expensive classicals and steel-strings have shown some degree of finish sinking into pores, especially over time. This is typical of ultra-thin finishes associated with highly responsive instruments.
I agree. But unfilled wood looks quite different than finish and grain filler that has shrunk back over the years.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-19-2019, 12:44 PM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,773
Default

Quote:
Some of the nicest and certainly most expensive classicals and steel-strings have shown some degree of finish sinking into pores, especially over time.
Actually, I agree. But finish sinking is different from being unfilled. With finish sinking, the dimples are shallow. One disadvantage with an unfilled surface is that the deeper pores are likely to accumulate polish or fine sanding residue during the glossing process.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-19-2019, 05:14 PM
cobalt60 cobalt60 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 98
Default

Right on - totally agreed that sinkage is different from fully open, good call.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-19-2019, 07:03 PM
fregly fregly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 825
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mercy View Post
Martin satins buff out nicely. I like the look better than gloss or satin.
Yes I really like that in between look.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-19-2019, 08:18 PM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Idaho
Posts: 7,424
Default

I'm not a finish expert, but a 2.7 mil finish is quite thin. You are very likely to burn through it down to raw wood. Danger, Will Robinson!
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=