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  #1  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:52 AM
bostosh bostosh is offline
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Default Torrified wood

how-to-do in your kitchen oven with a meat thermometer
United States Patent 8,555,521
explains it all
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  #2  
Old 03-13-2019, 01:15 PM
Shuksan Shuksan is offline
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The patent more properly describes cooking or roasting wood, not torrefaction which is heating wood in the absence of oxygen. The method described in the patent doesn't call for a reduced- or no-oxygen atmosphere which certainly makes it a simpler process to do. It's not exactly a "how to" since it gives ranges of temperature and cooking times ('between 2 and 96 hours" for example), not specific numbers.

The question is, would this approach produce wood with the same properties as torrefied wood? Maybe it would be close enough for guitar building purposes.

I didn't see any mention of a meat thermometer in the patent, btw.
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Old 03-13-2019, 03:02 PM
Condition1 Condition1 is offline
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I actually dislike the idea. Any process outside of natural (nature) process of modifying the "structure" of the wood gives me chills. It is like accelerating the aging..!?!?!? It must not be good for the wood in the long run, no matter how the vendor wants to skin this cat, it just doesn't appeal to me.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:38 PM
LouisP LouisP is offline
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Hope you donít use a microwave! [emoji6]
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Old 03-13-2019, 07:19 PM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Condition1 View Post
I actually dislike the idea. Any process outside of natural (nature) process of modifying the "structure" of the wood gives me chills. It is like accelerating the aging..!?!?!? It must not be good for the wood in the long run, no matter how the vendor wants to skin this cat, it just doesn't appeal to me.
Lot of 'torrified' guitars out there, some people do not mind them. Some people use kiln dried wood, not exactly the natural method of drying wood but we manage to make ok guitars with it.
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Old 03-13-2019, 09:03 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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One of the silliest grants of a patent ever. But they pretty much grant everything lately and leave the courts to sort it out. I guarantee it will not stand up to a legal challenge; for one reason, because hundreds or thousands of people were doing this decades earlier.

I actually thought it was some kind of parody. E.g., "Step one: obtain a piece of wood."
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Old 03-13-2019, 09:07 PM
Arch Stanton Arch Stanton is offline
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I believe some Taylors have the torrified, the 600's and one of the new grand pacific's. I think it makes the wood pretty cool looking. But, does it produce a better sound? What are the benefits, or is it just looks?
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Old 03-14-2019, 01:46 AM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Go this job in today for repair, little bit torrified old school way, why do individual parts when you can do it all in one hit

Steve

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Old 03-14-2019, 05:02 AM
Skarsaune Skarsaune is offline
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Yikes! Must have been playing some really hot licks!

Sorry, couldnít help myself. 😊
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Old 03-14-2019, 06:37 AM
Arch Stanton Arch Stanton is offline
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Nice! Little too much fun at the campfire...lol
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Old 03-14-2019, 06:38 AM
bostosh bostosh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Klepper View Post
One of the silliest grants of a patent ever. But they pretty much grant everything lately and leave the courts to sort it out. I guarantee it will not stand up to a legal challenge; for one reason, because hundreds or thousands of people were doing this decades earlier.

I actually thought it was some kind of parody. E.g., "Step one: obtain a piece of wood."
Laughing now,, Correct, they can patent any "new" idea written and drawn.

Read these guitar patents for new ideas that don't work.

P.S Our oven does not have an argon atmosphere for D.I.Y. roasting,
so i will buy the torrified necks.
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Old 03-14-2019, 06:57 AM
Condition1 Condition1 is offline
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It is just not natural, I read somewhere and will quote here - "you can't rush mother nature."
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Old 03-14-2019, 07:19 AM
redir redir is offline
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I've been baking wood for some time now, nothing new. But it's NOT torrefaction. I'm building two guitars now with torrified tops. Someone just recently on another forum summed it up perfectly when he said, it feel like you are handling driftwood. It's a very different thing. It's hard on your edge tools and very crack prone. I am using torrified bracing on these guitars too. I have some brace wood that is going on 40 years old now and it looks the same with it's deep rich yellow/orange patina but they 'feel' different. It's not really an 'aging' process imho but it does something. I'll find out soon enough how it sounds on a finished guitar.
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Old 03-14-2019, 08:42 AM
Arch Stanton Arch Stanton is offline
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I'm also a classic car guy, and when friends sit in my vehicles from the 60's and 70's, the first thing thy notice is the smell. Then i tell them "it takes at least 40 years to get that smell, and there is no other way, but time.
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