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  #1  
Old 07-28-2020, 11:28 PM
Cabarone Cabarone is offline
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Default ES 125

I recently became aware of one that might be available...anybody have/had one?
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  #2  
Old 08-01-2020, 06:17 PM
Loren Tilley Loren Tilley is offline
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I have. I read someplace that they were by some measure the most successful guitar Gibson made in the 1950s-60s or something like that. Good ones sound great and are comfortable to play. Thereís a lot of good blues & jazz in those single p-90 guitars. Sometimes you may wish you had a cutaway. Because they were on the low-ish end of the line so some have a lot of funky issues and repairs over the years, so condition is everything.
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  #3  
Old 08-02-2020, 08:50 AM
J Patrick J Patrick is offline
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...I have owned two...a 1946 and a 1958....if you can find an early mid forties model there are some significant differences...mainly the original P-90 with non adjustable solid pole pieces...a remarkable pickup that has more girth than the later versions...also a flat mahogany back and mahogany sides....makes it a bit more comfy compared to the arched back examples...
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Old 08-02-2020, 10:06 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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I've had two, both early 1960's thin body cutaway's. One had a single neck pickup, one had a pickup in the middle. They were close to Gibson's most entry level student guitar (there was an ES120, one F-hole, pickup on a pickguard, that was cheaper), along with the very similar Melody Maker, and it was mostly the trim level - unbound necks, simple binding, unremarkable woods in the laminated plates and side, single piece mahogany neck. They sold a ton of them based on the student price point. They play and sound like Gibsons, and I loved mine, wish I still had them.
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Last edited by MC5C; 08-02-2020 at 10:44 AM.
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  #5  
Old 08-02-2020, 01:16 PM
gmr gmr is offline
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I have my Fatherís 1950 ES 125. He bought it new. He passed away in Ď69. My step mother had it for a number of years, stored away. She gave her t to me somewhere when I was maybe 12....14 years old. It appeared to have not been stored in a stable environment. The plastic tuning pegs were pretty crumbly. I did not play guitar, but it had a few books in the old case, so I did what I could to learn a bit here and there. My aunt had some new tuners installed.... not much better than the crumbly ones they removed(this was in the mid-ish 70s).
It spent much of the time in the case, tucked away in closets. I finally began trying to learn to play in earnest in my late 40s. I realized the first few frets of the guitar were worn beyond re dressing. I replaced those terrible tuners but havenít had the heart to have those frets replaced. And yeah, the old P90 sounds quite nice. The old pots were a bit scratchy after years of non use, but cleaned up pretty nicely with a small bit of electrical contact cleaner and use.... no intention of replacing them. It has some minor structural issues. But the binding is amazingly good, the scratch plate still good, and the finish has a wonderful patina. Despite some finish crazing it still has a lovely gloss to it. Even still has the water slide decal of a 1950s cowgirl wrangling a little calf that he put on the upper bout right after he bought the guitar. Sorry for the long, information-less meanderings. I like mine just fine.
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Old 08-02-2020, 10:25 PM
Cabarone Cabarone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmr View Post
Sorry for the long, information-less meanderings. I like mine just fine.
No need or reason to apologize...reading your story (which I enjoyed) made me realize...guitars are like scars and tattoos; there should be a story behind every one, and usually is...thanks for sharing...
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Old 08-03-2020, 10:04 AM
Dave Hicks Dave Hicks is offline
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I've got a '67 ES125 TCD (thinline, cutaway, 2 pickups). The pickups and tuners have been changed over the years, so I don't have too much to say about them.

Three issues that I have found are: the neck is narrow, the frets are low (but wide), and it has a 14th-fret hill that damps notes up at the dusty end of the fretboard (needs a neck reset).

D.H.
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Old 08-03-2020, 12:45 PM
stevo58 stevo58 is offline
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I have a player-grade 1958 Es-125T that became a TDC over the years. Love it, itís actually my favorite guitar. Very versatile, and weighs next to nothing. Small neck, but ok.

Steven
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  #9  
Old 08-04-2020, 04:10 PM
J Patrick J Patrick is offline
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...one of my favorite ES 125 players

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  #10  
Old 08-05-2020, 07:28 AM
stevo58 stevo58 is offline
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I like that. For some reason that takes me back to my childhood. Makes me Jones again for a full depth 125.
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  #11  
Old 08-06-2020, 12:19 PM
Practiceecitcar Practiceecitcar is offline
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Yeah, the ES-125 is a wonderful guitar even though it was thought of as a student model back in its day. The videos of Martijn van Iterson show that this lowly model can really shine. I've owned a few of them but would sell my 1956 ES-125. If you're interested, drop me a PM or email. No cracks, recently had it professionally refretted. Original P-90, original bridge, tuners. The buttons are shrunken, but I have a set of vintage Kluson "no-line" tuners that are correct for this vintage. I don't see how I can insert a photo from my desktop.
Richard
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  #12  
Old 08-06-2020, 02:03 PM
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Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
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Check out the first guitar on this video:



Bob
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Old 08-06-2020, 03:21 PM
Practiceecitcar Practiceecitcar is offline
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Bob, thanks. I saw that video a few years ago but had forgotten that Vince had an ES-125. It can be versatile guitar for sure . . . not just be bop. Blues, country, and more.
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  #14  
Old 08-07-2020, 03:40 AM
robroy robroy is offline
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I have owned a 1947 Es-125 for about ten years now. It is all original except for Stew-mac replacement tuners. I am not a masterful guitar player but I love the soulful tones I get out of this guitar. In the hands of some of my more gifted buddies it sounds amazing. To me the sound is very distinct and such a welcome change from most modern guitars, both acoustic and electric. It’s funny how my tastes have changed over the years. Earlier I didn’t care so much for its acoustic sound but I’m finding it more pleasing of late. I had a 1957 Es-125T that I wish I hadn’t sold but I’m glad to have kept the ‘47 anyway. By the way, I play electric through a couple of early 60’s Gibson tube amps, a GA-5T and a GA-8 Gibsonette, also with tremolo. Both are suited so nicely for this guitar.

Last edited by robroy; 08-07-2020 at 03:46 AM.
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  #15  
Old 08-07-2020, 03:45 AM
Practiceecitcar Practiceecitcar is offline
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Robroy, that's good that you've kept the ES-125 for a long time. It does have a good tone acoustically and plugged in. I'm not offering for sale because I'm in any way displeased with it. It's a matter of finances. Richard
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