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Old 08-04-2020, 03:21 PM
MarkinLA MarkinLA is offline
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Default Speaking of C10s/fingerboard convex ?

Continuing with C10 talk, I can't decide, looking across the F board along any fret, if the board is completely flat or if there is a slight arc..Because, if there is an arc then the saddle is wrong in being not arc-ed..! See what I mean ? M
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Old 08-04-2020, 05:28 PM
AndreF AndreF is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkinLA View Post
Continuing with C10 talk, I can't decide, looking across the F board along any fret, if the board is completely flat or if there is a slight arc..Because, if there is an arc then the saddle is wrong in being not arc-ed..! See what I mean ? M
Is the guitar giving you a problem playing or intonation wise?
If not, I wouldn’t lose a lot of sleep over it.
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Old 08-04-2020, 08:33 PM
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rick-slo rick-slo is offline
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See if a ruler laid across the wood of the fretboard has any rock to it. Eyeballing it can be a bit deceptive. In any case about what Andre said.
It's a rare saddle that has a matching radius to the fretboard (generally they are flatter on the wound string side).
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Old 08-05-2020, 07:56 PM
MarkinLA MarkinLA is offline
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Well, it may be rare, but it still is serious and has levity to some of us, and am sure including world renown players, for what should be obvious reasons...Why is nut depth a legit discussion, but mine insignificant ? Making sure our strings have as close to the correct action as can be set, within the panorama of the built-in difficulties this complex instrument comes with by default, to me, anyway, is right up there. IF the board is flat the saddle should be. If not, the saddle ideally should arc with it..But I do at the same time realize it is a rare, lets just say, concern...I do know this: Rockers and jazzers are deep into that (one of which I was, and one of which I still am [Jz.]).
rick-slo Thanks for answering the legit question with a legit answer.
I believe it tapers away at the edges as opposed to a complete uninterrupted arc..I'll do the ruler thing and if questionable in any way I'll report back....
AndreF..When you find it in you heart to answer a question with an answer and not another question, the world will spin that much smoother..M
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Old 08-06-2020, 06:52 AM
FrankHS FrankHS is offline
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My C10 is slightly radiused in fingerboard. But at the saddle, right hand classical technique and proprioception prefers a flat plane across the strings, (ie, consider the mechanics of tremolo.) For musical styles where you dont need a strong RH attack, you might try an arched saddle-they are easy enough to make oneself. Consider also that action at the 12th fret is often about 4mm at low E and 3mm at high E (at least mine is.). With strings arched down there, my fretting hand would never notice the difference. Fingerboard, yes, strings, no.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkinLA View Post
Continuing with C10 talk, I can't decide,..Because, if there is an arc then the saddle is wrong in being not arc-ed..! See what I mean ? M
So far, no.
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Last edited by FrankHS; 08-06-2020 at 12:33 PM.
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Old 08-06-2020, 12:37 PM
AndreF AndreF is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkinLA View Post
Well, it may be rare, but it still is serious and has levity to some of us, and am sure including world renown players, for what should be obvious reasons...Why is nut depth a legit discussion, but mine insignificant ? Making sure our strings have as close to the correct action as can be set, within the panorama of the built-in difficulties this complex instrument comes with by default, to me, anyway, is right up there. IF the board is flat the saddle should be. If not, the saddle ideally should arc with it..But I do at the same time realize it is a rare, lets just say, concern...I do know this: Rockers and jazzers are deep into that (one of which I was, and one of which I still am [Jz.]).
rick-slo Thanks for answering the legit question with a legit answer.
I believe it tapers away at the edges as opposed to a complete uninterrupted arc..I'll do the ruler thing and if questionable in any way I'll report back....
AndreF..When you find it in you heart to answer a question with an answer and not another question, the world will spin that much smoother..M
MarkinLA:
No ill will intended. The Truth is out there! Hope you find it.
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Old 08-06-2020, 12:39 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkinLA View Post
IF the board is flat the saddle should be. If not, the saddle ideally should arc with it..
Consider an alternate perspective.

Preferences vary for if, or how much, a fingerboard should arch across its width. Once one has established that preferred geometry, flat or arched, one wants each individual string to be a preferred height above that playing surface (actually, the frets installed in that playing surface).

One approach is to achieving the preferred height of each string is to look to establishing some specific profile to the length of the saddle. Another approach is pay no attention to the profile of the saddle and, instead, simply make the saddle at each location where a string crosses it the height necessary to achieve the desired height of each individual string. Whatever profile of the saddle produces that is then the right one.

If one has a flat fingerboard, most players prefer the strings higher on the bass side and progressively lower on the treble side. The shape of the saddle will reflect that. If one has an arched fingerboard, the shape of the saddle will reflect the preferences in string height. In either case, the shape of the saddle will be whatever it needs to be to achieve the desired string heights, rather than conforming to a specific flatness or curve.
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Old 08-11-2020, 05:42 PM
MarkinLA MarkinLA is offline
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Thanks for all the replies thus far.......M
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