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  #181  
Old 01-11-2019, 08:34 AM
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Tim McKnight Tim McKnight is offline
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The bare wood, beneath the bridge, gets an application of Hot Hide Glue:









The BRW bridge is clamped in place (within 20 seconds of applying the hot hide glue):











Before the squished out glue gels (in ~30 seconds), excess glue is washed off with hot water:









The neck and fingerboard extension gets (hot hide) glued in the same time frame. After the glue dried over night I chalked the fret board:










In preparation for sanding the "differential relief" into the surface of the fret board:














Then we clean the wood dust and glue out of the fret slots:










The topside (of this picture) shows that glue has been removed from the fret slots but there is still glue to remove from the fret slots (in the bottom of the picture):






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  #182  
Old 01-11-2019, 08:59 AM
RGPGuitars RGPGuitars is offline
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Been awhile away from the forum, so I haven't followed the whole build. Amazing coco. Since red spruce is usually stiffer than Sitka, and Torrefied spruce stiffer than non torrefied (in my limited experience), did you find the top extra stiff? Sorry if this has already been answered. Russ
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  #183  
Old 01-11-2019, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by RGPGuitars View Post
Been awhile away from the forum, so I haven't followed the whole build. Amazing coco. Since red spruce is usually stiffer than Sitka, and Torrefied spruce stiffer than non torrefied (in my limited experience), did you find the top extra stiff? Sorry if this has already been answered. Russ
Hi Russ,
What I noticed most is the stiffness went up a little but the weight went down considerably more. The tone is also significantly warmer than new red spruce with a dry and very vintage tone. I sent quite a bit of my wood to be processed and I was able to weigh and measure stiffness data before and after torrefaction.
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  #184  
Old 01-11-2019, 11:56 AM
RGPGuitars RGPGuitars is offline
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Thanks, that's very interesting. I knew they were stiffer, but only wondered if they would be lighter. I saw some heavily roasted red oak, and it was quite light weight . Light , stiff, warm vintage sound, what's not to like !!
Russ
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  #185  
Old 01-11-2019, 12:02 PM
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Cutting each fret to the appropriate length:










Both ends of each fret gets nipped to clear bindings:










The underside of each nipped fret end are then filed flat to allow the fret ends to fit flush on top of the bindings:










Pressing frets in place:










Gluing frets in place:










After the glue dries we will dress the frets:
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  #186  
Old 01-11-2019, 12:55 PM
Knives&Guitars Knives&Guitars is offline
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While I will never personally make a guitar....I absolutely love learning about all of the process.
Your detailed information has been so enlightening. Thank you so much!
Can't wait to see one of your guitars at the Dr. Booth!
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  #187  
Old 01-11-2019, 03:40 PM
FLRon FLRon is offline
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Originally Posted by Tim McKnight View Post
Hi FLRon,

Thanks for following along with us on this thread. Sorry but I overlooked addressing one of your questions. Finishing wood and finishing metal are two different animals but share some similarities. When you polish metal surfaces you are progressing through sanding grits to remove scratches from the previous grit and as I am sure you know, you just can't take short cuts and skip grits or you'll be unable to remove deep scratches with too fine of grit sandpaper. In simplest of terms, you are systematically removing material from the base metal surface to achieve your final polished finish.

When working with wood we are relying on the top coat finish product to give us the final mirror gloss instead of the wood itself. Yes, the wood must be sanded to a certain smoothness before the finish is applied but its not the wood itself that shines but instead its the finish on top of that wood that gives us the gloss.

BTW, all finishes have a specific gloss rating measured on a scale of 1-100 with the higher number having the highest gloss. Just because a finish might have a flat, satin, semi-gloss or gloss "generic" rating, the OEM has also assigned each finish a corresponding gloss measurement number and you can find that number if you dig into the fine print or make a few phone calls or emails. The catalyzed urethane lacquer product we currently use has a 98 gloss rating which is one of the highest in the industry. I've never seen a 99 or 100 rating on any other products but they may exist? Many finishes are in the low 90s and some polyesters are down in the low 80s due to the higher solids content. Satin products have dulling agents added to the product to retard clarity and light refraction.

Just because a product has a 98 rating its not magically a 98 after its sprayed onto the surface of the substrate you applied it to. To achieve the highest gloss rating of any finish product the cured finish must be sanded in a similar manner in which you prepare metal. We typically sand our current finish with 600, 800, 1000, 1500 and 2000 grits before power buffing with four grits, medium, fine, very fine and hi-polish buffing compounds. Its only then that it has a 98 gloss rating.
Tim,
Iím used to seeing 2000 grit sandpaper used on crankshaft journals,but had no idea anyone used it on wood. Wow, the things Iím learning here!
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  #188  
Old 01-11-2019, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knives&Guitars View Post
While I will never personally make a guitar....I absolutely love learning about all of the process.
Your detailed information has been so enlightening. Thank you so much!
Can't wait to see one of your guitars at the Dr. Booth!
What is that old saying? ďNever say neverĒ because Iíve seen your extraordinary skills with wood and steel!






Quote:
Originally Posted by FLRon View Post
Tim,
Iím used to seeing 2000 grit sandpaper used on crankshaft journals,but had no idea anyone used it on wood. Wow, the things Iím learning here!
2000 is my last sanding grit before the body meets the buffing wheels. BTW, I leave the back of the neck shaft at 2000 grit because it leaves an excellent satin finish which your fretting hand resists sticking to. Itís a very silky and smooth surface that most of our players have come to appreciate.
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  #189  
Old 01-11-2019, 07:40 PM
RGPGuitars RGPGuitars is offline
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Love the 3 -5-9 fret markers. !! Never would have thought of it. But so classy.
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  #190  
Old 01-11-2019, 09:12 PM
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Hi Tim, looking good. As always I learn something, see things that makes me think, find I have some questions. I like your fret press but it has me wondering, how do you use it on the heel ramp. Nice selection of brass radius cauls.
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  #191  
Old 01-12-2019, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by RGPGuitars View Post
Love the 3 -5-9 fret markers. !! Never would have thought of it. But so classy.
Thanks Russ but I can't take credit for the fret marker design. It was our customer's idea and I think it ties in really well with the overall theme. As time will reveal, not only does the guitar have a slightly vintage-esque theme but also one that goes back some 2000 years ...
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  #192  
Old 01-12-2019, 07:20 AM
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Hi Tim, looking good. As always I learn something, see things that makes me think, find I have some questions. I like your fret press but it has me wondering, how do you use it on the heel ramp. Nice selection of brass radius cauls.
Sorry I didn't show that step Fred. We use a couple wooden cauls, with one resting on the heel parallel to the neck and the other is vertical, 90* to the neck. Then the bottom foot of the press can rest on these two cauls to press frets up to the body joint. Then we change to a flat bottom wooden caul, on the bottom of the press, to reach inside the sound hole, to press frets into the FB extension.

Its a technique that I learned from a set up class I took from Dave Collins and Hesh Breakstone of Ann Arbor Guitars (HIGHLY recommended BTW). I bought the brass caul set from them, while I was at the class. The brass cauls were made by Andy Birko, I think?

Dave and Hesh teach a technique which they call "Differential Relief". They claim they are able to set up guitars with equal or better accuracy than a Plek Machine. Its a tall claim but now that I've learned the method I totally agree. I am able to set up my necks with super low (but playable) action than ever before. I've had some Plek'd guitars pass through the shop and I much prefer Differential Relief now. It's a LOT of work, to get it right, but well worth it IMO. I've done it on our last dozen or so guitars and it will be our standard going forward.
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  #193  
Old 01-12-2019, 07:27 AM
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While the frets are drying we set up the bridge, if I can ever get me arm out of the sound hole?










Drilling the pin holes, through the top and bridge plate:










Sawing bridge pin string slots:










Ramping the string slots:










Filing a radius on the bottom of the pin slots, to fit each corresponding string diameter:










And a final sanding of the BRW bridge:




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  #194  
Old 01-12-2019, 09:10 AM
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Erithon Erithon is offline
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Originally Posted by Tim McKnight View Post
As time will reveal, not only does the guitar have a slightly vintage-esque theme but also one that goes back some 2000 years ...
I'm pretty sure the McKnight Facebook page already let the cat out of the bag on this one...
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  #195  
Old 01-12-2019, 09:16 AM
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Tim McKnight Tim McKnight is offline
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I'm pretty sure the McKnight Facebook page already let the cat out of the bag on this one...
Shhhhh. I'm not as fast at posting pictures as my better half is.
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