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  #1  
Old 02-11-2021, 09:15 PM
poopsidoo poopsidoo is offline
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Default Nut slot too low

Is there anyway to save a nut when someone lowers it too much? Itís the B string and itís buzzing on the first fret
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  #2  
Old 02-11-2021, 09:29 PM
endpin endpin is offline
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The baking soda/super glue trick is very popular.
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Old 02-11-2021, 09:32 PM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
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Yes, simple fix that I've done myself. Take the string out of the slot. Clean the slot well. Mask off both the fretboard and headstock where the nut contacts it. Fill the slot with regular baking soda. Drip a couple drops of thin superglue on it. Let it dry overnight. Sand smooth with the top of the nut. File a new slot at the correct depth and angle. Lube with graphite. Put the string in the slot and tune up.
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Old 02-11-2021, 11:04 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Or remove the nut, superglue a strip of paper to the bottom shape it and fit it back in, then cut the other slots that are now too high
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Old 02-12-2021, 01:18 AM
cyberdog cyberdog is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mirwa View Post
Or remove the nut, superglue a strip of paper to the bottom shape it and fit it back in, then cut the other slots that are now too high
Adhesive backed labels available from the dollar store are excellent for this purpose.
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Old 02-12-2021, 04:56 AM
phavriluk phavriluk is offline
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Default A thought

No reason to wait for thin CA to 'dry overnight'. The stuff, when it hits the baking soda, sets just about instantaneously. No drying involved. Done it myself.

I preferred to build up and resolve one slot as compared to shimming the nut and trimming all six. Personal preference.

Last edited by phavriluk; 02-12-2021 at 05:02 AM.
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  #7  
Old 02-12-2021, 07:09 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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Baking soda is a 90% permanent fix, IMO, but extremely useful and I've used it. Baking soda is a very useful accelerant for CA glue, you can mix it with water and spray it on, or dust a little and blow it off gently before applying the ultra-thin CA, and it takes the time from 15 seconds to less than a second to set. Great if 15 seconds seems like an eternity to you...

I have noticed, with two guitars lately, that I had put a lot of time into the nut slots and they developed a buzz on one or two strings, that the relief needed adjusting. Too little relief can bend the neck back just that tiny amount that the first fret buzzes out, set in .005" relief and the buzz is gone. Now, whenever I get a nut slot buzz that's usually the fix. I have been running stupid low action, nut and 12th fret, lately to accomodate some nerve damage in my left hand and fingers. They need a lot of tweaking in the wintertime.
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  #8  
Old 02-12-2021, 09:03 AM
poopsidoo poopsidoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC5C View Post
Baking soda is a 90% permanent fix, IMO, but extremely useful and I've used it. Baking soda is a very useful accelerant for CA glue, you can mix it with water and spray it on, or dust a little and blow it off gently before applying the ultra-thin CA, and it takes the time from 15 seconds to less than a second to set. Great if 15 seconds seems like an eternity to you...



I have noticed, with two guitars lately, that I had put a lot of time into the nut slots and they developed a buzz on one or two strings, that the relief needed adjusting. Too little relief can bend the neck back just that tiny amount that the first fret buzzes out, set in .005" relief and the buzz is gone. Now, whenever I get a nut slot buzz that's usually the fix. I have been running stupid low action, nut and 12th fret, lately to accomodate some nerve damage in my left hand and fingers. They need a lot of tweaking in the wintertime.


I have the Taylor graphite nut. Will the baking soda show?
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  #9  
Old 02-12-2021, 09:55 AM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
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I deepen the slot with a saw or file and glue in a sliver of bone with super glue. Then recut the slot.
I have never done it to a graphite nut. In that case, I would probably shim the bottom and deepen the other slots to match.
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  #10  
Old 02-12-2021, 10:52 AM
poopsidoo poopsidoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
I deepen the slot with a saw or file and glue in a sliver of bone with super glue. Then recut the slot.
I have never done it to a graphite nut. In that case, I would probably shim the bottom and deepen the other slots to match.


Oh I hate to do that. Might as well replace the nut. Iíd take it to my repair dude. But like most of us music types, I was looking for the easy way out.
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  #11  
Old 02-12-2021, 11:18 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poopsidoo View Post
I have the Taylor graphite nut. Will the baking soda show?
If the nut is white, no, it won't show. Effectively the glue/soda is only coating the bottom of the nut slot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by poopsidoo View Post
Might as well replace the nut.
Replacing a nut is around $50 to $100 depending upon who does it. Shimming and deepening nut slots is half, or less, of that. Filling one slot and recutting is less than that. Effectively there will be no identifiable difference in the end result. What will be different is how much you pay to achieve that same result. It's your money, your guitar: you choose.
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Old 02-12-2021, 03:15 PM
Mirosh Mirosh is offline
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Is baking soda better than bone dust for this? Would it make a difference if the nut were plastic, tusq, bone, etc?
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  #13  
Old 02-12-2021, 04:02 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mirosh View Post
Is baking soda better than bone dust for this? Would it make a difference if the nut were plastic, tusq, bone, etc?
I used all of those combinations and found no practical difference.
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  #14  
Old 02-13-2021, 06:51 PM
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rampix rampix is offline
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Just curious gents, has anyone tried a UV cure epoxy? My dentist uses it and Iíve used in an industrial application. My wife uses it while tying flies.

It strikes me as being a possible solution. Again, Iím just curious as there are already proven methods being discussed.
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  #15  
Old 02-14-2021, 09:33 AM
redir redir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mirwa View Post
Or remove the nut, superglue a strip of paper to the bottom shape it and fit it back in, then cut the other slots that are now too high
This has become my favorite shim method. The paper turns rock hard when the CA cures and it's hidden well on a white bone nut or even plastic.
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