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  #31  
Old 02-08-2012, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by dlowry View Post
Hi Mark,
I take it the lattice bracing is for the steel-string top, as your schematic for the nylon-string shows a fan-brace pattern. Or is this your back bracing?

Drew
Hi Drew,

This is the lattice for the backs of both guitars. I am going more traditional with the fan bracing on the nylon crossover and the steel string will have lattice bracing combined with an X-brace.

Steve,

Thanks for your comments!

Mark
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  #32  
Old 02-09-2012, 03:26 PM
kirkham13 kirkham13 is offline
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Two thoughts. One, the splitting froe would make a great throwing/survival knife. And two, I wonder if koa trees could be exported to California and other Mediterranean regions, and similar to the eucalyptus, proliferate at a rapid rate....
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  #33  
Old 02-09-2012, 04:31 PM
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Two thoughts. One, the splitting froe would make a great throwing/survival knife. And two, I wonder if koa trees could be exported to California and other Mediterranean regions, and similar to the eucalyptus, proliferate at a rapid rate....
LOL I'm sure you could split more than just wood with one of these froes.
They are usually made pretty thick and tough so you can smack them with a hammer or mallet, so they hold up well.

The Koa trees are indigenous only to Hawaii. I think the volcanic soil might be a requirement. They grow mostly on Maui and the big island, Hawaii. There are differences in the trees between the two islands with the big island tending to have the wood with the darker chocolate colors.
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  #34  
Old 02-09-2012, 04:55 PM
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Default Designing a Headstock

I am designing this crossover as I go here. I've got to start early on the headstock to be sure I get the bugs out before I actually build the neck for this guitar. Of course, I want an open headstock but my usual steel string head is sort of a trademark for my line. If your not familiar with what I do on steel strings here is a pic of a recent BRW one;



Here is a mock-up I'm working on. It doesn't have any of the laminates, I'm just working the design and string clearances etc. I think it still looks like a Hatcher headstock. Please give me your feedback!



I really like these Knilling Perfection planetary tuners. They have a 4 to 1 turn ratio and work great. They are also very light, making for a well balanced guitar. I first saw them on that great looking Batson crossover and thought about all the possibilities in head designs.
So again, please tell me what you think of the mock up.

Thanks!
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  #35  
Old 02-14-2012, 11:35 AM
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Hi Mark,

I'm a huge admirer of your work, and really appreciate the time you take to document your great builds. There's a beautiful elegance to your designs and executions that I love (and your photography too!).

I really like your slothead design----it definitely looks Hatcher-esque. Two questions about it for you. One of the things I love about your steel string paddlehead design is how you've designed it so there's a straight shot from each nut slot to each tuner post for each string. Seems like that would support the best seating possible for each string in each slot, and you really don't see that in many steel string designs. Can you achieve close to the same thing with your slothead design?

The other thing I'm curious about is whether or not you'll be able to use your laminated neck design with the slothead. I can't tell if there's enough mahogany there to keep the laminates from showing on the insides of each slot.

Thanks again for sharing your beautiful builds and photography!

John
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  #36  
Old 02-14-2012, 12:35 PM
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Interesting headstock!

It reminds me quite a bit of the ancient lyres.


or the "lyre guitar" shapes...


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  #37  
Old 02-14-2012, 04:02 PM
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Hi Mark,

Two questions about it for you. One of the things I love about your steel string paddlehead design is how you've designed it so there's a straight shot from each nut slot to each tuner post for each string. Seems like that would support the best seating possible for each string in each slot, and you really don't see that in many steel string designs. Can you achieve close to the same thing with your slothead design?

The other thing I'm curious about is whether or not you'll be able to use your laminated neck design with the slothead. I can't tell if there's enough mahogany there to keep the laminates from showing on the insides of each slot.

Thanks again for sharing your beautiful builds and photography!

John
Hi John,

I see your new on the forum and you choose me for your first post. Welcome to the forum and thank-you very much for your compliments.
To answer your questions; Yes, this will get a much straighter run of the string over the nut than usual. I think it reduces stress on the string at the nut and makes tuning a little smoother.
I'm not sure about the neck laminate. I use the laminate on the steel string neck because it adds strength and reduces warps. With nylon strings and the reduced string tension a laminate would really be there more for cosmetic effect (not that that's a bad thing) I haven't even really decided if I'm putting in a truss rod. Although I've left room in the design for a truss rod cover. I'm leaning toward yes on the laminate and yes on the truss rod. If I already had a buyer I suppose I'd leave it up to them!

Again thanks for your kind words
Mark
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  #38  
Old 02-14-2012, 04:08 PM
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Interesting headstock!

It reminds me quite a bit of the ancient lyres.
or the "lyre guitar" shapes...
Thanks for posting the pictures Kevin. I wasn't purposely copying those lines but there really is a similarity. Thanks for pointing that out!

Mark
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  #39  
Old 02-14-2012, 05:21 PM
Red_Label Red_Label is offline
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Wow! What a neat thread! I am fascinated with the beauty of your work. That pic of the steel string headstock from the side in particular. The curves are so perfect. And the beauty of those woods is almost "edible"! Looks like fine chocolate!

Honestly, I dunno how guys like you ever make any kind of a living out of guitar building. Were it me, I'd have trouble letting go of something so beautiful that I put all of my sweat into. I'd want to keep 'em all! But I'm sure it brings you great joy to hear others make beautiful music on your instruments.
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  #40  
Old 02-14-2012, 06:55 PM
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I really like the guitars, but the crossover's headstock just doesn't sit too well with me. If your using the planetary tuners, why not just make it a solid headstock?
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  #41  
Old 02-15-2012, 04:44 AM
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Originally Posted by henderson is go View Post
I really like the guitars, but the crossover's headstock just doesn't sit too well with me. If your using the planetary tuners, why not just make it a solid headstock?
Hi Brian,

Thanks for your feedback. These planetry tuners aren't like what you might see on a banjo. They are set up for two points of contact on the headstock.
I really like the "open hand" look of them, but they are different and will not appeal to everyone.

Again, thanks for your comments
Mark
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  #42  
Old 02-15-2012, 04:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Red_Label View Post
Wow! What a neat thread! I am fascinated with the beauty of your work. That pic of the steel string headstock from the side in particular. The curves are so perfect. And the beauty of those woods is almost "edible"! Looks like fine chocolate!

Honestly, I dunno how guys like you ever make any kind of a living out of guitar building. Were it me, I'd have trouble letting go of something so beautiful that I put all of my sweat into. I'd want to keep 'em all! But I'm sure it brings you great joy to hear others make beautiful music on your instruments.
Thanks Red,

Your right, I think most builders really do love the guitars they build. Speaking for myself, I have to say I'm a fickle lover though, because I always am most in love with the next one I'm building!

Mark
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  #43  
Old 02-19-2012, 03:50 PM
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Here are some more pictures. I'm making both the backs pretty much identically







Thanks!
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  #44  
Old 02-20-2012, 12:06 AM
BEJ BEJ is offline
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Mark, some fantastic work on that back bracing! Being new to guitar making I don't know too much about how bracing structure effects sound but I'm not sure the straight lines, squares feel right to me on a guitar, seems like they were meant more for curved lines.

Anyway that aside, your craftsmanship on your bracing system shows a level of talent to be envied, and respected, and real nice to look at! And another way to "make a guitar" that anyone whether a newbe or an old hand can study and think about and possibly learn something from.

Bruce,
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  #45  
Old 02-20-2012, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by BEJ View Post
Mark, some fantastic work on that back bracing! Being new to guitar making I don't know too much about how bracing structure effects sound but I'm not sure the straight lines, squares feel right to me on a guitar, seems like they were meant more for curved lines.

Bruce,
Thanks for commenting Bruce. One of the drawbacks of these pictures is the back appears really built up. In fact, one of the typical issues inexperienced builders have with lattice bracing is overbuilding. What you can't see in the picture is how light this back is. Compared to a more traditionally built thicknessed and ladder braced back, this back is probably 30% lighter! It has much more uniform stiffness and when finished this active style back is matched to the top to give a lot more "surround" sound for the player.
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