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Old 07-24-2019, 10:06 PM
Lamtaylor999 Lamtaylor999 is offline
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Default About gorilla wood glue and potential savings!

Hello! I am pondering buying a used 814ce first edition Taylor guitar. It is being sent to my local GC so that I may inspect it first hand. If I were to purchase this one I would potentially be saving 600-700 dollars.

I was told by the guitar tech that the bridge was glued using either titebond or gorilla wood glue and that you can tell that it was re-glued (not sure yet if it was "sloppy").

Now I live near the Taylor factory, so I could drop the guitar off in person and have the bridge reglued, my problem is, if gorilla wood glue was used, is it bad for acoustic instruments? Does the glue cause any damage to the finish if left to dry on top?
They gave me an evaluation of about 80 dollars and if I were to do a refresh/maintenance it’s another 95 dollars which I do not mind.

Is this a good deal or should i spend the extra 300-400 on a "like new" condition version of the guitar? Thanks for the advice guys!

Last edited by Lamtaylor999; 07-25-2019 at 12:05 AM.
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Old 07-24-2019, 10:34 PM
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton is online now
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If the work was done carefully and professionally, the fact that a yellow glue like Titebond, Elmer’s Wood Glue or a PVA glue like Gorilla Wood Glue was used is not a worry. The fact that it’s possible to discern that a bridge has been reglued or replaced doesn’t automatically suggest (much less prove) that the work was executed poorly; those of us who have been around a lot of acoustic guitars can usually spot when that work’s been done. The indicators are usually quite subtle, and you have to know what you’re looking at to even notice that work on the bridge has ever been needed.

To me that’s not an indication that a guitar is problematic - just the opposite. To me that indicates that whoever previously owned the guitar was alert and when a problem developed, they were smart enough to get it corrected.

Over the years this is a problem that’s arisen with instruments I’ve owned probably three or four times. In each instance I’ve immediately had the problem corrected, and in NONE of those cases has the bridge ever needed to be worked on again. In my experience, once a bridge gets fixed, it stays fixed.

Hope this helps.


Wade Hampton Miller
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Old 07-24-2019, 10:43 PM
ChrisE ChrisE is offline
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Default About gorilla wood glue and potential savings!

Iím pretty sure my grandpaís HD-28 had its bridge glued with Gorilla glue or something similar at one point.

2 problemsóthe glue didnít hold (editóthe original repair was poorly done) and it was a mess to repair. Here are some pics:


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Last edited by ChrisE; 07-25-2019 at 05:25 AM.
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Old 07-24-2019, 10:59 PM
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton is online now
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It all depends on how well and how cleanly the original work was done. There are different kinds of Gorilla brand glue; perhaps the one used on the horror story of a botched repair job that you showed us was the wrong kind.

Obviously, those photos don't inspire much confidence. But that almost certainly isn't what the guitar in question looks like, or the store wouldn't be trying to sell it.


whm
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Old 07-24-2019, 11:11 PM
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton is online now
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Okay, I just went back and reread your post. You wrote:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisE View Post
Iím pretty sure my grandpaís HD-28 had its bridge glued with Gorilla glue or something similar at one point.
Yes, but you don't know what the glue in question happens to be. That "...or something similar" you wrote leaves an immense amount of wiggle room for speculation, which is really all that you have.

What you know is that somebody botched that repair on your grandfather's Martin. Fair enough. That sucks.

What you don't know is what glue was used, and from your post it seems that you don't know who did the work, either, whether it was an actual guitar repair tech who knew what he was doing or some shade tree mechanic friend of your grandfather's who told him:

"Oh, hell, Floyd, I can fix that for you...."

I don't mean to be overbearing here, but from my perspective it seems as though you're telling the OP to run away from this possible transaction without knowing the particulars of either your grandfather's guitar repair or the work that was done on the guitar he's looking at.


Wade Hampton Miller
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Old 07-24-2019, 11:46 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamtaylor999 View Post

I was told by the guitar tech that the bridge was glued using either titebond or gorilla wood glue and that you can tell that it was re-glued (not sure yet if it was "sloppy").

Now I live near the Taylor factory, so I could drop the guitar off in person and have the bridge reglued, my problem is, if gorilla wood glue was used, is it bad for acoustic instruments? Does the glue cause any damage to the finish if left to dry on top?

Is this a good deal or should i spend the extra 300-400 on a "like new" condition version of the guitar? Thanks for the advice guys!
The original Gorilla Glue is a urethane glue that expands after application. It is likely very difficult to remove from finished surfaces once dry. Itís original ad campaign stated that it was ďThe toughest glue on planet EarthĒ, though much later test results by Fine Woodworking showed that it was not stronger than other common wood glued, including original Titebond - it was somewhat weaker. I have not used Gorilla Glue on any instrument application nor do I know of any other maker/repairer who does.

How much will Taylor charge to remove and re-glue a bridge? Without that information you canít estimate if buying this instrument is a savings.

In A professionally done bridge re-glue, that it was the-glued should be undetectable. Upon seeing it, youíll have to decide if the quality of the work bothers you or that the work devalues the instrument.
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Old 07-25-2019, 12:07 AM
Lamtaylor999 Lamtaylor999 is offline
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Yes the guitar was done with gorilla wood glue at worst case scenario. Taylor gave me an estimate of about 80 for reglue bridge and 95 for maintenance and adjustments necessary.

I just Hope they could make the reglue like new because it would really bother me if I could tell if it was reglued.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:56 AM
rmp rmp is offline
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so you mention this...

Is this a good deal or should i spend the extra 300-400 on a "like new" condition version of the guitar? Thanks for the advice guys!


then this..

I just Hope they could make the reglue like new because it would really bother me if I could tell if it was reglued



it would bother me too, so much so that given the plan to hold onto the guitar for many years, the extra cash over the life of me owing it... I'd drop the extra $ and move on..
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Old 07-25-2019, 04:35 AM
ChrisE ChrisE is offline
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Default About gorilla wood glue and potential savings!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wade Hampton View Post
Okay, I just went back and reread your post. You wrote:







Yes, but you don't know what the glue in question happens to be. That "...or something similar" you wrote leaves an immense amount of wiggle room for speculation, which is really all that you have.



What you know is that somebody botched that repair on your grandfather's Martin. Fair enough. That sucks.



What you don't know is what glue was used, and from your post it seems that you don't know who did the work, either, whether it was an actual guitar repair tech who knew what he was doing or some shade tree mechanic friend of your grandfather's who told him:



"Oh, hell, Floyd, I can fix that for you...."



I don't mean to be overbearing here, but from my perspective it seems as though you're telling the OP to run away from this possible transaction without knowing the particulars of either your grandfather's guitar repair or the work that was done on the guitar he's looking at.





Wade Hampton Miller


Actually the opposite. The point of my post was to show my own personal example of a botched repair and show that even a botched repair can be fixed.

OPócheck the guitar out in person and donít let the bridge reglue issue stand in the way of getting a great guitar. If it was done properly it should never be a problem. If it was done poorly (like my grandpaís HD-28) it can be fixed.

My apologies if I led you to believe otherwise.
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Last edited by ChrisE; 07-25-2019 at 04:46 AM.
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Old 07-25-2019, 09:19 AM
Osage Osage is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamtaylor999 View Post
Yes the guitar was done with gorilla wood glue at worst case scenario. Taylor gave me an estimate of about 80 for reglue bridge and 95 for maintenance and adjustments necessary.

I just Hope they could make the reglue like new because it would really bother me if I could tell if it was reglued.

I play mainly old guitars so a re-glued bridge doesn't bother me in the slightest. Bridges can come up on even the best guitars under the best circumstances. In most cases, you can tell if a bridge has been off of a guitar. You may have to look close but you can tell. In a case like yours, if it's coming off and being re-glued for the second time, I would be surprised if you wouldn't see at least a small trace of the work. Gorilla glue expands and is not typically used on guitars so that makes me question the skill level of the person who originally re-attached it.

I guess what I'm saying is I wouldn't be at all surprised if you can tell if it's been reglued and if it's something that is going to bother you, you may want to think about a different guitar.
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Old 07-25-2019, 10:30 AM
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vindibona1 vindibona1 is offline
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I cannot tell you about gluing a bridge with gorilla glue. The question that I'd want to know is if the glue used would be easy to release with standard methods so it could be reglued professionally.

I used Gorilla wood glue to reglue a top seam on my '81 Epiphone. It didn't affect the sound, has held well and I did a very neat job so nobody would be able to tell anyway. But a bridge? That's a major sound component of the guitar.
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Old 07-25-2019, 11:05 AM
Edgar Poe Edgar Poe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisE View Post
Iím pretty sure my grandpaís HD-28 had its bridge glued with Gorilla glue or something similar at one point.

2 problemsóthe glue didnít hold (editóthe original repair was poorly done) and it was a mess to repair. Here are some pics:


Almost looks like contact cement.

Ed
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Old 07-25-2019, 11:11 AM
ChrisE ChrisE is offline
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I'm not exactly sure what it was, but my point was that even a messed up glue job can be fixed.
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Old 07-25-2019, 12:05 PM
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Polyurethane glues are great when working with construction lumber - they like the damp and expand to help fill sloppy joints. But none of that should apply when working on a good instrument.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:45 PM
musicman1951 musicman1951 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamtaylor999 View Post
Yes the guitar was done with gorilla wood glue at worst case scenario. Taylor gave me an estimate of about 80 for reglue bridge and 95 for maintenance and adjustments necessary.

I just Hope they could make the reglue like new because it would really bother me if I could tell if it was reglued.
If it would really bother me I wouldn't risk it - but it's your wallet.
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