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  #1  
Old 06-24-2018, 05:25 PM
jonbutcheraxis jonbutcheraxis is offline
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Default Ramirez guitar labels

Can anyone explain the difference between these two Ramirez guitar labels, both in 'Student' model guitars, both made in the 70's ?




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  #2  
Old 06-24-2018, 05:55 PM
Ct20 Ct20 is offline
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Default Ramirez

See below response.

Last edited by Ct20; 06-25-2018 at 05:32 AM. Reason: Better information provided
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Old 06-24-2018, 06:56 PM
Dragonnak Dragonnak is offline
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Default Labels

Well one is in white and the other is Blue.
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Old 06-24-2018, 08:00 PM
smwink smwink is offline
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According to info that used to be on the Ramirez site (you'll have to find a cached version now), both labels were introduced around 1957.

The round labels were the low end student and "tourist" models, outsourced to a number of shops. "Rondalla" refers to a group of plucked string musicians, often associated with folk or street music. To add to the confusion, Ramirez still occasionally uses this label, the George Harrison tribute model being a recent example. In that case, the label is representative of what was in Harrison's inexpensive Ramirez back in the day.

The rectangular Guitarras de Estudio also indicates an outsourced factory/workshop guitar, but generally higher quality than the round label. These were produced by Alhambra, Raimundo, and a few other well-known workshops.
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Old 06-24-2018, 09:09 PM
jonbutcheraxis jonbutcheraxis is offline
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Thank you, this is just the kind of info I'd hoped would surface. And your comments are completely born out by the guitars themselves. Are the present day Ramirez guitars like the 2CWE any good ? And Alhambra and Raimundo branded guitars ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by smwink View Post
According to info that used to be on the Ramirez site (you'll have to find a cached version now), both labels were introduced around 1957.

The round labels were the low end student and "tourist" models, outsourced to a number of shops. "Rondalla" refers to a group of plucked string musicians, often associated with folk or street music. To add to the confusion, Ramirez still occasionally uses this label, the George Harrison tribute model being a recent example. In that case, the label is representative of what was in Harrison's inexpensive Ramirez back in the day.

The rectangular Guitarras de Estudio also indicates an outsourced factory/workshop guitar, but generally higher quality than the round label. These were produced by Alhambra, Raimundo, and a few other well-known workshops.

Last edited by jonbutcheraxis; 06-24-2018 at 10:10 PM.
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Old 06-24-2018, 10:57 PM
jrethorst jrethorst is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smwink View Post
According to info that used to be on the Ramirez site (you'll have to find a cached version now),
As info, the Internet Archive's Wayback machine caches the entire web. https://archive.org/web/
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Old 06-25-2018, 04:45 AM
smwink smwink is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonbutcheraxis View Post
Thank you, this is just the kind of info I'd hoped would surface. And your comments are completely born out by the guitars themselves. Are the present day Ramirez guitars like the 2CWE any good ? And Alhambra and Raimundo branded guitars ?
It's all pretty subjective, but there is nothing wrong with any of the guitars you mentioned. If you're looking at the $1000 range, my personal opinion is that you'll get more for your dollar if you don't worry too much about the name brand. Ramirez still seems to fetch a premium based on name recognition, largely associated with Segovia's use of their guitars during a large portion of his later career. There is an overall "made in Spain" mystique that persists, but there are fine classical guitars being built worldwide these days. Kenny Hill brought people's attention to the Paracho, MX builders, though he has shifted to China, as has Cordoba for some of their models.

For $1000, you will likely get a Ramirez student model with a solid top and laminated back/sides, built in one of their contracted factories. For that price range, you can also get something like the Alhambra 7P, all solid woods. You could also get a Marlon Navarro with all solid woods. My opinion again is that the Navarro will be more responsive, with a lighter build and finish, than either of the other two. There are also plenty of vintage Japanese guitars in this price range that were built in the style of the Ramirez 1A if that's the look and feel you're after.
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