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  #1  
Old 02-06-2021, 07:49 AM
RustyMcdangles RustyMcdangles is offline
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Question Is this repairable/worth repairing?

https://ibb.co/p0sHhLF

Crack in the neck, new guitar on a fender redondo player. What is involved with a repair and how much does it affect the playability? If I can get it cheap enough, should I? Thanks
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  #2  
Old 02-06-2021, 08:01 AM
edcmat-l1 edcmat-l1 is offline
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My question would be, why would you want it?
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Old 02-06-2021, 08:03 AM
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fazool fazool is offline
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that looks clean and can be easily repaired.

If its a cheap guitar you can simply glue it back together.

Because the stress is all in tension, CA glue is quite suitable for that. A good quality wood glue like Titebond-II would work as well, but is a little thicker so harder to get into the crack.

remove the strings, do not mess with the wood or you can ruin the mating joint. Blow out flecks with an air car, check the joint for a perfect seal. lightly unbend and fibers that are not lying properly with a pick tool.

apply glue and clamp shut.

Easy fix and totally reliable.
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Old 02-06-2021, 09:27 AM
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Mr. Jelly Mr. Jelly is offline
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It's allot like having an old worn out car that needs repaired. At some point you have to ask the question is the money better spent on another car or repairing the old one, again. It might not cost that much to repair. Most real luthier's won't do a hack job on it. You can ask for a estimate.
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Old 02-06-2021, 09:27 AM
redir redir is offline
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Yes. That is a very easy repair. I would recommend using Titebond I. It looks open enough to me to be able to work the glue in. If not then you can dilute the TB to 10% and it will flow in there nicely. Clean all the squeeze out with a wet cloth and clamp it up with cushioned cauls.
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Old 02-06-2021, 09:30 AM
Zigeuner Zigeuner is offline
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Default Run Away.

I'd avoid a guitar with such damage. Even though a good repair might be made, any further mishandling could cause a glue joint to fail.

I'd keep looking. JMHO, YMMV.
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Old 02-06-2021, 09:37 AM
RustyMcdangles RustyMcdangles is offline
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Just trying to get a general consensus, itís a brand new guitar, I can likely pick it up for next to nothing, so if a repair can be made, I might try to pick it up as a beater to have around or for the daughter.
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Old 02-06-2021, 03:37 PM
phavriluk phavriluk is online now
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Default question for OP

What's the guitar? Is the intent to glue the break in place? One trick I've seen (a luthier's watch-this on a guitar I bought to repair) was to put glue on a feeler gauge and insert the tool as deep into the crack as possible. Inject glue with a syringe, maybe. Pallet knife, too. Whatever can get the glue into the crack.

If OP can get the guitar for peanuts, I don't see a downside. Ten minutes, some glue, clamp it up and check in the morning.
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Old 02-06-2021, 05:42 PM
Dave Abrahamson Dave Abrahamson is offline
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If you can get it for next to nothing what do have to lose? Next to nothing?😉😁
As already said, easy fix. Glue it, clamp it and play it
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  #10  
Old 02-06-2021, 06:26 PM
RonMay RonMay is offline
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Default worth reparing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyMcdangles View Post
https://ibb.co/p0sHhLF

Crack in the neck, new guitar on a fender redondo player. What is involved with a repair, and how much does it affect the playability? If I can get it cheap enough, should I? Thanks
In my book, any instrument is worth repairing. It all depends on how deep your pockets are.

For nothing else but to give it to someone to learn how to play is well worth it.
You might be giving it to the next Jimmy H.

Use an artist brush and let some water flow in. Then some TiteBond original and it will help the glue to wick down deep into the crack, clamp for two or three days and viola, good as new.

This is an easy simple repair and will play as if nothing was ever wrong with it.
Enjoy, amigo.

Ron
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Old 02-06-2021, 06:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zigeuner View Post
...ven though a good repair might be made, any further mishandling could cause a glue joint to fail. ...
in almost all cases the glue joint will be stronger than the wood - usually the wood will break before a glue joint, unless it gets wet or hot.
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Old 02-08-2021, 09:58 AM
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Titebond I and clamp, make sure it is aligned with the bridge. The other question is if there is damage in the box?
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Old 02-09-2021, 01:42 PM
RustyMcdangles RustyMcdangles is offline
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Thanks for the help guys. As far as I know there isnít internal damage. Iíll definitely look, Iím not sure the crack goes all the way across both sides. Do you recommend squirting it in the crack, clamping it and wiping excess? How long does this stuff typically take to dry?
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Old 02-09-2021, 02:40 PM
ArchtopLover ArchtopLover is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyMcdangles View Post
Thanks for the help guys. As far as I know there isn’t internal damage. I’ll definitely look, I’m not sure the crack goes all the way across both sides. Do you recommend squirting it in the crack, clamping it and wiping excess? How long does this stuff typically take to dry?
If you do decide to purchase and repair this guitar, do NOT use a pallet knife to poke and jam glue (Titebond original recommended, do not use CA glue, wrong application) into the crack. This repair tool method is used for smooth parallel surfaces, like a top and brace joint only.

When the crack joint is irregular and splintered, if you were to use a flat bladed tool, you will tear, break loose and distort the wood grain, causing the crack to be uneven and no longer be a clean and symmetrical mating surface.

In this situation, you want to use an very old violin repair technique, which is a small, maybe 1" diameter or so, plastic suction cup to apply the glue and pressure squeeze the glue into the neck heel crack.

Begin by taking the strings off. Then apply a line of glue to the crack, while applying a moderate amount of force, use the suction cup like a piston pump, and push the glue into the crack with a pumping motion. This trick works wonders. Once you have glue squeeze-out appearing around the crack, gently apply pressure to the neck to lever the crack open, slightly and closed slightly, so as to squish the glue into the joint by compressing the liquid, and then releasing the pressure. Do this a few times to evenly distribute the glue (you can't do this with CA glue, this is why it is inappropriate in this situation).

Once this is done, clean up any squeeze out with a damp cloth.

Then, it's time to clamp up. My advise here is to have a clamping scheme devised first, before you apply any glue; and of course have access to as many clamps, cauls, and protective pads, like pieces of leather and sheet cork as you can get your hands on.

I've done a few repairs like this, so I am familiar with the process, and this is one of the easier types of repair to make, since the parts have not completely separated yet .
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  #15  
Old 02-10-2021, 07:50 PM
RustyMcdangles RustyMcdangles is offline
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This was very thorough, I appreciate this! Thank you
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