The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > General Acoustic Guitar Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 10-21-2019, 12:40 PM
richard1 richard1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 727
Default Sanding Gibson J45 neck

I can't remember whether it was here or on the Gibson forum that I read about this, but I am thinking of sanding the neck to arrive at a satin type finish.
I recall that the guy that described the process, had said that he came across a layer of brown paint under the finish which he had to scrape off in order to expose the wood beneath.
Could this be right? It's not that I doubt the guys honesty, but really? Do Gibson actually use brown paint beneath the finish on the neck?
I suppose it's not that strange when you think about it. The sunburst finish is painted on after all. But I'm not sure I want the aggravation of removing paint from the neck.
Has anyone here any experience of doing this modification?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-21-2019, 12:45 PM
J-Doug J-Doug is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 4,132
Default

If you absolutely must do this put away the sandpaper and tools etc. and just buff lightly with 0000 steel wool. It will turn satin quickly and is reversible if you don't overdo it.
__________________

Doug, guitar player of variable quality for 34 years

2003 Martin 000-18MC ✩ 2008 Martin 000-28VS ✩ 2012 Gibson J-45 Standard ✩ 2015 Gibson 1928 L-1 Blues Tribute ✩ 2015 Gibson 1932 L-00 Vintage ✩ Fender Acoustic SFX ✩ Baggs ParaDI

My recordings

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-21-2019, 02:01 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 6,586
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by richard1 View Post
...sanding the neck to arrive at a satin type finish.
Be clear about what result you are trying to achieve. Do you want to remove the finish to expose bare wood? (From your description of it, that is what the person who removed "paint" did.) Do you want to retain the finish - and any color - by dulling the finish to a satin sheen?

If you want a satin sheen, but don't want the finish removed, light rubbing with 0000 steel wool is one way to accomplish that. Another is to rub with a medium coarseness rubbing compound on a paper towel or clean rag.

If you remove the finish from the neck, you will significantly devalue the resale value of the instrument, if that matters to you.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-21-2019, 04:37 PM
ChrisE ChrisE is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 1,852
Default

Do what they said with the steel wool. Or you can use a Scotch Brite pad. The white ones are very fine but the grey is more coarse. It's probably safer to start with the white.

I do this a couple of times a year with my D-18 and my Taylor 314ce. They were both satin necks when I got them, but after playing for a while, they get all shiny. Rough them up a little with the steel wool or Scotch Brite and if you don't like it, don't worry--it will gloss up again from playing.
__________________
2015 Martin D-18
1982 Martin HD-28
2013 Taylor 314ce
2004 Fender Telecaster MIM
2010 Martin DCX1RE
1984 Sigma DM3
Fender Mustang III v2
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-21-2019, 07:53 PM
mercy mercy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Inland Empire, So California
Posts: 4,266
Default

I cant imagine your doing that to a great guitar like you have.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-21-2019, 08:25 PM
rokdog49 rokdog49 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 9,532
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mercy View Post
I cant imagine your doing that to a great guitar like you have.
Me either, but...to each his own.
__________________
Martin D18
Gibson J45
Gibson J15
Eastman E10 00 SS Sunburst
And a Copperburst Tele

Location: Somewhere in a small town in North Central Ohio.
“If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed man.” It’s just me looking for my pick.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-21-2019, 09:19 PM
jed1894 jed1894 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 703
Default

I had to do this with my son’s Les Paul. He has moist hands which made playing very hard. I used the green scotch guard and magic eraser. I taped off each end so I would a nice leading edge. The magic eraser will work along but it takes longer.

Jed
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-22-2019, 12:54 AM
tippy5 tippy5 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: So Cal
Posts: 2,680
Default

If you aren't worried about resale go for the 0000 steel wool. Painter's Tape off a V or C line at the top. Tape around the heel. Gibson Lacquer is sticky. I say go for it but don't take all of the factory coats off down to the wood. let us know how it comes out. There are two Gibson forums check into them.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-22-2019, 04:44 AM
richard1 richard1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 727
Default

OK guys thanks for all the info.
I was thinking of going to bare wood and then applying some kind of wax to protect the wood, but on second thoughts, I'll probably go the less drastic route and just take off the sticky surface with either Scotchbrite or a fine steel wool. I'll try that first.
Resale value does not concern me. This is a guitar I will not be parting with. I just want an easier playing neck.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-22-2019, 06:51 AM
rmp rmp is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,065
Default

If this is a newer one, once the finish cures, it wont always be sticky like it is when the finish is still soft.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-22-2019, 07:16 AM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,662
Default

In bluegrass we call it a "speed neck." All orchestral stringed instruments have bare unfinished necks. I grew up playing violin so I'm used to and prefer a bare wood feel. Glossy finish gets sticky. I've speed necked all my "keeper" instruments, and my custom instruments I've ordered bare from the builder.

As said the 0000 steel wood will de-gloss without stripping any color/stain. Bare necks can stand a very light coat of tung or linseed oil applied then buffed out every few years.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-22-2019, 07:23 AM
rokdog49 rokdog49 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 9,532
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandobart View Post
In bluegrass we call it a "speed neck." All orchestral stringed instruments have bare unfinished necks. I grew up playing violin so I'm used to and prefer a bare wood feel. Glossy finish gets sticky. I've speed necked all my "keeper" instruments, and my custom instruments I've ordered bare from the builder.

As said the 0000 steel wood will de-gloss without stripping any color/stain. Bare necks can stand a very light coat of tung or linseed oil applied then buffed out every few years.
A glossy finished neck can be cleaned quite easily. Naphtha works very well and then if necessary, a tried and true product like GHS Guitar Gloss will add slickness without affecting the finish.
I used to think I wouldn’t like a glossy neck for the “stickiness” issue.
I have since found that it hasn’t been an issue at all.
__________________
Martin D18
Gibson J45
Gibson J15
Eastman E10 00 SS Sunburst
And a Copperburst Tele

Location: Somewhere in a small town in North Central Ohio.
“If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed man.” It’s just me looking for my pick.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-22-2019, 08:05 AM
hat hat is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,183
Default

I always try to follow the 'less is more' philosophy when working on anything. the least I can do to get it done, the better it seems to work out. In that vein, I have a piece of old rough flannel shirt that I use as a wipe for the neck. When I change strings, I'll take that flannel, and vigorously rub the back of the neck. It helps to clean the neck, and also helps in adding 'slip' tot he finish.
__________________
______________
---Tom H ---
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-22-2019, 04:59 PM
51 Relic 51 Relic is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Whippingham Isle of Wight England
Posts: 1,283
Default Sanding Gibson J45 neck

Sorry , but why do all this to a lovely guitar . That's just my view
__________________
Martin OODB JT
Gibson J45
Yamaha LLTA
Yamaha SLG200S
Yamaha NTX1200R
Taylor GSMiniE Rosewood
Joe Brown Uke
AER Compact 60
Marshall AS50D

Now 100% Acoustic and loving it ! No more GAS
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-22-2019, 05:04 PM
russchapman russchapman is offline
agreeable to a fault
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: The Woods
Posts: 99
Default

I did it to my Collings- 600 grit and start rubbing. Feels so much better (that's what Matte said).

You don't have to sand down to the wood, btw. Just hit it until it's no longer glossy.

Last edited by russchapman; 10-22-2019 at 05:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > General Acoustic Guitar Discussion

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=