The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > LISTEN

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-12-2020, 12:03 AM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default Some Jazz on Vinyl

I’d like to recommend:

Bill Evans Trio: Explorations
from February 2, 1961
Riverside/ Concord Music OJC-037

Bill Evans, piano
Scott La Faro, bass
Paul Motian, drums

A major discovery / precedes “Live at the Village Vanguard” recorded performance later the same year.

Very easy listening
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-12-2020, 01:11 PM
frankmcr frankmcr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 2,697
Default

Everybody loves Bill Evans.
__________________
Martin 0-28VS
Kalamazoo Sport Model
Martin 0-18KH
Fender Robert Cray Strat
Danelectro Dano Pro reissue
Buckeye Mandolin
Kamaka HF-1D
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-12-2020, 02:30 PM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

Bill Evans also had a hand in Miles Davis “Kind of Blue” from 1959, including the liner notes. Apparently he was offered a paltry sum for contributions to that record, which is characterized by the firm, smooth, and cool hand of Davis. Coltrane does characteristically tear things up a bit with the sax on the opening track, but as discussed in some enlightened discussion in the Play and Write section in the thread on jazz guitar, just follow through the musical discourse to the end, and it can be like a puzzle where it eventually all fits together, each solo being an exploration in possibilities presented by the opening theme.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-15-2020, 05:35 PM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

And of course:

Bill Evans Trio: Sunday at the Village Vanguard

From June 25, 1961
Riverside/ Fantasy OJC-140

String bass solos abound in this collection of six tracks, two of which are originals by the bass player, Scott LaFaro, who would (very unfortunately) die in a automobile accident only 10 days after this recording was made.

I think it’s the runner up to Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue” for most popular jazz album of all time.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-15-2020, 06:07 PM
nitram nitram is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 464
Default

Evans' ending to "Blue In Green" is (to my mind) one of the most moving pieces of music I can think of.The entire song is so moody and melancholy and emotional.It's one of the few that never wears out -no matter how many times you hear it.Kind of like Sinatra's "One For My Baby and One More for the Road."
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-15-2020, 06:44 PM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nitram View Post
Evans' ending to "Blue In Green" is (to my mind) one of the most moving pieces of music I can think of.The entire song is so moody and melancholy and emotional.It's one of the few that never wears out -no matter how many times you hear it.Kind of like Sinatra's "One For My Baby and One More for the Road."
Thanks for the recommendation - I’ve found with great musicians often their earliest recordings are most seminal (many others follow later and copy or take inspiration from in the same style), while later works can be more sporadic in quality but yield individual gems.

The collective mind of jazz affecianados and recommendations here is most welcome - I’m all ears.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-15-2020, 08:18 PM
mr. beaumont mr. beaumont is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 8,236
Default

Man, where to start?

Y'all hip to Ike Quebec?
__________________
Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:

http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-15-2020, 09:05 PM
frankmcr frankmcr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 2,697
Default

Okay, just wait while I put on my Illinois Jacquet . . .



don't be fooled by the first 1:30 . . .
__________________
Martin 0-28VS
Kalamazoo Sport Model
Martin 0-18KH
Fender Robert Cray Strat
Danelectro Dano Pro reissue
Buckeye Mandolin
Kamaka HF-1D
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-16-2020, 12:08 AM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by frankmcr View Post
Okay, just wait while I put on my Illinois Jacquet . . .



don't be fooled by the first 1:30 . . .
That really cooks - not sure the year that’s from, but I can hear the explosion of American jazz morphing into rockabilly there - I’m guessing that’s from the very early 1960s. Pretty heady times for American music -
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-16-2020, 06:11 AM
mr. beaumont mr. beaumont is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 8,236
Default

Jacquet was playing like that in the early 40's!

I'd love to know when this version is from, and who's on organ and guitar too.
__________________
Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:

http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-16-2020, 07:00 AM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

I have one lp with him and Grant Green I had set aside because I didn’t like his style - but he could be one of those original geniuses.

It just occurred to me on this general subject - speaking to Americans about this mostly - that the modern New Orleans vibe can come into play, and along with that socio economic disparities that may be unsettling to some.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-16-2020, 07:16 AM
mr. beaumont mr. beaumont is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 8,236
Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaden View Post

It just occurred to me on this general subject - speaking to Americans about this mostly - that the modern New Orleans vibe can come into play, and along with that socio economic disparities that may be unsettling to some.
As an American, I can tell you I have absolutely no idea what this means

But talking about jazz never makes me uncomfortable!

Did a little detective work on that that Jacquet track, it's on a compilation of his stuff on Verve, so somewhere between '51 and '58, I'm guessing on the later side, recording quality is quite good, and you just don't hear organ jazz before the mid-late 50's.
__________________
Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:

http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-16-2020, 10:12 AM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
As an American, I can tell you I have absolutely no idea what this means

But talking about jazz never makes me uncomfortable!

Did a little detective work on that that Jacquet track, it's on a compilation of his stuff on Verve, so somewhere between '51 and '58, I'm guessing on the later side, recording quality is quite good, and you just don't hear organ jazz before the mid-late 50's.
Thanks for the info - first sax player I began to collect was “Newk” aka Sonny Rollins - last time I checked he was still living in New York - time flies & age isn’t an easy thing - but he was no.1 back in the mid 1950s - I’ll have to check some dates. Ike on the other hand really has an individual style - like guitar, it’s the musician rather than the instrument which determines tone.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-16-2020, 11:22 AM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

While we’re on the subject of sax musicians we should visit in with Charlie Parker - in the early 1940s with the background of WWII going on, it’s been said his style (which of course became very influential) is best understood in the context of rapid gunfire, bombs exploding, and the subsequent physical and psychological damage done to humans, and that his art was a reflection and attempt to make sense of that chaos. Ike might be seen in that context too?
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-16-2020, 11:33 AM
Jaden Jaden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,914
Default

On the other hand, to me, the smooth & suave delivery of Sonny Rollins during the mid 1950s is the sound of money, prosperity, and the rise of general standard of living fitting the post war economic boom America was to enjoy.

How’s that for a little bit of music history?

I think his breakthrough LP was in 1954 “Saxophone Colossus”
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > LISTEN

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=