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  #16  
Old 10-23-2012, 01:17 PM
mrmustrd mrmustrd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djeffcoat View Post
I bought my lefty FG-335L new in 1980 for $220. I replaced the tuners with Grover Rotomatics, installed a Martin Thinline pup, changed to a bone nut and saddle and added ivory bridge pins. It sounded great when I bought it and sounds even better today. It has just a couple of scuff marks on it, otherwise it looks new.

Don
A looking to replace the nut on mine , can you tell me what size you used ( or where you got yours)
?
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  #17  
Old 10-23-2012, 02:12 PM
djeffcoat djeffcoat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmustrd View Post
A looking to replace the nut on mine , can you tell me what size you used ( or where you got yours)
?
It was a few years ago. I used a blank bone nut and hand shaped and slotted it myself with sandpaper and needle files using the original as a guide. Tedious and time-consuming. If I were doing this today, I have a local friend/luthier and I would pay him to do it.

I believe that I bought it from Stew-Mac:

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Nuts,_sa...Bone_Nuts.html

As an alternative, you could buy a finished Tusq nut from All-Parts:

http://www.allparts.com/Left-handed-Parts-s/342.htm

Whatever you do, I expect you will hear an improvement in sound.

Good luck,
Don
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  #18  
Old 10-23-2012, 02:35 PM
steveyam steveyam is offline
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Originally Posted by JLS View Post
JLDs do not sound good, when they are cranked like that. I never use them to take out a belly, only for tonal improvement, and longterm stability; Yamahas seem to react very well to them, when they're used in this manner.

Like most Yamahas, your FG335 will need a neck reset at some point, if it doesn't already--when you mention taking the saddle down, that makes me think this might be so. I've done many, many resets on these older Yamahas, and they are well worth the $ to have this done. I always convert them to bolt-ons, as well.

I don't currently own an FG335, though I had one for several years-- this may change if things go the way I want, on an ebay auction...
I agree about the JLD tension. I just tighten mine enough to level the bridge. Actually, having fitted a few now, I find that they don't actually lower the action that much, more so a case of reducing the belly and correcting the bridge tilt as mentioned. You can also 'walk' the wooden rod up and down the bottom of the guitar to experiment how/if it affects the action and/or tone. I have one on my FG-140 and it has opened up the sound no end. The once taught top is now free to move, and move it does with warmth and bass aplenty. In fact it's scientifically proven that the JLD improves volume and tone, you only have to look at how the 'moustache' crease marks are removed from each end of the bridge in the belly area to appreciate how much 'looser' the top is, but here's the laboratory proof: http://www.jldguitar.net/science_proven/graphs.html Breedlove install them in their new guitars.

I reckon I can make a Yamaha with a 4 - 5mm action playable again without resetting the neck. By shaving the bridge, shaving the saddle, nuts slots cut low, JLD bridge doctor fitted, and truss rod set for minimum relief (virtually flat). Do that lot and you can easily get a sub 3mm action. On my 140 I have also fitted Stewmac's tallest frets for playability, and that again gives you a little more leeway action-wise.
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  #19  
Old 10-23-2012, 02:41 PM
drive-south drive-south is offline
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A friend of mine gave me his FG-335 in the early 80's. I owned it until last tear, when I shipped it back to my friend so his son could play it. The only mod I did to it was to replace the original (cheap) tuners with Grover Rotomatics. I was delighted that the tuners bolted right up with no alterations. The Roto's I used were nickel plated and looked really "ORGANIC" on that guitar.

Sorry, I just had to use "organic" in a sentence.
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2013, 04:03 AM
Wowbanger Wowbanger is offline
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Hi All,
I've got a Yamaha FG 355 SB acoustic which I bought 20 odd years ago. It has been broken in half and glued back together with resin glue and has held for years. Now the bridge is starting to lift and twist, making the action at the bottom of the neck way too high. I thought it might be the neck folding in, but you can see the top where the bridge sits is raised and bowed.
I've had the idea that if I fitted a jazz guitar type tailpiece, that would put the string tension onto the end of the body and the strings would push down to some degree at the bridge and may help lower the action slightly. At least it would stop it getting worse.
Anyone know if that would work?
Thanks
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  #21  
Old 02-04-2013, 04:19 AM
steveyam steveyam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wowbanger View Post
Hi All,
I've got a Yamaha FG 355 SB acoustic which I bought 20 odd years ago. It has been broken in half and glued back together with resin glue and has held for years. Now the bridge is starting to lift and twist, making the action at the bottom of the neck way too high. I thought it might be the neck folding in, but you can see the top where the bridge sits is raised and bowed.
I've had the idea that if I fitted a jazz guitar type tailpiece, that would put the string tension onto the end of the body and the strings would push down to some degree at the bridge and may help lower the action slightly. At least it would stop it getting worse.
Anyone know if that would work?
Thanks
Your theory is correct, that is a fix - of sorts. But it would kinda ruin a nice guitar, albeit it make it more playable. It all depends on how much you 'value' the guitar as an original. Look back through this thread and think about fitting a JLD Bridge Doctor. In any case, this may help:

Re action..

1) Firstly, set truss rod for correct amount of relief ie very slightly concave, virtually flat - or a slight variation thereof to suit your playing style. The truss rod is only for this purpose, not to adjust the action per se, although obviously the action is affected by the truss rod setting.

2) Take material off the bottom of the saddle until it just peeps above it's slot. You will then have to recut the bridge string slots to re-introduce a decent 'ramp' or string angle in order to provide downforce and stability on the saddle.

3) If you need to, remove the saddle and skim the top of the bridge by one or two mm. Obviously you then have to repeat (2) above.

4) Cut the nuts slots as low as you can for clean sound and low action.

5) Consider fitting a Bridge Doctor to lower the bridge a tad more.

By doing those things above you often can easily lower an action by 2 - 3mm which for most guitars will negate any need for a reset. The adjustments I mention are not for the the feint hearted, with respect, you have to know what you are doing, so if in doubt get a pro to do the job. I have found that fitting a bridge doctor does not actually lower the bridge that much, it has more of a beneficial effect in stopping it tilting, and also reducing fan shaped tautness in the top below the bridge, thus 'opening up' the guitar for a much bigger, fuller sound - and that has been proven by JLD with graphs and recordings.

I have a Yamaha FG-140 that I did all the above on, plus tall frets, and it never ceases to amaze; the way it plays, and this big, full sound coming from this incredibly light, and frankly, cheaply bought guitar.
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  #22  
Old 02-04-2013, 08:59 PM
sstaylor58 sstaylor58 is offline
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Default Anything to worry about?

I just recently bought an old FG460s-12a 12 string. It sounds great, and has pretty low action, but the neck does take a dive downward at the sound hole. It plays well, only a slight buzz when strummed hard...I tried to adjust the truss rod but it really doesn't seem to move the neck one way or another at all...maybe it doesn't work anymore? My question is, should I have it looked at or leave it alone? Thanks!
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  #23  
Old 02-04-2013, 10:26 PM
Gizmot Gizmot is offline
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I had an FG-300 back in the early 70s and I loved it. I let a ton of great instruments go through my hands in those days and trading that guitar away is one of my big heartaches.
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  #24  
Old 06-25-2013, 10:49 PM
PHJim PHJim is offline
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While the Yamaha FG335s are often referred to as dreadnoughts, they have a unique shape. They aren`t copies of D-35s or any Martin dreadnought. If you place a 14 fret Martin dreadnought back to back with a Guild dreadnought or a Gibson square shouldered dreadnought, like the Hummingbird or Dove or a Larivee dreadnought or a Levin or Goya Goliath (Levin/Goya's name for dreadnought), they will all match exactly.
Try the FG335 or any other Yamaha "dreadnought" back to back with any of the guitars mentioned above, you will see that they don't match, but have their own unique shape.
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  #25  
Old 04-21-2014, 08:26 PM
gilly717 gilly717 is offline
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Smile Grover Rotomatic & JLD Bridge Doctor on FG-335

Thanks. It's good to know that no alteration is needed to install the Grover Rotomatic.
I just revived my FG-335 after 10 years haitus. After installing the JLD Bridge Doctor, the action and intonation went back and became playable without any further modifications. It plays good and little upgrades will not hurt.
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  #26  
Old 04-22-2014, 04:40 AM
leatherguy leatherguy is offline
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You can pick this one up when you're in town to see the Mud Hens play...
http://toledo.craigslist.org/msg/4399596155.html
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  #27  
Old 05-04-2014, 01:02 PM
gilly717 gilly717 is offline
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Thanks. I just replaced my FG-335's tuners. I just have to be careful in removing the old bushings(ferrules) to avoid damaging the peghead. Otherwise, I encountered no problem.
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  #28  
Old 07-06-2014, 06:38 PM
acme97 acme97 is offline
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Wink

I know this is an old thread but just to say, being an experienced acoustic guitar guy, the FG335 is a fave over time from when we first played them as teens back in 1980.

A great, woody tone all it's own. The FG335 ll wasn't as good. I've also sent back higher models of that vintage that didn't sound as good as an FG335.

I have, among other Yammys, an FG351SB I bought online and was hoping would sound just as good. It's real pretty for a plywood guitar...but no chance, sounds terrible. I would sell it if it weren't so cool looking.

Well short story, the FG335 is a winner over a long period of time. And I have lots of usual pre-requisite acoustic guitars by all the makers. AND you don't often find a first series 335 that sounds bad. Pretty consistent, pretty woody-sounding, and pretty cool. Excellent guitar for Neil Young tunes.
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  #29  
Old 07-06-2014, 07:02 PM
scottishrogue scottishrogue is offline
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Cool Yamaha Dreadnought Guitars

I call my '79 Yamaha FG-375S Jumbo Folk guitar a dreadnought wannabee. The lower bout is 1/2" wider, and the waist is 1/2" narrower, but it's all solid wood, Sitka over rosewood...with a fabulous voice, and beautiful wood marquetry. I found it in the local music store, and it was love at first strum! In pristine condition, I thought it was new but later discovered it was 5 years old (1984). Whoever bought it new took very good care of it. It's fully opened up now, and sounds better than the day I brought it home.

Glen

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  #30  
Old 07-06-2014, 07:21 PM
Scootch Scootch is offline
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Funny this old Zombie thread came back. My cousin was trying to learn guitar again and dragged his old FG335ii out. I tuned it and played for awhile this am before we went out fishing. (It was really outta tune! No wonder he was having problems)

A very good sounding and quite playable guitar even as old as it is. I really had fun on it. Clear and airy, chiming high notes and enough bass.
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