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  #1  
Old 09-14-2020, 07:48 PM
Kenny202 Kenny202 is offline
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Default Sound board surface minor crack filling

Have a Cole Clark, nitro cellulose finish. Notice a small crack / split about 3/4" near the rear edge of the guitar. it isn't on a seam etc and could well be because of some impact at some time. The crack isn't raised or even open, just a hairline. Looks pretty stable judging by the dirt in it and looks like it has been there for sometime and not getting worse.

I am in a remote area and hard to get to a Luthier so wondering if I could fill this crack myself as invisibly as possible maybe with Super glue / Carb soda mix? Or something like that. Really no need to cleat of use clamps etc. I just want to fill it.

The guitar is fairly light yellow color on top with dull satin finish. Should I use a razor blade very lightly to remove the dirt on the surface of the crack which actually highlights it, before I fill it? Any help or advice appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 09-15-2020, 03:11 AM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Photo?

What it looks like is important to how we approach a repair

Steve
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  #3  
Old 09-15-2020, 06:48 PM
RonMay RonMay is offline
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Default invisible crack repair

I have watched Jerry Rosa videos on this and I have tried it and it works.
Questions: Can you push from the inside and open the crack a little. Can you see the crack flex when you do this?
I used Titebond, but it's just a wood glue so any good wood glue would do the same. If you use CA or super glue you risk it drying on the outside before you can wipe it off and you are left with residue that can basically only be removed by sanding or scraping. I don't think this will work for you since looks are important.
Then you can push up from the inside while you glue with wood glue from the outside.

You can watch his videos and find out how to fix a lot of different and various things. He's very good.

Your very best option is to find the time and money and take it to a qualified luthier. I doubt it would cost very much at all.

Good luck.

Ron
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:29 PM
Kenny202 Kenny202 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonMay View Post
I have watched Jerry Rosa videos on this and I have tried it and it works.
Questions: Can you push from the inside and open the crack a little. Can you see the crack flex when you do this?
I used Titebond, but it's just a wood glue so any good wood glue would do the same. If you use CA or super glue you risk it drying on the outside before you can wipe it off and you are left with residue that can basically only be removed by sanding or scraping. I don't think this will work for you since looks are important.
Then you can push up from the inside while you glue with wood glue from the outside.

You can watch his videos and find out how to fix a lot of different and various things. He's very good.

Your very best option is to find the time and money and take it to a qualified luthier. I doubt it would cost very much at all.

Good luck.

Ron
Thanks Ron. No its not an open crack or even a split. Just a very small hairline, hard to see actually. I'm in remote Thailand and we do have a Luthier here but like most things you would really be better having a crack it it yourself. They are hardly craftsman here lol. I know what you mean about the superglue, made a horrible mess with it once before and sometimes even sanding polishing doesn't help. Seems to burn into the finish.

I see a video where one guy uses a little suction cup / pump thing to work the glue into the seam. Looked like a good idea.
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:32 PM
RonMay RonMay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny202 View Post
Thanks Ron. No its not an open crack or even a split. Just a very small hairline, hard to see actually. I'm in remote Thailand and we do have a Luthier here but like most things you would really be better having a crack it it yourself. They are hardly craftsman here lol. I know what you mean about the superglue, made a horrible mess with it once before and sometimes even sanding polishing doesn't help. Seems to burn into the finish.

I see a video where one guy uses a little suction cup / pump thing to work the glue into the seam. Looked like a good idea.
If you can't open it up and you can barely see it, then if it were me, I would just let it be.

I sure do wish you well with it what ever you decide.

Ron
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:43 PM
Kenny202 Kenny202 is offline
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I had a look at one of Rosas videos on crack repairs and have seen him before he is great. Man you would need small hands to work internally on acoustic guitars like that fixing braces etc. I would like to fix it more for cosmetic reasons than anything else. I am pretty sure the crack is stable, probably from a small impact rather than a drying out split. I will probably sell the guitar in the future and people generally don't like to see cracks of any kind. So repairing it should bond and seal it and make it look better.

That glue I see a lot of the guys using on guitars. Looks like a furniture glue I used to have back home. Was like a cross between PVA wood glue and epoxy. Very strong. You are 100% right about super glue. No matter how careful you are it runs everywhere and as soon as it runs it all over. If a Luthier was doing a job like that how do they color match?

Do you know what they call that glue? Must be water based as he is using water to thin it down
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:54 PM
RonMay RonMay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny202 View Post
I had a look at one of Rosas videos on crack repairs and have seen him before he is great. Man you would need small hands to work internally on acoustic guitars like that fixing braces etc. I would like to fix it more for cosmetic reasons than anything else. I am pretty sure the crack is stable, probably from a small impact rather than a drying out split. I will probably sell the guitar in the future and people generally don't like to see cracks of any kind. So repairing it should bond and seal it and make it look better.

That glue I see a lot of the guys using on guitars. Looks like a furniture glue I used to have back home. Was like a cross between PVA wood glue and epoxy. Very strong. You are 100% right about super glue. No matter how careful you are it runs everywhere and as soon as it runs it all over. If a Luthier was doing a job like that how do they color match?

Do you know what they call that glue? Must be water based as he is using water to thin it down
I think it's Titebond.

Ron
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  #8  
Old 09-15-2020, 08:22 PM
Kenny202 Kenny202 is offline
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I just had a look online and titebond is available here and it is the same one I used to use back home. Very good product. The off yellow color will probably be very close to what I need too. Thanks again for your help Ron
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  #9  
Old 09-15-2020, 08:26 PM
RonMay RonMay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny202 View Post
I just had a look online and titebond is available here and it is the same one I used to use back home. Very good product. The off yellow color will probably be very close to what I need too. Thanks again for your help Ron
I'm a newbie as well as you and I'm glad watching all those Jerry Rosa videos paid off to some degree.

I have a mid to late 60s Regal Jumbo Western that I'm trying to get back into good playing condition again and I believe eventually I'll get there.

I wish you well amigo and a good outcome with your guitar.

Ron
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Old 09-15-2020, 10:14 PM
Kenny202 Kenny202 is offline
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This is a good video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGrQVNsT5ro
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  #11  
Old 09-15-2020, 11:00 PM
RonMay RonMay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny202 View Post
Exactly.
That's pretty much what I wanted to describe to you. I followed these procedures and it worked out fine.
You can still kind of sorta still see the crack but you sure can't feel it.
I believe I can still see the crack because it sat for about 20 or so years and that's how much dirt and grime got into it. And without a good way to clean it before gluing it it shows up a little.

I think you'll have much better luck without 20 years of dirt to get into the way.

Good luck.

Ron
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  #12  
Old 09-16-2020, 03:06 AM
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kkrell kkrell is offline
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My Lord! Post a picture already. I've read this forum long enough that I value input from "mirwa" Steve.
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